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Past Events

FALL TERM- 2017

 

Trends on Class Attendance & Strategies for Student Engagement

facilitated by Cathy Bruce & Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, CTL & School of Education

New Location:  ESC B203 (Environmental Science , Room 203)

Wed, Sept 6, 2017 from 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

Student attendance is directly related to student engagement and student success. However, we are seeing attendance for classes dwindling at rapid rates.  This informal round table discussion will review the research that explains why this is happening and explore what we can do at Trent to keep the students coming! 

 

Scholars' Table - ST

TSC 2.02 (Active Learning Classroom, Student Centre)

Thurs, Sept 7, 2017 from 9:30 am - 11:00 am

 

Establishing a Positive GTA Experience for You and Your Students - PL

facilitated by Anastasia Nepotiuk, Psychology

TSC 2.02 (Active Learning Classroom, Student Centre)

Mon, Sept 11, 2017 from 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

Being a teaching assistant can be difficult and time-consuming, but also incredibly rewarding. Support offered by teaching assistants goes a long way in providing an effective learning environment for the students and is developed both within the classroom and beyond. This facilitation will cover common areas of difficulty for teaching assistants, strategies and tips for getting the most out of their position, as well as provide an opportunity for open-ended discussion about any other issues incoming teaching assistants may have.

 

Adding Interactivity to your Course - Voice Thread, Articulate Storyline, Adobe Captivate & Camtasia - PL

facilitated by Tully Privett, Trent Online

TSC 2.02 (Active Learning Classroom, Student Centre)

Tues, Sept 12, 2017 from 9:30 - 11:00 am

In this session we will explore how VoiceThread (An enhanced online discussion tool), Articulate Storyline (e-learning authoring software), Adobe Captivate (e-learning authoring software), Camtasia (screen capture software) and other easy to use and inexpensive programs can improve the learning experience of your course and engage your students on a whole new level.

 

The Art & Science of Teaching and Learning at Post-Secondary - PL - CANCELLED

facilitated by Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, CTL, Education & Psychology

Room 160 (Conference Room), DURHAM CAMPUS

Tues, Sept 12, 2017 from 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

This session opens the discussion about the balancing act of knowing what to teach and how to teach it. We will explore theoretical frameworks and practical applications for successful collaborations between pedagogy and student learning. Participants will learning about research findings on effective teaching strategies and student engagement while discussing how these principles can be applied to their own teaching practice. Evidence based practices and measurable classroom changes will be reviewed.

 

The Art & Science of Teaching and Learning at Post-Secondary - PL

facilitated by Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, CTL, Education & Psychology

TSC 2.02 (Active Learning Classroom, Student Centre) 

This session opens the discussion about the balancing act of knowing what to teach and how to teach it. We will explore theoretical frameworks and practical applications for successful collaborations between pedagogy and student learning. Participants will learning about research findings on effective teaching strategies and student engagement while discussing how these principles can be applied to their own teaching practice. Evidence based practices and measurable classroom changes will be reviewed.

 

Special Panel:  Indigenous Knowledge & Pedagogies Working Group:  Best Practices for Incorporating Indigenous Knowledge into Non-Indigenous Courses - PD

Moderator:  Cathy Bruce; Panel:  Shari Beaver, Nicole Bell, Dawn Lavell-Harvard, Dan Longboat, David Newhouse

CHANGE IN LOCATION:  THIS SESSION WILL NOW TAKE PLACE IN THE GATHERING SPACE, FIRST PEOPLE'S HOUSE OF LEARNING

Mon, Sept 18, 2017 from 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

This session will be introducing the new Indigenous Knowledge & Pedagogies Working Group. The Centre for Teaching and Learning is honoured to be supporting this initiative. The main aim of the group will be to guide and assist the CTL and faculty in the design, or review and redesign of courses, and in the creation of new course offerings. Please join us for an interactive panel discussion about the best practices for incorporating Indigenous Knowledge in non-Indigenous courses and to learn more about other initiatives to enhance indigenous reconciliation at Trent.

 

What to Do When You're Not Lecturing:  Engaging Students in the Classroom - PL 

facilitated by Joel Baetz, English Literature

Room 160 (Conference Room), DURHAM CAMPUS

Tues, Sept 19, 2017 from 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Lectures are necessary at a university; and when done well, they’re a fine way to deliver a lot of information to a large group. But they don’t always match students’ needs. In this workshop, we’ll discuss ways to structure a class, so that lecturing doesn’t become our default or singular classroom activity.  After a discussion of foundational adult learning theory, we’ll talk about ways to put that theory to good use, so that students are engaged in their own learning.

 

Blackboard Tips and Tricks - There's Gotta be a Better Way! - PL

facilitated by Ian Thomson, Information Technology

TSC 2.02 (Active Learning Classroom, Student Centre)

Wed, Sept 20, 2017 from 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

Description:  This session will feature Blackboard tips and tricks aimed at making your day to day use of the system easier. We’ll talk about sorting the gradebook using Smart Views, working with notifications and groups, and using the retention center to help determine who may be having course difficulty. Additionally this session will feature a QA time for you to ask questions about things that commonly effect your Blackboard usage

 

Cultivating Positive Critical Thinking Habits - PL & Durham

facilitated by Moira Howes, Philosophy

TSC 2.02 (Active Learning Classroom, Student Centre) & via Zoom Media Conferencing in Room 160 / Durham Conference Room 

Mon, Sept 25, 2017 from 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

Research suggests that students find it difficult to apply critical thinking techniques on an ongoing basis, even after they have taken courses in the subject. In part, this is because critical thinking requires on-going support and active cultivation of a specific kind. In this workshop, we will cover methods that can be used in any course to support critical thinking and cultivate positive critical thinking habits. We will also consider some of the emotional, rhetorical, and rational characteristics of environments that best support critical thinking as an engaged practice.

 

FALL TERM - 2016

How to Keep Them Coming! Attendance Trends and Solutions

facilitated by Cathy Bruce, Centre for Teaching and Learning & School of Education & Professional Learning and Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, Centre for Teaching and Learning

Wed, Sept 7, 2016 from 12 noon - 1:30 pm

Student attendance is directly related to student engagement and student success. However, we are seeing attendance for classes dwindling at rapid rates.  This informal round table discussion will review the research that explains why this is happening and explore what we can do at Trent to keep the students coming! 

 

Moving from Classroom Management to Student Engagement (GTA Session)

facilitated by Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, Centre for Teaching and Learning

Wed, Sept 7, 2016 from 10 - 10:45 am

*Location:  Science Complex, Room 215
 

University classrooms and our students have changed in many ways that have had direct and indirect impact on how we teach. Students have a variety of learning styles that may no longer fit within the typical lecture method. This workshop will explore how to establish a climate of learning and student engagement by moving away from a traditional classroom management approach.  Chapman’s (2003) definition of student engagement - cognitive investment in, active participation in and emotional commitment to their learning - will be introduced.  Participants will receive the CTL 10 Ways to Promote Student Engagement resource.

 

Moving from Classroom Management to Student Engagement (GTA Session)

facilitated by Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, Centre for Teaching and Learning

Wed, Sept 7, 2016 from 11 - 11:45 am

Location:  Science Complex, Room 215
 

University classrooms and our students have changed in many ways that have had direct and indirect impact on how we teach. Students have a variety of learning styles that may no longer fit within the typical lecture method. This workshop will explore how to establish a climate of learning and student engagement by moving away from a traditional classroom management approach.  Chapman’s (2003) definition of student engagement - cognitive investment in, active participation in and emotional commitment to their learning - will be introduced.  Participants will receive the CTL 10 Ways to Promote Student Engagement resource.

 

Being the Best TA You Can Be! (GTA Session)

facilitated by Michael Jorgensen, Psychology Masters Student

Thurs, Sept 15, 2016 from 1:30 - 3:00 pm

Being a teaching assistant can be difficult and time-consuming, but also incredibly rewarding. Support offered by teaching assistants goes a long way in providing an effective learning environment for the students and is developed both within the classroom and beyond. This facilitation will cover common areas of difficulty for teaching assistants, strategies and tips for getting the most out of their position, as well as provide an opportunity for open-ended discussion about any other issues incoming teaching assistants may have.

 

The Problems & Opportunities of Project-based Learning: When Good Project Teams Go Bad

facilitated by Gail Johnson Morris, Business Administration

Tues, Sept 20, 2016 from 12-1:30 pm - LIGHT LUNCH PROVIDED

*Location: Room 126, DURHAM CAMPUS
 

Join Dr. Gail Johnson Morris for a fast-paced, interactive session on increasing the effectiveness of Project-Based Learning (PBL) in your classroom. Learn how to engineer project teams that work well and what to do when they don't. You'll take away lots of tips, tricks, & tools to help students achieve their collaborative learning goals.

 

Blended Learning and the Flipped Classroom

facilitated by Fergal O'Hagan, Psychology

Wed, Sept 21, 2016 from 1:30 - 3:00 pm
 

Flipping the classroom is a pedagogical concept that replaces the standard lecture-in-class format with an opportunity to explore concepts and to review materials from outside of class. This can happen in many forms, but the underlying premise is that students review information outside of class and, instead of simply receiving information from the instructor, come prepared to discuss concepts. 

Blended courses integrate a combination of classroom and online activities. Most blended courses replace 25% to 50% of classroom time with online activities through some type of instructional technology. These courses allow for more active learning and flexible scheduling, while maintaining the face-to-face contact characteristic of the classroom. Depending on the course goals and content, the schedule of alternating online and face-to-face components of a blended courses vary from one section to the next. Come out and learn about some examples of different course schedules that employ this technique!

 

How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing (GTA Session)

facilitated by Elaine Scharfe, Psychology

Thurs, Sept 22, 2016 from 10-11:30 am
 

This workshop is based on Paul Silvia’s book "How to write a lot: A practical guide to productive academic writing" and is for anyone who has had any of the following thoughts in the past few months: I can’t find time to write, I would write more if only I could find a big block of time in my weekly schedule, I would write more if I had a better chair (or a better computer or a better desk or a better pen or a better office or a kinder officemate), I am waiting until I feel like it…. In this workshop, one approach to increasing your writing productivity will be presented (Silvia, 2007). Several well-known techniques for changing behaviour will be explained and participants will be guided through several introductory exercises. The workshop will not remove all the guilt and anxiety from the writing process but it may be a start.

 

Tips and Tricks for Mastering BLACKBOARD: There Is An Easier Way To Do It!

facilitated by Ian Thomson, Information Technology

Tues, Sept 27, 2016 from 10-11:30 am
 

Blackboard is a powerful application that is designed to cater to many possibilities and use-cases. However many people can find it challenging to use in a way that maximizes student engagement and effective communication. This session will discuss best-practices and tips to get your Bb courses organized and working to their fullest potential. Topics include grade center management, content organization, group design and much more!

 

Easing the Bumps: An Instructor's Role in Facilitating Student Success in Transitioning to University

facilitated by Andrew Vreugdenhil, Chemistry

Wed, Sept 28, 2016 from 2-3:30 pm
 

Student experiences at any year level can be significantly influenced by an instructor's level of engagement and support. Trent is often described as being student focused and committed to facilitating student success. Even in large first year classes, instructors can create an environment which provides resources and support which foster student independence and confidence. Prof. Vreugdenhil will present on his experiences at the first year level followed by a discussion and exchange of best practices for facilitating student success.   

 

Art of Integrating Indigenous Knowledge into the Academy***part of Spotlight Series

facilitated by Shirley Ida Williams nee Pheasant, Indigenous Studies

Thurs, Sept 29, 2016 from 1:30 - 3:00 pm
 

These sessions are designed to engage and inspire rich discussions and practical strategies for incorporating Indigenous knowledge into our classrooms. Each faculty member is presenting their unique perspective on how we can support Indigenous knowledge integration across disciplines. 

 

Art of Integrating Indigenous Knowledge into the Academy*** part of Spotlight Series

facilitated by David Newhouse, Indigenous Studies and Business Administration

Tues, Oct 4, 2016 from 1:30 - 3:00 pm
 

These sessions are designed to engage and inspire rich discussions and practical strategies for incorporating Indigenous knowledge into our classrooms. Each faculty member is presenting their unique perspective on how we can support Indigenous knowledge integration across disciplines. 

 

SafeTALK Workshop

facilitated by Kate MacIsaac, Student Affairs

Wed, Oct 5, 2016 from 9 - 12 noon
 

SafeTALK, is a training certificate program that trains people to identify individuals with thoughts of suicide and connect them with suicide first aid resources. Approximately 80% of people who have thoughts of suicide invite others to help in many ways. SafeTALK training teaches one to be alert to these invitations and help support an individual's desire to stay safe. 

After completing SafeTALK training, one is better equipped to:

  • recognize signs of thoughts of suicide
  • overcome barriers that lead one to miss, dismiss and avoid suicide
  • use the TALK (tell, ask, listen, keep-safe) steps to refer the person with thoughts to a first aid resource
  • Participants will receive a certificate of recognition of training.

 

Fostering Positive Learning Environments

facilitated by Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, Centre for Teaching and Learning

Thurs, Oct 6, 2016 from 10-11:30 am
 

Research supports the growing challenges in the classroom.  As educators, we have a role in facilitating healthy teaching and learning environments.  Based on Dhaliwal and Stanton (2013) wellbeing in learning environments review from SFU, the 10 factors that promote wellbeing are presented.  “The goal is to foster a healthy classroom and student experience without teaching about health – the wellness comes from course design and instructional practice.” (Hanley-Dafoe, 2015)

 

SAS Accommodations: Inclusions in the Classroom - Advanced Topics- POSTPONED

facilitated by Caleb Hunt & Catherine Munro

Tues, Oct 11, 2016 from 10-11:30 am
 

This presentation will introduce the services available for students and faculty at Trent.  We will explore definitions of disability, accessibility and accommodation/duty to accommodate. We will discuss roles and responsibilities of instructors and students as well as tips on creating an accessible classroom.  Discussion will include practical real world examples and challenges as well as an introduction to the assistive & mobile technologies often used by students with disabilities. 

 

Teaching Portfolios: Introduction to Collecting, Selecting and Reflecting (Faculty Session)

facilitated by Cathy Bruce, Centre for Teaching and Learning & School of Education and Professional Learning

Wed, Oct 12, 2016 from 12-1:30 pm
 

Our teaching portfolio is evidence of our teaching philosophy, pedagogy and practice.  This session will introduce the different types of teaching portfolios and their strengths and uses.  We will also provide participants with criteria for: 

  • collecting resources and material for your teaching portfolio
  • selecting the most relevant evidence, and 
  • writing brief reflections to frame those samples

Discussions regarding the collection, selection and reflection of samples will focus on teaching, but will also address evidence of research abilities.

 

How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing (Faculty Session)

facilitated by Elaine Scharfe, Psychology

Thurs, Oct 13, 2016 from 10-11:30 am
 

This workshop is based on Paul Silvia’s book "How to write a lot: A practical guide to productive academic writing" and is for anyone who has had any of the following thoughts in the past few months: I can’t find time to write, I would write more if only I could find a big block of time in my weekly schedule, I would write more if I had a better chair (or a better computer or a better desk or a better pen or a better office or a kinder officemate), I am waiting until I feel like it…. In this workshop, one approach to increasing your writing productivity will be presented (Silvia, 2007). Several well-known techniques for changing behaviour will be explained and participants will be guided through several introductory exercises. The workshop will not remove all the guilt and anxiety from the writing process but it may be a start.

 

Innovative Online Teaching Practices: How to Get the Most Out of Your Online Teaching Experience

facilitated by Lily Chumbley, Trent Online

Wed, Oct 19, 2016 from 10-11:30 am
 

In this session we will look at current best practices as well as emergent strategies for teaching online courses within a Trent University context. Discussions will cover online dialogue, engaging students and building community in a virtual setting as well as effective use of technology.  Practical strategies and solutions for online teaching challenges will be discussed. 

 

Self-Regulation in a University Setting

facilitated by Brenda Smith-Chant, Psychology

Thurs, Oct 20, 2016 from 10-11:30 am
 

There is a long research history of self-regulation skills and how these abilities are related to how students cope and meet the challenges of academics.  This workshop will explore the research related to the biological, emotional, cognitive, social, and prosocial aspects of self-regulation and how it can be applied to the post-secondary learning environment.  The goal is to look at a process to implement and assess practical applications that can be incorporated at the instructor, department, and institutional level.

 

Remote Learning with an Emphasis on Best Practices for Student Engagement

facilitated by Jeff Gardiner, Information Technology

Wed, Oct 26, 2016 from 10-11:30 am
 

Remote learning (or video conferencing) is increasing in applications at the post-secondary level whether for remote class instruction between campuses or for a thesis defense. This session will explore the technology behind the remote learning classrooms. We will also be discussing how to maximize instructional pedagogy and student engagement in remote locations based on empirical best practices.

 

Art of Integrating Indigenous Knowledge into the Academy*** part of Spotlight Series

facilitated by Paula Sherman, Indigenous Studies

Tues, Nov 1, 2016 from 1:30 - 3:00 pm
 

These sessions are designed to engage and inspire rich discussions and practical strategies for incorporating Indigenous knowledge into our classrooms. Each faculty member is presenting their unique perspective on how we can support Indigenous knowledge integration across disciplines. 

 

Teaching Portfolios: Introduction to Collecting, Selecting and Reflecting (GTA Session)

facilitated by Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, Centre for Teaching and Learning

Wed, Nov 2, 2016 from 10-11:30 am
 

Our teaching portfolio is evidence of our teaching philosophy, pedagogy and practice.  This session will introduce the different types of teaching portfolios and their strengths and uses.  We will also provide participants with criteria for: 

  • collecting resources and material for your teaching portfolio
  • selecting the most relevant evidence, and 
  • writing brief reflections to frame those samples

Discussions regarding the collection, selection and reflection of samples will focus on teaching, but will also address evidence of research abilities.  This session will also introduce the practices of authoring statements for your portfolios including philosophy, learning and leadership statements.  A series of examples will be presented and discussed.

 

How to Interpret Your Scantron Reports: Improving Multiple Choice Testing Here at Trent

facilitated by Aaron Slepkov, Physics

Thurs, Nov 3, 2016 from 10-11:30 am
 

One major goal of classroom tests and examinations is to measure student knowledge levels. A test can be poor in more than one way; it can measure knowledge poorly and it can successfully measure the wrong knowledge. In general, a multiple-choice test is only as good as its items. A good test needs to be composed of well-functioning items, but how does one evaluate the quality of those items or the quality of the test on the whole?

In this session you will learn how to interpret key information about the statistical functionality of your test items. You will become familiar with the link between item difficulty and its ability to discriminate between strong and weak students. Through simple and general guidelines, you will be able to use your scantron reports to assess the quality of your test items and your test as a whole, further providing you with strategies for improving your tests year-over-year. This presentation aims to be useful to any instructor who uses multiple choice questions in their tests.

 

Recognizing Excellence: Teaching Awards and Teaching Fellowships

facilitated by Adam Guzkowski, Centre for Teaching and Learning

Wed, Nov 9, 2016 from 10-11:30 am

 

There are many ways in which teaching excellence is celebrated and fostered. This workshop will explore the various types of teaching awards available to the Trent teaching community, including the criteria, process, and timelines for external awards submissions, and the significant supports offered by the Centre for Teaching and Learning. Trent Teaching Fellowships will also be discussed, with a particular focus on the selection criteria and process, and the preparation of successful applications.

 

Building Knowledge: Digital Repositories and the Classroom

facilitated by Dwayne Collins, Library

Thurs, Nov 10, 2016 from 1:30 - 3:00 pm

 

Looking at recent library trends both at Trent and more broadly, this talk will cover how to make use of Digital Repositories both as a pedagogical tool as well as a method of sharing pedagogy. How can student contributions to repositories add to the process of meaning making? How do digital repositories provide raw materials for experiential learning? These questions will be covered in addition to discussing how Digital Repositories can act as a method of showcasing and disseminating the pedagogical tools developed for use in the classroom.

 

Undergraduate Experiential Learning: A History and How-To Guide

facilitated by Stephen Hill, School of the Environment & Matthew Ascah, Student Transitions & Careers

Tues, Nov 15, 2016 from 10-11:30 am
 

Trent University has a strong history of undergraduate Experiential Learning (EL). These high impact practices — community-based research, service learning, internships, etc. — are deeply rewarding for all involved. Still, there are many challenges to incorporating these opportunities into our teaching and learning, such as time and resources, university incentives and culture, and logistics. This facilitated discussion will explore the evolution of experiential learning and share best practices for faculty, instructors and university administrators in incorporating experiential learning into our teaching and community engagement. 

 

Course Design Renewal with Universal Instructional Practices

facilitated by Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, Centre for Teaching and Learning

Wed, Nov 16, 2016 from 10:30 - 12 noon

Location: Room 126, DURHAM CAMPUS
 

Trent University has a long standing reputation of having one of the most diverse student populations.  In our classrooms we see diversity expressed in many ways including but not limited to students’ ages, cultural backgrounds, languages, disabilities, and socio-economic statuses.  The heterogeneity of this inclusive classroom brings with it the challenge to design courses that meet the objectives of the course or program while effectively responding to the needs of all learners. In order to meet these challenges, innovative approaches like Universal Design for Learning (UDL) are being implemented.

This workshop will discuss the principles of UDL and offers ways to implement it in your classroom. UDL is the design of instructional materials and activities that allows the learning goals to be achievable by individuals with wide differences in abilities by means of flexible curricular materials and activities (Hutchinson, 2014). UDL is guided by a set of principles for curriculum development that give all individuals equal opportunities to learn. In this workshop Robyne will demonstrate how to integrate these basic principles in planning and designing your course, as well as in your teaching approaches.  Robyne will use the syllabi and course design from undergraduate courses to explore what worked, what she continues to use and what did not work and why.

 

Blending Live Lectures and Online Seminars: Prospects and Issues

facilitated by Stephen Katz, Sociology & Elaine Scharfe, Psychology

Thurs, Nov 17, 2016 from 1:30 - 3:00 pm
 

This seminar is presented by Professors Stephen Katz (Sociology) and Elaine Scharfe (Psychology) and reviews their experiences in teaching courses that blend live lectures with online seminars.   Items for discussion include: a) evidence for the enhancement of student participation, b) the challenges to integrate lectures, seminars and assignments, c) differential student skills in accessing online materials, d) what is sacrificed and what is gained when live seminars are eliminated, d) how to encourage and control online inter-student interaction, e) demarcating privacy boundaries online, f) integrating online seminar work with other Blackboard tools, g) student evaluation results regarding blended course structures.

 

The New Academic Integrity: Challenges and Processes

facilitated by Dana Capell, Academic Skills

Thurs, Nov 22, 2016 from 10-11:30 am
 

Academic integrity is at the heart — the core value — of the academic enterprise. Achieving it requires an ongoing commitment by all levels of the university community. Unfortunately, recent articles in academic journals and the popular press have brought into question our collective success in living this value. This presentation will provide an overview of the extent and types of academic misconduct university students report engaging in, TA and faculty views of this behaviour, and possible explanations for why academic misconduct is occurring. Information about the AI processes at Trent will be reviewed.

 

Course Design Renewal with Universal Instructional Practices - POSTPONED

facilitated by Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, Centre for Teaching and Learning

Thurs, Nov 24, 2016 from 1:30 - 3:00 pm
 

Trent University has a long standing reputation of having one of the most diverse student populations.  In our classrooms we see diversity expressed in many ways including but not limited to students’ ages, cultural backgrounds, languages, disabilities, and socio-economic statuses.  The heterogeneity of this inclusive classroom brings with it the challenge to design courses that meet the objectives of the course or program while effectively responding to the needs of all learners. In order to meet these challenges, innovative approaches like Universal Design for Learning (UDL) are being implemented.

This workshop will discuss the principles of UDL and offers ways to implement it in your classroom. UDL is the design of instructional materials and activities that allows the learning goals to be achievable by individuals with wide differences in abilities by means of flexible curricular materials and activities (Hutchinson, 2014). UDL is guided by a set of principles for curriculum development that give all individuals equal opportunities to learn. In this workshop Robyne will demonstrate how to integrate these basic principles in planning and designing your course, as well as in your teaching approaches.  Robyne will use the syllabi and course design from undergraduate courses to explore what worked, what she continues to use and what did not work and why.

 

Dealing with Conflict in the classroom: Controversial topics, classroom disruption and supporting marginalized students - FOR FACULTY & INSTRUCTORS

Presented by Dr. Nona Robinson, AVP Students, and Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, Educational Developer & Instructor, Centre for Teaching and Learning

Friday, November 25, 2016 from 10:30 am - 12  noon

An interactive session to explore a range of techniques to introduce and manage controversial discussions, prevent disruptions, and deal with challenging behaviour, while supporting students who may be marginalized or intimidated in heated classroom settings. This session is being offered in response for requests from faculty following recent controversies on campus.

 

 

Dealing with Conflict in the classroom: Controversial topics, classroom disruption and supporting marginalized students - FOR FACULTY & INSTRUCTORS -

facilitated by Cathy Bruce, Dean of Education & School of Professional Learning & Director, Centre for Teaching and Learning & Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, Educational Developer, Centre for Teaching and Learning

Wednesday, November 30, 2016 from 9:00 am - 10:00 am -  DURHAM CAMPUS, Room 126

An interactive session to explore a range of techniques to introduce and manage controversial discussions, prevent disruptions, and deal with challenging behaviour, while supporting students who may be marginalized or intimidated in heated classroom settings. This session is being offered in response for requests from faculty following recent controversies on campus.

 

The Three-Minute Model to Developing Student Communication and Critical Thinking Skills

facilitated by Melanie Sedge, Champlain College & Erin Stewart Eves, Academic Skills 

Tues, Nov 29, 2016 from 1:30-3:00 pm
 

The popularity of the Three Minute Thesis® (3MT®) competitions at universities around the world, and here at Trent, reflects a common recognition by faculty, administrators, and students that academic research must be disseminated in meaningful and engaging ways to have real impacts beyond the classroom, the lab, or the archives. The three-minute presentation model requires students to distill details into a focused and brief message, communicate complex ideas in accessible language, and demonstrate the relevance of research to a diverse audience; these transferable skills are essential for new graduates as they pursue professional careers or higher degrees. In this session, we will offer an overview of the 3MT and 3-Minute Paper (3MP) competitions for graduate and undergraduate students at Trent, explore the opportunities to support student skill development using this model in the classroom, and explain how you can encourage participation in these competitions.

 

Navigating Presentation Nerves: Tips & Strategies

facilitated by Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, Centre for Teaching and Learning

Wed, Nov 30, 2016 from 1:30-3:00 pm
 

Speaking in front of groups may cause some of us to feel varying degrees of nervousness and anxiety.  This session is designed for people who are interested in learning more about techniques and self-regulation strategies to successfully navigate presentation nerves. This session is open to everyone! (You will not have to present).

 

Dealing with Conflict in the classroom: Controversial topics, classroom disruption and supporting marginalized students - FOR FACULTY & INSTRUCTORS

Presented by Dr. Nona Robinson, AVP Students, and Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, Educational Developer & Instructor, Centre for Teaching and Learning

Thursday, December 1, 2016 from 2:30 - 4:00 pm

An interactive session to explore a range of techniques to introduce and manage controversial discussions, prevent disruptions, and deal with challenging behaviour, while supporting students who may be marginalized or intimidated in heated classroom settings. This session is being offered in response for requests from faculty following recent controversies on campus.

 

Dealing with Conflict in the classroom: Controversial topics, classroom disruption and supporting marginalized students - FOR GTA STUDENTS

Presented by Dr. Nona Robinson, AVP Students, and Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, Educational Developer & Instructor, Centre for Teaching and Learning

Monday, December 5, 2016 from 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

An interactive session to explore a range of techniques to introduce and manage controversial discussions, prevent disruptions, and deal with challenging behaviour, while supporting students who may be marginalized or intimidated in heated classroom settings. This session is being offered in response for requests from faculty following recent controversies on campus.

 

WINTER TERM

Art of Integrating Indigenous Knowledge into the Academy***part of the Spotlight Series

facilitated by Dan Longboat, Indigenous Studies

Tues, Jan 17, 2017 from 1:30-3:00 pm
 

These sessions are designed to engage and inspire rich discussions and practical strategies for incorporating Indigenous knowledge into our classrooms. Each faculty member is presenting their unique perspective on how we can support Indigenous knowledge integration across disciplines. 

 

Collaborative Approaches to Learning

facilitated by Paul Elliott, School of Education & Professional Learning

Wed Jan 18, 2017 from 1:30-3:00 pm
 

Traditionally, the education system tends to emphasize individual learning. Fortunately, there are approaches to learning that capitalize on collaboration between learners and interactions between groups of learners. These inquiry-based and problem solving approaches to learning are widely promoted as ways to encourage critical thinking and model what often happens in research and business scenarios. Some of these approaches evolved in schools but are easily adapted for use in the post-secondary learning environment. Several approaches will be modelled and explored.

 

Resuscitating the Large Class Lecture: Sources of Life, Learning & Engagement in Lecture-Based Teaching Settings

facilitated by Ray Dart, Business Administration & Brenda Smith-Chant, Psychology

Thurs, Jan 19, 2017 from 10-11:30 am
 

One of the keys factors in creating an effective and positive learning environment is the ability of students to feel personally engaged with their instructor and the other students. Large classes pose a challenge for engaging students, but there are some strategies that can work. In this workshop, two instructors of large classes will discuss research, applications, and practical considerations for creating intimate learning experiences. Attendees should bring along their personal experiences on either the giving or receiving end of large classes – best stories, horror stories, most unusual stories encouraged.

 

Critical Thinking about Critical Thinking

facilitated by Joel Baetz, English Literature

Wed, Jan 25, 2017 from 12-1:30 pm

Location:  Room 126, DURHAM CAMPUS

"Critical thinking" is a popular but tricky term. Faculty, administrators, recruiters, and students all depend on it to sum up the habits of mind they hope are developed during an undergraduate degree. But the term itself is so bloated that it’s difficult to know what it means. In this workshop, we’ll discuss the use and over-use of the term and aim to arrive at a clear and helpful definition, one that will lead us to consider how we can better engage students while helping them learn to think critically.

 

How about Supporting Student Engagement Beyond the Classroom: Trent’s Co-Curricular Record

facilitated by Johanna Hart, Office of Student Affairs

Thurs, Jan 26, 2017 from 10-11:30 am 

In addition to a student’s academic degree, recent employment research has highlighted the importance of skill development through co-curricular involvement. Many Trent faculty support opportunities for student volunteerism that are linked to academic degrees or programs - whether organizing conferences, representing the department at events, or performing volunteer research duties. Trent's Co-Curricular Record provides a tool for students to track their involvement, as well as reflect on the learning that took place. In this workshop, faculty will be introduced to the Co-Curricular Record program at Trent, and will learn how to support students in documenting their co-curricular involvement through the software.

 

The Gamified Classroom: What Play and Serious Leisure Can and Cannot Do

facilitated by Dwayne Collins, Library

Thurs, Jan 26, 2017 from 1:30-3:00 pm
 

Building on research on serious leisure and my own preliminary research with gamers and information behaviour, this talk will look at the benefits and limitations of ‘gamification’ in the classroom. How can ideas of fun, leisure, and games be incorporated into the classroom in meaningful ways? Is gamification even possible at the post-secondary level? How do games encourage and build community and peer-to-peer mentoring and can these methods be used in the classroom?

 

Tips and Tricks for Mastering BLACKBOARD: There Is An Easier Way To Do It!

facilitated by Ian Thomson, Information Technology

Tues, Jan 31, 2017 from 10-11:30 am
 

Blackboard is a powerful application that is designed to cater to many possibilities and use-cases. However many people can find it challenging to use in a way that maximizes student engagement and effective communication. This session will discuss best-practices and tips to get your Bb courses organized and working to their fullest potential. Topics include grade center management, content organization, group design and much more!

 

Answer-Until-Correct Testing - the Good, the Bad, and the (Not-So) Ugly

facilitated by Ralph Shiell, Physics

Thurs, Feb 2, 2017 from 10-11:30 am
 

Over the past few years we have gained extensive experience with answer-until-correct multiple-choice testing tools within classrooms and also exam settings. We have incorporated these tools across disciplines such as physics, chemistry, business and nursing; and within individual and also collaborative exams. In this session I will relate some of our experiences from these endeavours, and share with instructors who are intrigued by this format some tips, tricks and traps that may help them to decide whether to implement this approach. The particular tool we adopt is a scratch-card called the Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique card, or IF-AT card, and I will relate some specific characteristics of this format, and describe how we have extended their use into testing superstructures called integrated testlets, to effectively assess higher-level and more interconnected learning.

 * work completed in collaboration with A. Slepkov & A. Vreugdenhil (Trent), and T. McCurdy (McMaster).

 

How to Deal with Difficult People

facilitated by Robyne Hanley-Dafoe, Centre for Teaching and Learning

Wed, Feb 8, 2017 from 1:30-3:00 pm
 

Many of us have encounters with people we find difficult. Perhaps it is that they are difficult to talk with, work with or to lead.  Many times the variables are outside our control. This session is specifically designed to provide an overview of strategies and techniques to help you to further develop your skill in dealing with difficult conversations and individuals. The workshop will have practical and interactive discussions as well as take-away templates for preparing for difficult conversations.

 

The Pod Model: Enhancing Learning through Blended-Format Peer-Driven Exercises

facilitated by Kateryna Keefer & Robyn Taylor, Psychology

Fri, Feb 10, 2017 from 10-11:30 am
 

The Pod model is a blended-format peer-driven learning model, where students collaborate on a series of enquiry-based exercises both face-to-face and within virtual Pods (small online groups of 3-4 peers), providing peer-review assessments of one another’s work. Designed to deliver the learning benefits of small-group teaching in larger classes, the Pod exercises aim to increase student engagement, improve mastery of the course material, enhance critical and flexible thinking, and increase appreciation for collaborative ways of learning. In this workshop, we will first provide an overview of the Pod model and illustrate its application in a large second-year Psychology course. We will then present the results of an empirical study evaluating the impact, benefits, and limitations of the Pod exercises from the students’ perspective, based on a survey of students from two second-year courses in English Literature and Psychology. Finally, the workshop participants will have the opportunity to reflect on the practical benefits and challenges of the Pod model, ask questions, and provide suggestions for further improvement and adaptation.

 

Mental Health First Aid Certification

facilitated by Blair Niblett, School of Education & Professional Learning

Tues, Feb 21, Wed, Feb 22, Tues, Feb 28 & Wed, March 1, 2017 
 

Mental Health First Aid for Adults who Interact with Youth (aged 12-24) is a 12-hour course that discusses the following mental disorders:

Substance use disorders
Mood disorders
Anxiety disorders
Psychotic disorders
Eating disorders
Deliberate self-injury
Crisis first aid skills for the following situations are learned:
Substance overdose
Suicidal behaviour
Panic attack
Acute stress reaction
Psychotic episode

» Please click here to register for session

Events that have been offered to Trent instructors and graduate students are all listed below by clicking on the appropriate year to the right.

 

Presenting Your Research to an Applied Audience:  Tips and Strategies for Presenting as a Graduate Student (GTA Session)

facilitated by Theresa Stotesbury, Materials Science

Wed, March 1, 2017 from 1:30-3:00 pm
 

Are you a graduate student with a poster presentation to give in the near future? Or just interested in learning more ways to visually communicate your research? This seminar is an informal discussion on tips and strategies to present your graduate research, with a focus on how to communicate your ideas to an applied audience of various academic and industrial experience. We will do this by taking a look at sample posters that have been presented in an array of conferences and tease out components that effectively highlight the research presented. Communication is key! 

 

Teaching for Cultural Inclusivity

facilitated by:  TBD

Wed, March 8, 2017 from 10-11:30 am
 

The perspective and experience of international students can bring rich pedagogical value to our classrooms and for all students. Practicing active inclusivity can help to realize that goal. This workshop will provide practical techniques for making diversity a strength, rather than a problem, in your classroom.  We’ll work to deepen our understanding of the concept of “culture” and how it influences behaviours in classrooms. Finally, we’ll engage in some practical exercises and debrief on challenges and solutions. 

 

Confusing Online Courses: Using Quality Design to Improve the Online Learning Experience

facilitated by Tully Privett, Trent Online

Thurs, March 9, 2017 from 10-11:30 am
 

Refresh or create dynamic online learning environments where students can easily navigate course materials. Careful course design not only makes things easier for students but also makes teaching easier, less time consuming and more enjoyable. In this session we will discuss course layouts, navigation styles, timing, logistics, content, schedules and characteristics of quality online courses.

 

Getting Things Done with Assistive Technology

facilitated by Caleb Hunt, Student Accessibility Services

Tues, March 21, 2017 from 10-11:30 am
 

Assistive Technology means many things to many people but it has the very real potential to provide powerful productivity enhancements to ANY user. This session will explore some practical 'Getting Things Done' workflows by integrating some popular low-cost, low-investment, modern AT tools & apps into routine work, school, and instructional activities.

 

Advanced Topics in Flipped Classrooms:  Exploring the Hurdles You Jump as You Flip a Classroom

facilitated by Jane Mackie, Trent/Fleming School of Nursing

Thurs, March 23, 2017 from 1:30-3:00 pm
 

Flipping the classroom is an active teaching strategy intended to enhance meaningful learning for students. Effectively flipping the classroom requires an intensive effort by the instructor – clear learning objectives must be established, and activities must reflect those learning objectives to ensure learning of content. Students must understand their role and prepare for the class in advance to ensure that they fulfill their own learning goals. While these are two of the key challenges for successful implementation of the flipped classroom, other smaller issues can arise. In this session I will present some of my own strategies and we can apply them to your classroom. I also hope to learn new strategies from others, no matter where you are on the curve of flipping your classroom.

 

Write for Success Lunch and Learn: Research Application Tips for SSHRC and NSERC

Date:  Monday, May 1, 2017

Time:  11:00 am - 1:00 pm

Location:  Gzowski College, Room 110 & 111

Facilitated by:  

Cathy Bruce, Director of Centre for Teaching and Learning and Dean, School of Education and Professional Learning,

Cathy Gates, Director, Office of Research and Services 

Paul Wilson, Associate Professor, Biology

In this session, participants will be provided with an overview of the SSHRC and NSERC funding programs. The meeting will begin with lunch and whole group information, and then we will break into smaller groups for more specific discussion. People who are new to Tri-agency funding and those who have previously submitted proposals are both welcome. You are welcome to bring past applications, reviews, and a sketch of your plans as appropriate. The facilitators of this meeting will bring a wealth of experience to the workshop to support participants. By the end of the session, you will have a better understanding of funding opportunities, receive planning tools for mapping out your program of research, have familiarity with the online submission process, receive an exemplar of a successful application, and feel equipped to prepare your own grant proposal.

Follow-up mentorship and group support meetings will be encouraged at the end of this session.