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Indigenous Studies Ph.D.

Faculty
Chanie Wenjack School for Indigenous Studies

Indigenous Studies Ph.D.

Full-Time Graduate Faculty

Faculty Research Profiles: Indigenous Studies  Associate Professor, Lynne Davis Areas of Supervision:  I am a settler Canadian with eastern European ancestry. My research focuses on Indigenous-settler relations, particularly the complexities and tensions in building relationships and alliances. Changing the way Canadians think – “transforminf settler consciousness: - is another aspect of this work. Creative and decolonizing classroom pedagogies, including digital storytelling, help facilitate transformation.  I will work with students who share these theoretical interest and have a commitment to action and decolonizing educational practices.   Associate Professor, Mark Dockstator Areas of supervision:  My primary interest lies in the practical application of Indigenous knowledge to the contemporary situation of Indigenous Peoples.  For example, how do you incorporate aspects of Indigenous Knowledge into self-government, health care, economic development, land claims? The practical, day to day use and incorporation of Indigenous Knowledge into the lives of Indigenous Peoples is not only a need but also represents the very heart of the continuing existence of Indigenous people as Indigenous peoples. Please note that Professor Dockstator is on leave until July 1, 2019.  Associate Professor, Chris Furgal Areas of supervisions:  My work focuses on exploring key aspects of the relationships between Indigenous peoples, the environment and health. My work is considerate and inclusive of the knowledges and ways of understanding, making decisions, and communicating about these relationships and their importance for Indigenous health.  I will work with students who are similarly interested in these topics. I have an active and longstanding research program on these topics with Arctic communities and encourage students to contact me before applying to the program to inquire about availability and opportunities.  Associate Professor, Michele Lacombe Areas of supervision: My work focuses on the relationship between creative writing, Indigenous identity, and place. My research investigates how storytelling practices link ancestral and contemporary voices, in the process blurring some of the distinctions between land-based and urban perspectives. I am interested in supervising students working in two distinct but potentially overlapping areas: how arts-based approaches engage aspects of colonialism, resurgence, identity, place, and or gender; and how indigenist intellectuals engage critical theory in addressing some of these topics.  Associate Professor, Dan Longboat Areas of supervision: My research interests are diverse and cover topics including Indigenous environmental knowledges and philosophy, Indigenous responses to environmental issues, interactive science and Indigenous knowledge systems, Indigenous education, pedagogy and Indigenous ways of knowing as founded upon Indigenous language and cultures, the recognition and resurgence of traditional Indigenous lifeways and practices, human health and the environment, traditional Indigenous foods and medicines, natural resource development and restoration, community sustainability, international Indigenous networks, the recognition of Treaty and Indigenous rights and understandings of the environment and human impacts of colonialism. Dan is currently on sabbatical for the 2018-2019 academic year.  Associate Professor, Don McCaskill Areas of Supervision:  My research focuses on topics such as: Indigenous urbanization, education, justice and corrections, international community development, and social and cultural change. I specialize in community-based research projects working closely with Indigenous organizations and communities.  I will accept students who are working in the areas of Indigenous urbanization, education, culturally-based social services and international Indigenous issues especially involving community-based methodologies.   Associate Professor, Marrie Mumford Areas of supervision: formally the Canada Research Chair for Aboriginal Arts and Literature for Trent. Marrie was instrumental in the development of the Indigenous theatre, arts, and dance programs within the Chanie Wenjack School.  Marrie is accepting students who are interested in Indigenous performance.   Associate Professor, David Newhouse Areas of supervision: My work focuses broadly on what I call Aboriginal modernity. My work has been an investigation into the tensions and dramas of the emergent modern Aboriginal society in Canada. I will accept students who are interested in exploring and examining aspects of the nature of modern Aboriginal society, particularly on the use of Indigenous knowledge as one of the foundations for Indigenous collective action and institutional development.   Chair in Indigenous Knowledge, Skahendowaneh Swamp Areas of Supervision: I am actively involved in my home community of Akwesasne as a language teacher and Faith Keeper. My research focus is on Haudenosaunee traditional knowledge. I will accept students whose areas of research are connected to Haudenosaunee knowledge and traditions.  Associate Professor, Paula Sherman Areas of supervision: my work is focused primarily in the area of Indigenous histories, and Indigenous women. My focus has been on restoring Indigenous autonomy through historical research that is grounded in Indigenous methodologies and encompassing methods such as Indigenous performance, language, land based knowledge, orality, and archival or documentary sources.  I will accept students who are working in the area of Indigenous history, Indigenous women, or other related fields.  Director of Studies, Doug Williams Areas of supervision:  I am an Anishinaabe member of the Mississaugas of Curve Lake First Nation, a Pipe Carrier, a Sweatlodge keeper and a ceremony leader. I am very much interested in the ongoing study of Indigenous Knowledge in the academy and how that knowledge is applied at the community level. I am deeply concerned with the loss of Anishinaabe language.