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Philosophy

Statue in a garden of a man thinking

Philosophy

Course Listing

Please visit the Academic Timetable to see which courses are presently being offered, as not all courses listed below run every term. For specific details about program requirements and degree regulations, please refer to the Academic Calendar.

First Year Courses
Course CodeDescriptionCross Listed With
PHIL-1000H Intro Phil Knowlege & Reality An introduction to philosophy through a study of fundamental philosophical problems concerning the nature of reality, knowledge, and the mind, as presented in contemporary writings and/or classical texts. Complements PHIL 1100H. Excludes PHIL 1001Y, 1003H.
PHIL-1100H Intro to Phil Moral & Political An introduction to philosophy through a study of fundamental philosophical problems in moral and political philosophy, as presented in contemporary writings and/or classical texts. Complements PHIL 1000H. Excludes PHIL 1001Y, 1002H.
PHIL-1200H Critical Thinking An introduction to basic principles of good reasoning and argumentation in everyday life and various academic disciplines. Topics include argument structure and evaluation, clarity of expression, common mistakes in reasoning, inductive and deductive reasoning, and formal logic. Excludes PHIL 1004H, 1005Y, UNIV 1002H.
Second Year Courses
Course CodeDescriptionCross Listed With
PHIL-2010H Love & Desire An exploration of philosophical treatments of love and desire, in order to consider fundamental questions of human nature, happiness and moral practices. Readings in classic and contemporary texts may include such topics as the nature of love, the relationship between what we value and what we desire, and the ethics of relationships. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of department chair.
PHIL-2020H Philosophy of Sport & Recreation A philosophical study of sport and recreation. Topics include conceptual, ethical, political, and aesthetic perspectives on sports, games, play, and leisure. Specific attention will be paid to philosophical issues concerning human movement and physical activity, embodiment and the mind-body relationship, and well-being and quality of life. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of department chair.
PHIL-2030H Death An exploration of philosophical treatments of death and dying, including their implications for a meaningful life. Readings in classical and contemporary texts may include such topics as the nature of death, our attitudes toward mortality, and end-of-life issues. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of department chair.
PHIL-2110H Moral Issues An engaged study of philosophical responses to ethical problems in contemporary society. Topics may include abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, animal rights, censorship and pornography, poverty and civil disobedience, and war and terrorism. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of department chair. Excludes PHIL 2300Y.
PHIL-2141H Discovering Feminist Thought What is feminist theory, and what does it have to do with making/practicing social change? This course explores some of the key historical and contemporary feminist theories, inviting debate about the many different ways that feminists have explained and analyzed social inequalities, imagined alternatives, and strategized for gender justice. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits. Excludes WMST 2040Y. WMST-2141H
PHIL-2150H Philosophy of Law A study of philosophical theories concerning the nature of law, legal systems, and legal reasoning. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of department chair. Excludes PHIL-POST 2032Y. POST-2150H
PHIL-2160H Asian Philosophy An introduction to diverse philosophical traditions of Asia. Special attention is paid to metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical dimensions of such traditions as Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism. Readings include primary sources in translation. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of department chair. Excludes PHIL 2820Y.
PHIL-2270H Philosophy of Mind An introduction to some of the central themes in philosophy of mind. Answers to ontological questions (what kinds of things are minds?) and epistemological questions (can we know that we and others have minds?) are used to focus discussions concerning personal identity, responsibility for action, animals' minds, and artificial intelligence. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of department chair. Excludes PHIL-PSYC 2770Y. PSYC-2270H
PHIL-2320H Existentialism A study of selected figures in Existentialism. Topics may include nihilism, creation, the birth of the individual, the meaning of life, freedom, choice, and commitment. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of department chair. Excludes PHIL 2140Y, 2340H, 2360H.
PHIL-2351H Political Imagination 1 Political thought as it appears in a diversity of sources-e.g., literature, film, theatre-as well as established texts of political theory. With the classical and modern worlds as points of reference, this course opens a particular route of access to political thought. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of instructor. Excludes POST-PHIL 2350Y. POST-2351H
PHIL-2352H Political Imagination II Political thought as it appears in a diversity of sources- e.g., literature, film, theatre-as well as established texts of political theory. With the contemporary political world as its point of reference, this course opens a particular route of access to political thought. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of instructor. Excludes POST-PHIL 2350Y. POST-2352H
PHIL-2390H Biomedical Ethics An examination of central issues in the field of biomedical ethics. Topics may include abortion; euthanasia and assisted suicide; stem cell research; genetics; reproductive technologies; scarce resources; research using human subjects. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of department chair.
PHIL-2410H Symbolic Logic An introductory study of formal logical systems, together with their use in the analysis of various types of arguments. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of department chair. COIS-2410H
PHIL-2420H Ancient Philosophy I A study of early Greek philosophy focusing on Socrates, Plato, and their most influential predecessors. Complements PHIL-AHCL 2430H. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of department chair. Excludes PHIL-AHCL 2400Y. AHCL-2420H
PHIL-2430H Ancient Philosophy II A study of Greco-Roman philosophy focusing on Aristotle and the Hellenistic philosophers including the Epicureans and Stoics. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of department chair. Recommended: PHIL-AHCL 2420H. Excludes PHILAHCL 2400Y. AHCL-2430H
PHIL-2750H Philosophy of Religion An inquiry into the nature of religion and religious belief; the relations among faith, reason, knowledge, and revelation; the analysis of religious language; the mystical claim to direct knowledge of God; the nature of evil; and religion and ethics. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of the department chair.
PHIL-2780H Philosophy of Science A philosophical examination of the construction and validation of scientific theories, models, and experiments, with special emphasis on the question of whether science has a reliable claim to provide one objective truth about the material and human world on the basis of a uniquely rational form of inquiry. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of department chair.
Third Year Courses
Course CodeDescriptionCross Listed With
PHIL-3010H Philosophy & Literature A study of philosophy in literature and of the relationship between philosophy and literature. The focus is on the expression of philosophical ideas in literary or non-philosophical texts. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits or permission of department chair.
PHIL-3020H Philosophy of Emotion An examination of theories of emotion in classical and contemporary philosophical texts. Topics may include the relation of emotion to belief, motivation, and desire; the rationality of emotion; emotions, self-knowledge and self-deception; the relations between different emotions and between emotions and the body. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits or permission of department chair. PSYC-3020H
PHIL-3030H The Meaning of Life An examination of ways of thinking about and ways of answering the question, "What is the meaning of life?" Classical attempts to account for the meaning of life in Eastern and Western philosophies, religious thought, and Indigenous knowledge systems are considered in relation to accounts defended in contemporary philosophical literature. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits or permission of department chair.
PHIL-3050H Philosophy, Gender and Feminism A study of philosophical concepts of gender, sex and sexuality, feminist critique, and developments in feminist philosophies. Prerequisite 7.0 university credits or permission of department chair. Excludes PHILWMST 2031Y. WMST-3050H
PHIL-3110H Classics in Ethical Theory A study of canonical texts in the foundations of morals and particular ethical theories, including virtue ethics, Kantianism, and utilitarianism. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits or permission of department chair. Excludes PHIL 3380Y.
PHIL-3140H Justice & Rights A study of the nature and value of rights in relation to competing theories of justice. Attention is given to the nature of power and oppression in relation to social change; topics may include class, ability, age, gender, and race. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits or permission of department chair. Excludes PHIL-POST 2032Y. POST-3140H
PHIL-3180H Social & Political Philosophy An examination of philosophical theories related to political institutions and practices. Topics may include the foundations of the state, justified use of force, and limits to freedom. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits or permission of department chair. Excludes PHIL 3390Y. POST-3180H
PHIL-3220H Metaphysics A wide-ranging introduction to metaphysics. Topics may include realism and anti-realism, monism and pluralism, substance, change and identity, causation, events, free will and determinism, space and time, universals, properties, necessity, and possible worlds. Readings include classical as well as contemporary readings, with an emphasis on the latter. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits or permission of department chair. Excludes PHIL 3200Y
PHIL-3301H Environmental Ethics Provides a consideration of the moral dimensions of human/nonhuman relationships. We critically examine a range of systems of thought that address such ethical questions, including deep ecology, ecofeminism, Indigenous perspectives, and animal rights, with specific cases on each philosophical orientation. Deals explicitly with the ethical dimensions of ecological restoration. Prerequisite: 1.0 ERST or PHIL credit at the 2000 level or beyond. Excludes ERST 3300Y. ERST-3301H
PHIL-3302H Animals and Society Provides an introduction to animal studies. Topics considered include the constructed divide between humans and non-human animals, societies' use of animals-for food, clothing, entertainment, companionship, research-and the implications of these relationships. The course will also discuss animal rights, animal protection, and posthumanist perspectives. Prerequisite: 1.0 ERST or PHIL credit at the 2000 level or beyond. Excludes ERST 3300Y, ERST-PHIL 330. SAFS-3302H, ERST-3302H
PHIL-3310H Phenomenolgy An investigation of the main ideas and methods of phenomenology, in particular its study of the conditions of experience, self, and world. Special emphasis on the works of Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits including PHIL 2140Y or 2320H or 2340H, or permission of department chair. Excludes PHIL 3150Y.
PHIL-3370H Cyberethics Enables students to develop their own positions about the most important social and moral problems raised by computer use and technologies, including the fragmentation of society into computer "haves" and "have-nots," Internet censorship, pornography, intellectual property rights, and software piracy. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits or permission of department chair. COIS-3370H
PHIL-3420H Early Modern I Reason and Revolution The seventeenth century in Western Europe was an era of important revolutions in scientific, religious, and political thinking. This course studies the role that philosophers and their works played in these revolutions. Authors may include, but are not limited to, Descartes, Princess Elisabeth, Hobbes, Spinoza, Leibniz, and Conway. Complements PHIL 3430H. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits or permission of department chair. Excludes PHIL 3100Y.
PHIL-3430H Early Modern II the Enlightenment The eighteenth century in Western Europe witnessed the rise and then critique of the intellectual movement called the "Enlightenment," characterized by its promotion of freedom, equality, and the scientific method. This course studies philosophers sympathetic to and critical of the Enlightenment, such as Locke, Voltaire, Hume, Rousseau, and Kant. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits or permission of department chair. Recommended: PHIL 3420H. Excludes PHIL 3100Y.
Fourth Year Courses
Course CodeDescriptionCross Listed With
PHIL-4250H Business Ethics & Corporations Examines a number of ethical issues raised by for-profit corporations, including whether corporations are moral agents and the purpose of corporations. Considers stakeholder theory, stockholder theory, Integrative Social Contact Theory, and CSR. Analyzes numerous case studies of corporate actions. Prerequisite: 12.0 university credits, of which 5.0 must be ADMN credits including ADMN 3300H; or both PHIL 1200H (1005Y) and 2110H (2300Y). Excludes ADMN-PHIL 4200Y. ADMN-4250H
PHIL-4310H Adv. Topics in Value Theory A study of central themes in value theory, to be chosen among issues in moral theory, aesthetic theory, and political theory. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits or permission of department chair.
PHIL-4430H Adv Topics Ancient Philosophy A focused study of texts and ideas from philosophers in Greek and Roman antiquity. Specific topics are determined each year. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits including both PHIL-AHCL 2420H and 2430H or 2400Y, or permission of department chair. AHCL-4430H
PHIL-4530H 19th Century Philosophy A study of some central themes and important philosophers of the nineteenth century. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits including PHIL 3100Y or both 3420H or 3430H, or permission of instructor.
PHIL-4540H Twentieth Century Philosophy A study of some central themes and important philosophers of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits including PHIL 3100Y or both 3420H or 3430H, or permission of instructor.
PHIL-4610H Major Texts - I A close study of one or more central texts by one or more important philosophers. Texts and philosophers to change annually. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits or permission of instructor.
PHIL-4710H Philosophy of Mind An in-depth investigation into some of the central issues in philosophy of mind, e.g., consciousness, embodiment, reasons for actions, the emotions, free will, zombies, thinking machines, conscious animals. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits including PHIL-PSYC 2270H or 2770Y or permission of instructor.
PHIL-4901H Reading Course Students will be encouraged to pursue a special interest, largely through independent study, for a half- or full-course credit. Details must be arranged in consultation with the staff in Philosophy at least one month prior to the start of the semester in which the course is to be started. Subject to departmental and decanal approval. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits or permission of department chair.