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Online Course Listing

Please visit the Academic Timetable to see which courses are presently being offered and in which location(s). Not all courses listed below run every term or in all locations. For specific details about program requirements and degree regulations, please refer to the Academic Calendar.

Course Code Description Cross Listed With
ADMN-1021H Financial Accounting I An introduction to the theory of financial accounting and the preparation of financial statements, the theoretical framework of accrual accounting, and the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), including double-entry accounting and the accounting cycle. Professional ethics, behaviour, and corporate social responsibility are integrated into the context of control and accountability.
ADMN-1620H Intro to Information Systems Wherever and whenever information is required, an information system is also required. Core topics include the use of information systems for strategic advantage, their basic underlying technologies, the types of information systems and how they are constructed, managed, and replaced, as well as their ethical and legal use. Prerequisite: COIS 1010H. COIS-1620H
ANTH-1010H Biological Anthropology I Focuses on the biology and behavior of humans, non-human primates, and fossil hominins. Students learn how human form and behavior is shaped by local environment, biology, and culture. Topics include human evolution, skeletal biology, mortuary archaeology, primate behavior, applied anthropology (medical and forensic), human growth, and development. Excludes ANTH 1000Y, 1001H, 1002H.
ANTH-1020H Intro to Sociocultural Anthropology Covers topics such as the idea of culture and its role in shaping the way we see the world; the relationship between society and culture; and the role fieldwork plays in cultural anthropology. Students read classic and/or contemporary ethnographies. Excludes ANTH 1000Y, 1001H, 1002H.
BIOL-1020H Foundations of Biodiversity An examination of the biological principles underlying questions concerning biodiversity and evolution. Begins with a discussion of biodiversity and the implications of its loss. This is followed by consideration of the evolution of life on earth, exploring the underlying processes of natural selection and ecological interactions. Prerequisite: 4U Biology or its equivalent or permission of the department. Excludes BIOM 1000H.
BIOL-1030H Foundations of Cellular & Molecular Biology Designed to explore the role of selected cellular and physiological systems in the maintenance of homeostasis in animals under varying environmental conditions, as well as the molecular basis of hereditary and environmental variation. Prerequisite: 4U Biology or its equivalent. Excludes BIOM 1000H.
BIOL-1050H Human Anatomy Designed to provide a basic understanding of the structure of the human body using a systems approach. In order to gain an appreciation of the complexity of the human body, it is examined on both a microscopic and macroscopic level. Prerequisite: 4U Biology and Chemistry. Recommended: 4U Kinesiology.
BIOL-1051H Human Physiology Designed to provide a basic understanding of the function of the human body using a systems approach. A central theme is the mechanisms used to maintain homeostasis under normal, healthy conditions. Prerequisite: 4U Biology and Chemistry. Recommended: 4U Kinesiology, BIOL 1050H.
CAST-1100H Conflicted Canada An introduction to the conflicts, contexts, and challenges of Canada and what it means to be Canadian. Exploring social, political, and cultural upheavals to the land itself, topics may include colonization and conquest, identity, regional conflict, representations from Riel to hockey, immigration, and art. Excludes CAST 1000Y.
CCTH-1080H Math for Everyday Life Should you buy a ticket for 6/49 or Super 7? If you test positive for a rare disease, what is the chance that you actually have it? How are E. coli bacteria and interest rates related? These are some of the questions we investigate in this course. We also look into the use, misuse, and abuse of mathematics in the media. Prerequisite: Ontario Grade 11 Functions & Relations (MCR3U) or equivalent. Not open to students enrolled in or with credit for any other MATH courses. Does not satisfy the Mathematics requirement for a Bachelor of Science degree. Not for credit toward a major or minor in Mathematics. Offered only at Trent University Durham. MATH-1080H
COIS-1010H Digital World Digital systems have redefined how we work, communicate, and play-just think about the World Wide Web, mobile camera phones, video games, and e-business. Core topics examine the underlying technologies of both computing and information systems and how they have become an integral and indispensable part of our daily lives.
COIS-1620H Intro to Information Systems Wherever and whenever information is required, an information system is also required. Core topics include the use of information systems for strategic advantage, their basic underlying technologies, the types of information systems and how they are constructed, managed, and replaced, as well as their ethical and legal use. Prerequisite: COIS 1010H. ADMN-1620H
ECON-1010H Introductory Microeconomics An introductory treatment of markets, prices, and outputs based on the behaviour of consumers, business firms, and the structure and organization of industries. Selected economic and social policies, including taxation, international markets, and trade policy, are also examined.
ECON-1020H Introductory Macroeconomics An introductory study of the total economy in terms of GDP, employment, unemployment, prices, and inflation using simple economic models. The Canadian banking system, monetary policy, the government sector, government budgets, and fiscal policy are examined. Selected aspects of international trade, the balance of payments, and exchange rates are included.
ENGL-1005H Love and Hate The subject of a million popular songs and poems, all great films, and all of Shakespeare's tragedies, love and hate still defeat us. This course looks at how love and hate are represented in poetry, popular song, drama, and fiction and asks, if "love alters not," why is it that "love will tear us apart"? Excludes ENGL 1000Y.
ERSC-1010H Environmental Science and Sustainability An interdisciplinary inquiry into the biophysical and social foundations that enable the study of environmental issues, emphasizing the scientific, political, social, economic, and historical dimensions of environmental issues. These dimensions are examined through a series of issues including climate change, air pollution, land and resource use, biodiversity and protected areas, contaminants, and water quality and quantity. Excludes ERSC 1000Y.
FRSC-1010H Introduction to Forensic Science Introduces students to forensic science by exploring multiple disciplines, including forensic psychology, chemistry, entomology, pathology, and dentistry, plus DNA forensics, wildlife forensics, arson investigation, food forensics, and bioterrorism. Students are also instructed in investigative procedures using the crime scene house. Prerequisite: 60% or higher in FRSC 1011H. FRSC 1011H is now a pre-requisite for FRSC 1010H. Register in FRSC 1011H in the winter of Year One and FRSC 1010H in Year two
FRSC-1011H Introduction Crime Scene Investigation Introduces students to forensic investigations and crime scene processing. Students are instructed how to gather and document scientific evidence while processing crime scenes in the crime scene house, and then present their findings as written reports, and as expert witnesses in a courtroom setting.
GEOG-1045H Introduction to the Circumpolar World Introduces students to the landscape, peoples, and issues of the circumpolar region. Beginning with an examination of the geography, biological, and physical systems of the Subarctic and Arctic, the course then turns to the Indigenous and contemporary peoples of the region.
HIST-1701H World History to 1800 Examines themes in world history before 1800, paying special attention to Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Excludes HIST 1400Y, 1700Y.
HIST-1702H World History 1800 to Present Examines themes in world history since 1800, paying special attention to Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Explores the creation of a global division between rich and poor nations. Excludes HIST 1400Y, 1700Y.
INDG-1001H Foundations of Indigenous Studies (ICR) Provides a foundation for an informed and critical discussion of Indigenous peoples in Canada with links to Indigenous peoples of the world. Using multiple perspectives, we develop a more complex understanding of Indigenous societies, the issues they face, how these issues are dealt with, and the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples, cultures, societies, and states. Excludes INDG 1000Y.
This course meets the Indigenous Course Requirement.
INDG-1002H Critical Incidents in Indigenous Life (ICR) Examines a selection of critical incidents in Indigenous life and history. Using a four directions analytical model, we examine and discuss issues that shape the daily lives of Indigenous peoples in Canada and the world. Excludes INDG 1000Y.
This course meets the Indigenous Course Requirement.
MATH-1001H Precalculus Mathematics Designed for students needing to strengthen their math background in preparation for further courses in mathematics or the sciences. Topics include rational numbers, decimal representation, real numbers, inequalities, algebraic expressions; trigonometry; functions, including algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; analytic geometry; simple sequences and series. Prerequisite: Ontario Grade 11 Functions and Relations (MCR3U) or equivalent. Not open to students enrolled in or with credit for any MATH courses other than MATH 1050Y, 1051H, 1052H, 1350H, or 2080Y. Does not satisfy the Mathematics requirement for a Bachelor of Science degree. Not for credit toward a major or minor in Mathematics.
MATH-1005H Applied Calculus An introduction to the methods and applications of calculus. Derivatives, exponential and logarithmic functions, optimization problems, related rates, integration, partial derivatives, differential equations. Selected applications from the natural and social sciences. Prerequisite: A Grade 12U mathematics course or its equivalent. Not open to students enrolled in or with credit for MATH 1100Y, 1101Y, 1110H, or 1120H. Not for credit toward a major or minor in Mathematics.
MATH-1051H Non-Calculus Statistics I: Elementary Probability and Statistics Data summary, elementary probability, discrete and continuous distributions, the central limit theorem, estimation and hypotheses testing. This course uses high school mathematics as a foundation and involves the use of computer software. Not open to students enrolled in or with credit for MATH 2560H. Not for credit toward a major or minor in Mathematics. Excludes MATH 1050Y.
MATH-1052H Non-Calculus Statistics II Elementary Statistical Methods Linear regression models, goodness-of-fit and analysis of contingency tables, analysis of variance for completely randomized design, randomized block design and factorial design, nonparametric tests. Use of computer methods for analysis of real data sets. Prerequisite: MATH 1051H. Not for credit toward a major or minor in Mathematics. Excludes MATH 1050Y.
MATH-1080H Math for Everyday Life Should you buy a ticket for 6/49 or Super 7? If you test positive for a rare disease, what is the chance that you actually have it? How are E. coli bacteria and interest rates related? These are some of the questions we investigate in this course. We also look into the use, misuse, and abuse of mathematics in the media. Prerequisite: Ontario Grade 11 Functions & Relations (MCR3U) or equivalent. Not open to students enrolled in or with credit for any other MATH courses. Does not satisfy the Mathematics requirement for a Bachelor of Science degree. Not for credit toward a major or minor in Mathematics. Offered only at Trent University Durham. CCTH-1080H
PHIL-1200H Critical Thinking An introduction to basic principles of good reasoning and argumentation in everyday life and various academic disciplines. Topics include argument structure and evaluation, clarity of expression, common mistakes in reasoning, inductive and deductive reasoning, and formal logic. Excludes PHIL 1004H, 1005Y, UNIV 1002H.
POST-1001H Politics and Power in the Global Age Introduction A comparative and historical introduction to the basic ideas in political studies focusing on power and democracy in the global era. Topics including economic inequality, the environment, consumerism, and surveillance are discussed within the context of intensifying twenty-first-century globalization. Excludes POST 1000Y.
POST-1002H Politics and Power in the Global Age Issues Explores some pressing issues in contemporary politics and challenges students to think about how best to address them. Topics may include political participation, electoral reform, new media, taxation, the politics of resource development, and multiculturalism. Excludes POST 1000Y.
PSYC-1020H Introduction to Psychology I A survey of some of the major areas of psychology, including its historical development and scientific methodology. Includes material on statistics, the biological bases of behaviour, sensory and perceptual processes, as well as a consideration of cognition and memory processes. (For information about web-based versions of this course contact the department.) Excludes PSYC 1010Y.
PSYC-1030H Introduction to Psychology II A survey of some of the major areas of psychology. Includes material on statistics, child and adult development, motivation and emotion, intelligence, personality, health psychology, psychological disorders and their treatment, as well as consideration of some aspects of social psychology. (For information about web-based versions of this course contact the department.) Excludes PSYC 1010Y.
SOCI-1001H Introduction to Sociology I An introduction to sociology's major thinkers, critical perspectives, theoretical foundations, research methods, and fields of inquiry. Course materials focus on the social forces and changes that shape culture, groups, social interaction, and institutions in Canadian and comparative contexts. Excludes SOCI 1000Y.
SOCI-1002H Introduction to Sociology II An examination of one or more sociological studies is used to develop students' understandings of social life, ranging from everyday social interaction to global social structures. Substantive areas in sociology that may be investigated include families, social inequalities, health, deviance, work, education, religion, communications, and social movements. Prerequisite: SOCI 1001H. Excludes SOCI 1000Y.
SPAN-1001H Elementary Spanish I An introduction to understanding, speaking, reading, and writing designed for students with limited or no knowledge of the language. The goal of the course is to encourage students to work towards developing control of everyday vocabulary and basic forms and constructions. Students judged by the instructor to be fluent in Spanish may not receive credit for this course. Excludes HSST 1000Y, 1001H, SPAN 1000Y.
SPAN-1002H Elementary Spanish II Builds on the knowledge gained in HSST 1001H and continues to encourage students to work towards developing control of everyday vocabulary and basic forms and constructions. Seminar activities stress a communicative approach, which is reinforced through written exercises. Prerequisite: HSST 1001H or permission of instructor. Students judged by the instructor to be fluent in Spanish may not receive credit for this course. Excludes HSST 1000Y, 1002H, SPAN 1000Y.
SWRK-1000H Introduction to Social Work An introduction to the profession of social work with an emphasis on its functions, values, ethics, and theoretical base. Methods of intervention, fields of practice, and ideological perspectives are explored, along with critical thinking about intersecting oppressions, diversity, and the practice of social work with various populations within Canadian and global contexts.
SWRK-1001H Introduction to Social Welfare Provides an overview of Canada's social welfare system. Adopting a critical theoretical approach, the historical development of social policies and programs will be examined. Social welfare frameworks and systems in Canada will be considered in light of issues such as culture, ethnicity, class, dignity, diversity, hegemony, and oppression.
Course Code Description Cross Listed With
ADMN-2021H Financial Accounting II Builds on Financial Accounting I, focusing on the limitations, controversies, problems, and shortcomings with accounting and accounting information. Students analyze financial statements and critically evaluate financial reports. Professional ethics, behaviour, and corporate social responsibility are integrated into the context of control and accountability. Prerequisite: ADMN 1021H.
ADMN-2200H Intro to Stats for Econ & Mgmt Introduces statistical methods in an applied setting with an emphasis on the development of theory through interactive learning. The material covered includes descriptive statistics, data analysis, inference, and estimation techniques. Prerequisite: 60% or higher in ECON 1010H and 1020H. ECON-2200H
ADMN-2250H Math for Economics & Mgmt Topics include partial and general equilibrium, elementary linear algebra, elementary calculus, basic optimization theory, comparative static analysis, and linear programming. These tools are integrated with and applied to micro and macroeconomic theory and managerial economics. Prerequisite: 60% or higher in ECON 1010H and 1020H. ECON-2250H
AHCL-2999H Origins of Modern Terminology Introduces students to the role of ancient Greek and Latin in technical terminology and generates a core vocabulary of words and word parts to better comprehend complex etymologies. A modular approach allows students to target specific streams in science, medicine, law, and other fields. No prior knowledge of Greek or Latin needed. Not for credit toward a major or minor in Ancient Greek & Roman Studies.
ANTH-2410H Biological Anthropology II Students learn about the roles of evolution, disease, and death in shaping modern human and non-human primate biology, behaviour, and distribution. Students learn more about research methods and applications of this research. Topics covered include evolution, infectious disease, growth and development, forensic anthropology, skeletal anatomy, and nutrition. Prerequisite: ANTH 1001H or 1010H (or 1000Y) or permission of instructor. Excludes ANTH 2400Y.
BIOL-2050H Intoduction to Genetics Develops a basic understanding of genetics. Mendelian inheritance, chromosome structure, genetic recombination, mutation, the structure of DNA, the nature of genes, and current topics in genetics are investigated using examples from plants, animals, insects, bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Prerequisite: 60% or higher in BIOL 1030H or BIOM 1000H, and 60% or higher in one of BIOL 1020H or 1050H. FRSC-2050H
BIOL-2070H Cell Biology An introduction to cell structure and function, including the organization, physiology, architecture, and interactions of cells. Cellular mechanisms of differentiation, development, cancer, and the immune response are explored. Prerequisite: 60% or higher in BIOL 1030H or BIOM 1000H. Recommended: CHEM 1000H and 1010H.
BIOL-2080H Natural Science Statistics Covers commonly-used statistical tools in Biology, Geography, and Environmental & Resource Science. Lectures address basic statistical methods and background theory. Workshops involve computer-based assignments providing practical experience in statistical application. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 1030H or 1040H or 1050H; or ERSC 1000Y; or both ERSC 1010H and 1020H; or both BIOL 1020H and 1030H. GEOG-2080H, ERSC-2080H
BIOL-2600H Evolution A study of the pattern of the evolution of life over the past billion years focusing on key events and transitions, and the underlying processes that made them happen. Prerequisite: 60% or higher in BIOL 2050H.
CAST-2001H Indigenous Peoples &state Relationships (ICR) Examines the nature of Indigenous relationships with Canada and the impact those relationships have had upon Indigenous peoples and communities. The course engages with different understandings of self-government and sovereignty. Prerequisite: 0.5 INDG, CAST, or POST credit. Excludes INDG-POST 2000Y.
This course meets the Indigenous Course Requirement.
INDG-2001H, POST-2001H
CAST-2002H Indigenous Peoples and Resurgence (ICR) Examines the nature of Indigenous resurgence and contemporary struggles within the state. By understanding the different ways in which Indigenous peoples are reclaiming and revisioning their current relationships, students become aware of the impact Indigenous resurgence is having on Indigenous communities. Prerequisite: 0.5 INDG, CAST, or POST credit. Excludes INDG-POST 2000Y.
This course meets the Indigenous Course Requirement.
INDG-2002H, POST-2002H
CAST-2360Y Canadian History Thro Murder Execution Was Louis Riel a traitor who deserved to be executed? Did diplomat Herbert Norman kill himself because of American accusations that he was a Communist? Was the bombing of Air India Flight 182 "Canada's 9/11"? This course uses such episodes to explore political, social, economic, and cultural changes in Canada. Prerequisite: 3.0 university credits or permission of the chair. Excludes HIST-CAST 2350Y. Students may take only one of HIST-CAST 2360Y or 2361H for credit. HIST-2360Y
COIS-2320H Digital Logic Digital logic describes how computer hardware actually works at the logic gate and circuit level. Core topics include Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, the minimization of Boolean functions and the design of combinational and sequential circuits, including adders, decoders, multiplexers, flip-flops, and memory circuits. Prerequisite: COIS 1020H or 1520H.
COIS-2750H Computer Crime & Forensics Computer crime is the fastest-growing area of illegal activity in the world. Users beware After some background information (how computers work, number systems, information-hiding algorithms), we examine the schemes and techniques used by computer criminals, the forensic techniques used to catch the criminals, and ways to prevent victimization. Recommended prerequisite: COIS 1010H. FRSC-2750H
CUST-2236H New Media Literacy Offers opportunities to practice new media literacies, including those related to online learning, while also providing theoretical frameworks through which to better understand these same literacies and practices. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits.
ECON-2015H Critical Perspectives on Aging An introduction to aging from critical perspectives. Drawing on multidisciplinary perspectives within the Trent Centre for Aging and Society, this course provides a foundation for understanding and analyzing the meaning and significance of aging for individuals, communities, and societies. Topics include life course influences, representations, and problematization of aging, and places for aging. Open to non-Nursing students. NURS-2015H, SOCI-2015H
ECON-2200H Intro to Stats for Econ & Mgmt Introduces statistical methods in an applied setting with an emphasis on the development of theory through interactive learning. The material covered includes descriptive statistics, data analysis, inference, and estimation techniques. Prerequisite: 60% or higher in ECON 1010H and 1020H. ADMN-2200H
ECON-2250H Math for Economics & Mgmt Topics include partial and general equilibrium, elementary linear algebra, elementary calculus, basic optimization theory, comparative static analysis, and linear programming. These tools are integrated with and applied to micro and macroeconomic theory and managerial economics. Prerequisite: 60% or higher in ECON 1010H and 1020H. ADMN-2250H
ENGL-2609H Contagion Explores intersections between medicine and literature with particular attention to the representation of outbreaks and pandemics in historical and contemporary fiction, graphic novels, dystopian works, and film. What does it mean to narrate contagion? What might fictions of contagion teach us about our communities, our priorities, and our (in)humanity? Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits.
ENGL-2810Y Childrens Literature A study of children's literature from the eighteenth century to the present, addressing such topics as folk and fairy tales, the eighteenth-century popular press, the late nineteenth-century cult of the child, illustration, the "Golden Age," and contemporary novels for middle-grade and YA readers. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits including 1.0 ENGL credit. Excludes ENGL 3810Y.
ERSC-2080H Natural Science Statistics Covers commonly-used statistical tools in Biology, Geography, and Environmental & Resource Science. Lectures address basic statistical methods and background theory. Workshops involve computer-based assignments providing practical experience in statistical application. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 1030H or 1040H or 1050H; or ERSC 1000Y; or both ERSC 1010H and 1020H; or both BIOL 1020H and 1030H. GEOG-2080H, BIOL-2080H
ERST-2100H Environmental Science & Politics The roles of science in current environmental controversies. Topics examine science and environmental ethics, the application of science to natural resource management, the contribution of science to action on international environmental problems such as climate change, and the role of science in making decisions about environmental risks. Prerequisite: 1.0 ERSC or POST credit at the 1000 level. POST-2100H
ERST-2320H Lands & Environment of Circumpolar North Explores the lands and environments that define the Circumpolar region and identifies the key issues involving interaction between humans and their environments, examining climate change and its impacts on landscapes, biodiversity, and ecological systems. Provides a broad foundation for the study of circumpolar peoples, economies, landscapes, communities, and adaptation to climate change. GEOG-2320H
ERST-2330H Changing Resources of Circumpolar North Provides students with an in-depth understanding of the key issues which define the future of resources and resource use in the Circumpolar North. Focuses upon the challenges of resource management for governments and communities, and assesses the potential conflicts derived from resource use. Prerequisite: GEOG 1045H and GEOG-ERST 2320H, or permission of the instructor. GEOG-2330H
FRSC-2050H Introduction to Genetics Develops a basic understanding of genetics. Mendelian inheritance, chromosome structure, genetic recombination, mutation, the structure of DNA, the nature of genes, and current topics in genetics are investigated using examples from plants, animals, insects, bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Prerequisite: 60% or higher in BIOL 1030H or BIOM 1000H, and 60% or higher in one of BIOL 1020H or 1050H. BIOL-2050H
FRSC-2750H Computer Crime & Forensics Computer crime is the fastest-growing area of illegal activity in the world. Users beware After some background information (how computers work, number systems, information-hiding algorithms), we examine the schemes and techniques used by computer criminals, the forensic techniques used to catch the criminals, and ways to prevent victimization. Recommended prerequisite: COIS 1010H. COIS-2750H
GEOG-2080H Natural Science Statistics Covers commonly-used statistical tools in Biology, Geography, and Environmental & Resource Science. Lectures address basic statistical methods and background theory. Workshops involve computer-based assignments providing practical experience in statistical application. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 1030H or 1040H or 1050H; or ERSC 1000Y; or both ERSC 1010H and 1020H; or both BIOL 1020H and 1030H. BIOL-2080H, ERSC-2080H
GEOG-2320H Lands & Environment of Circumpolar North Explores the lands and environments that define the Circumpolar region and identifies the key issues involving interaction between humans and their environments, examining climate change and its impacts on landscapes, biodiversity, and ecological systems. Provides a broad foundation for the study of circumpolar peoples, economies, landscapes, communities, and adaptation to climate change. ERST-2320H
GEOG-2330H Changing Resources of Circumpolar North Provides students with an in-depth understanding of the key issues which define the future of resources and resource use in the Circumpolar North. Focuses upon the challenges of resource management for governments and communities, and assesses the potential conflicts derived from resource use. Prerequisite: GEOG 1045H and GEOG-ERST 2320H, or permission of the instructor. ERST-2330H
HIST-2306H Foundations for Indigenous History (ICR) Explores Indigenous histories and grounding history in lands, knowledges, languages, and genders. Examines methodologies such as oral narratives, orality, and land-based research along with methods for gathering knowledge related to Indigenous histories. Explores scholarly positionality as historians, research ethics, and the various formats being used to articulate Indigenous histories. Recommended prerequisite: INDG 1001H. Excludes INDG 2305Y.
This course meets the Indigenous Course Requirement.
INDG-2306H
HIST-2307H Colonial Encounters (ICR) Explores the multifaceted encounters that resulted from European colonialism. The focus of the course is on the lives and experiences of Indigenous peoples in Africa, Asia, the Americas, and the Pacific basin to develop a comprehensive understanding of colonialism and resistance on a global scale. Prerequisite: INDG 2306H. Excludes INDG-HIST 2305Y.
This course meets the Indigenous Course Requirement.
INDG-2307H
HIST-2360Y Canadian History Thro Murder Execution Was Louis Riel a traitor who deserved to be executed? Did diplomat Herbert Norman kill himself because of American accusations that he was a Communist? Was the bombing of Air India Flight 182 "Canada's 9/11"? This course uses such episodes to explore political, social, economic, and cultural changes in Canada. Prerequisite: 3.0 university credits or permission of the chair. Excludes HIST-CAST 2350Y. Students may take only one of HIST-CAST 2360Y or 2361H for credit. CAST-2360Y
HIST-2421H Slavery & Freedom A historical survey of slavery, slave trading, and the contested meanings of freedom in Africa, Brazil, Cuba, the United States, and the Caribbean. We examine revolutions, revolts, being bought and sold, representations of blackness, slave cultures, health, belief systems (Voodoo, Santeria, Obeah), abolition, post-emancipation disporas, and reparations. Prerequisite: 3.0 university credits or permission of the chair.
INDG-2000Y Politics & Indigenous Communities Focuses both on the traditional political culture of Indigenous peoples and on the political structures of colonialism (Indian Acts, Treaties, etc.) viewed from legal and historical perspectives. Contemporary analysis treats Indigenous self-government including models of development, cultural and ideological foundations, government policy, and implementation strategies. Prerequisite: INDG 1001H (or 1000Y) or both POST 1001H and 1002H (or 1000Y) or permission of instructor. POST-2000Y
INDG-2001H Indigenous Peoples &state Relationships (ICR) Examines the nature of Indigenous relationships with Canada and the impact those relationships have had upon Indigenous peoples and communities. The course engages with different understandings of self-government and sovereignty. Prerequisite: 0.5 INDG, CAST, or POST credit. Excludes INDG-POST 2000Y.
This course meets the Indigenous Course Requirement.
CAST-2001H, POST-2001H
INDG-2002H Indigenous Peoples and Resurgence (ICR) Examines the nature of Indigenous resurgence and contemporary struggles within the state. By understanding the different ways in which Indigenous peoples are reclaiming and revisioning their current relationships, students become aware of the impact Indigenous resurgence is having on Indigenous communities. Prerequisite: 0.5 INDG, CAST, or POST credit. Excludes INDG-POST 2000Y.
This course meets the Indigenous Course Requirement.
CAST-2002H, POST-2002H
INDG-2030H Indigenous Peoples & News Media (ICR) Provides context for past and current portrayal of Indigenous topics in the media. With a better understanding of Indigenous cultures, histories, and perspectives, students can report stories related to Indigenous peoples, and about Indigenous peoples, more effectively.
This course meets the Indigenous Course Requirement.
INDG-2306H Foundations for Indigenous History (ICR) Explores Indigenous histories and grounding history in lands, knowledges, languages, and genders. Examines methodologies such as oral narratives, orality, and land-based research along with methods for gathering knowledge related to Indigenous histories. Explores scholarly positionality as historians, research ethics, and the various formats being used to articulate Indigenous histories. Recommended prerequisite: INDG 1001H. Excludes INDG 2305Y.
This course meets the Indigenous Course Requirement.
HIST-2306H
INDG-2307H Colonial Encounters (ICR) Explores the multifaceted encounters that resulted from European colonialism. The focus of the course is on the lives and experiences of Indigenous peoples in Africa, Asia, the Americas, and the Pacific basin to develop a comprehensive understanding of colonialism and resistance on a global scale. Prerequisite: INDG 2306H. Excludes INDG-HIST 2305Y.
This course meets the Indigenous Course Requirement.
HIST-2307H
INDG-2800Y Intro to Nishnaabemowin (ICR) A beginner's course for students with little or no knowledge of the language, emphasizing the use and understanding of Nishnaabemowin through the learning of the basic vocabulary and sentence patterns in class and in the language laboratory. Open to firstyear students.
This course meets the Indigenous Course Requirement.
NURS-2015H Critical Perspectives on Aging An introduction to aging from critical perspectives. Drawing on multidisciplinary perspectives within the Trent Centre for Aging and Society, this course provides a foundation for understanding and analyzing the meaning and significance of aging for individuals, communities, and societies. Topics include life course influences, representations, and problematization of aging, and places for aging. Open to non-Nursing students. ECON-2015H, SOCI-2015H
PHIL-2390H Biomedical Ethics An examination of central issues in the field of biomedical ethics. Topics may include abortion; euthanasia and assisted suicide; stem cell research; genetics; reproductive technologies; scarce resources; research using human subjects. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits or permission of department chair.
POST-2000Y Politics & Indigenous Communities Focuses both on the traditional political culture of Indigenous peoples and on the political structures of colonialism (Indian Acts, Treaties, etc.) viewed from legal and historical perspectives. Contemporary analysis treats Indigenous self-government including models of development, cultural and ideological foundations, government policy, and implementation strategies. Prerequisite: INDG 1001H (or 1000Y) or both POST 1001H and 1002H (or 1000Y) or permission of instructor. INDG-2000Y
POST-2001H Indigenous Peoples &state Relationships (ICR) Examines the nature of Indigenous relationships with Canada and the impact those relationships have had upon Indigenous peoples and communities. The course engages with different understandings of self-government and sovereignty. Prerequisite: 0.5 INDG, CAST, or POST credit. Excludes INDG-POST 2000Y.
This course meets the Indigenous Course Requirement.
INDG-2001H, CAST-2001H
POST-2002H Indigenous Peoples and Resurgence (ICR) Examines the nature of Indigenous resurgence and contemporary struggles within the state. By understanding the different ways in which Indigenous peoples are reclaiming and revisioning their current relationships, students become aware of the impact Indigenous resurgence is having on Indigenous communities. Prerequisite: 0.5 INDG, CAST, or POST credit. Excludes INDG-POST 2000Y.
This course meets the Indigenous Course Requirement.
INDG-2002H, CAST-2002H
POST-2100H Environmental Science & Politics The roles of science in current environmental controversies. Topics examine science and environmental ethics, the application of science to natural resource management, the contribution of science to action on international environmental problems such as climate change, and the role of science in making decisions about environmental risks. Prerequisite: 1.0 ERSC or POST credit at the 1000 level. ERST-2100H
POST-2280H Introduction to International Security An introduction to the various forms of security in the international system-past, present, and those that are emerging to address new and future threats to the increased digitalization and interconnectedness of the global order.
PSYC-2400H Introduction to Cognitive Psychology Focuses on humans as processors of information. Topics include perception, attention, memory, knowledge, consciousness, and reasoning. Prerequisite: 60% or higher in PSYC 1020H and 1030H (or in PSYC 1010Y).
SOCI-2015H Critical Perspectives on Aging An introduction to aging from critical perspectives. Drawing on multidisciplinary perspectives within the Trent Centre for Aging and Society, this course provides a foundation for understanding and analyzing the meaning and significance of aging for individuals, communities, and societies. Topics include life course influences, representations, and problematization of aging, and places for aging. Open to non-Nursing students. NURS-2015H, ECON-2015H
SOCI-2700H Sociology of Families Focuses on family and household formation, family dynamics, and the sociological issues raised by these phenomena. Topics may include couple formation, marital and family relationships, divorce and repartnering. Prerequisite: 60% or higher in SOCI 1002H (or in 1000Y). Excludes SOCI 3700Y.
WMST-2410H The Revolution Will Be Recorded: Popular Culture, Gender, And Social Movements Examines the role of popular culture in various forms-including live theatre, music, fashion, film, and television-within Canadian and American social movements of the twentieth century that sought to reimagine gender. Emphasizes the role of race, class, sexuality, ability, and medium in the production and consumption of protest cultures.
Course Code Description Cross Listed With
ADMN-3750H Principles of Online Marketing Businesses today must effectively leverage the Internet and develop an online strategy which complements their traditional business practices. Core topics include website best practices, online marketing and customer relationships, positioning businesses online, and social networking for small and large enterprises. Topics are consolidated with a professional business proposal. Prerequisite: COIS-ADMN 1620H or ADMN 1000H or permission of instructor. COIS-3750H
ADMN-3870H Internship-Field Based Learning Bridges academic theory with field-based learning. Working with employers in the community, students will combine field experience with reflective practice. Students may secure their own work placement, as approved by the faculty supervisor, or interview for various placements identified by the course instructor. Open only to BBA students. Prerequisites: A minimum 70% cumulative average, 3.0 ADMN credits, and permission of course administrator.
ANTH-3745H Virtual Worlds - the Anthropology of Online Communities Focuses on worlds creating in playable media (games), including both massively multiple online games (MMOGs) and tabletop role-playing games. "Virtual" society is now an increasingly taken-for-granted aspect of everyday sociality. This course develops tools and theories for the study of virtual worlds, online and offline. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits. COIS-3745H
CAST-3241H Histories of the Canadian North Introduces students to major themes in the Canadian Northern history, from pre-contact to the creation of the territory of Nunavut in 1999. The major themes focus on evolving cultural, political, socio-economic, and environmental histories. Prerequisite: 6.0 university credits.
CAST-3243H Contemporary Canadian North Circumpolar Explores issues in the contemporary Canadian North with a focus on social, political, economic, and environmental issues. Students are encouraged to critically examine Canada's Northern strategies and compare these to the social and economic priorities of Arctic leaders and Indigenous peoples living in remote Northern communities. Prerequisite: 6.0 university credits.
CAST-3640H Geography of the Polar Regions Study of selected aspects of the Polar regions with considerable reference to northern Canada but with the deliberate intention of developing comparisons between it and other parts of the Polar regions. Prerequisite: GEOG 1030H and one of 1040H or 1050H, or permission of instructor. GEOG-3640H
COIS-3370H Cyberethics Enables students to develop their own positions about the most important social and moral problems raised by computer use and technologies, including the fragmentation of society into computer "haves" and "have-nots," Internet censorship, pornography, intellectual property rights, and software piracy. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits or permission of department chair. PHIL-3370H
COIS-3745H Virtual Worlds: the Anthropology of Online Communities Focuses on worlds creating in playable media (games), including both massively multiple online games (MMOGs) and tabletop role-playing games. "Virtual" society is now an increasingly taken-for-granted aspect of everyday sociality. This course develops tools and theories for the study of virtual worlds, online and offline. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits. ANTH-3745H
COIS-3750H Principles of Online Marketing Businesses today must effectively leverage the Internet and develop an online strategy which complements their traditional business practices. Core topics include website best practices, online marketing and customer relationships, positioning businesses online, and social networking for small and large enterprises. Topics are consolidated with a professional business proposal. Prerequisite: COIS-ADMN 1620H or ADMN 1000H or permission of instructor. ADMN-3750H
COIS-3820H History & Impact of Computing The history of digital computation is relatively recent, but all around us. By introducing the key people whose insight, inventiveness, and industry have defined the digital world, a framework is developed within which all students can appreciate the fundamental milestones of computing and their impact on the world. Prerequisite: 5.0 university credits.
CUST-3475H The Media of Politics War and revolution, finance capitalism, political advertising-all involve a triangulation of technical media, perception, and power. Exploring the history of this media/perception/politics nexus, the course also focuses directly on the rise of social media and Tweets as objects of political communication and as strategies and tools of politics. Prerequisite: POST 2351H and 2352H (or 2350Y); or CUST 1535H (or 1035Y); or permission of the instructor. POST-3475H
CUST-3515H Modernism and the Avant-Garde Examines one of the most important cultural movements of the twentieth century-modernism. It traces this movement from its genesis in the dynamic city culture of the fin de sicle, to its embodiment in avant-garde art, literature, and cinema, and concludes by considering its problematic transition into postmodernism. Prerequisite: 4.0 university credits. Students may take only one of CUST 3015Y or 3515H for credit.
ERSC-3502H Environment & Communication Writing Develops skills for plain-language communication of environmental science to non-scientific audiences (general public, community groups, decision-makers, media, and interdisciplinary workplace groups). Public science literacy, evolving media, and new communications technologies are examined. Written assignments in popular formats are emphasized. Prerequisite: 10.0 university credits including ERSC 1010H and 1020H (or 1000Y), and 3.0 additional science credits.
ERST-3390H Contemporary Issues of the Circumpolar Develops a basic appreciation of the most important contemporary challenges surrounding governance and politics, social issues, education and knowledge systems, and global issues in the circumpolar regions of the North. It explores the complexity and inter-relatedness of governance, social policy, gender, indigeneity, and law. GEOG-3390H
ERST-3740H Circumpolar Peoples, Health, Environment Introduces students to the multidisciplinary subject area of circumpolar health with an emphasis on environment and its changing nature as a determinant of health for Indigenous and non-Indigenous residents of the North. Prerequisite: GEOG 1045H and INDG 3745H, or permission of the instructor. INDG-3740H
FRSC-3111H Non-Human Dna Forensics DNA has revolutionized how human forensic investigations take place, yet there are a myriad of non-human applications of DNA technology, including food, wildlife, environmental, and bioterrorism forensics, the tracking of sources of disease outbreaks, and invasive species detection. Theoretical and practical foundations and techniques of DNA analysis are examined through forensic case reviews and in labs. Prerequisite: BIOL-FRSC 2050H, 3700H (or 3620H), and BIOL 3080H.
GEOG-3201H Indigenous People City As Home City As Home Explores Indigenous peoples and the contemporary urban environment using a four directions analytic framework and the metaphor of city as home. Excludes INDG 3200Y. INDG-3201H
GEOG-3202H Indigenous Peoples in Urban Selected Issues and Cities Explores Indigenous peoples' issues and experiences in selected urban environments in Canada and the world. Excludes INDG 3200Y. INDG-3202H
GEOG-3390H Contemporary Issues of the Cir Develops a basic appreciation of the most important contemporary challenges surrounding governance and politics, social issues, education and knowledge systems, and global issues in the circumpolar regions of the North. It explores the complexity and inter-relatedness of governance, social policy, gender, indigeneity, and law. ERST-3390H
GEOG-3640H Geography of the Polar Regions Study of selected aspects of the Polar regions with considerable reference to northern Canada but with the deliberate intention of developing comparisons between it and other parts of the Polar regions. Prerequisite: GEOG 1030H and one of 1040H or 1050H, or permission of instructor. CAST-3640H
INDG-3201H Indigenous People City As Home Explores Indigenous peoples and the contemporary urban environment using a four directions analytic framework and the metaphor of city as home. Excludes INDG 3200Y. GEOG-3201H
INDG-3202H Indigenous Peoples in Urban Centres Sele Explores Indigenous peoples' issues and experiences in selected urban environments in Canada and the world. Excludes INDG 3200Y. GEOG-3202H
INDG-3401H Law & Indigenous Peoples: Fdn (ICR) An introduction to the fundamental precepts, from both a philosophical and practical perspective, that form the foundation of Aboriginal law in Canada. The course content is taught with a balance of experiential learning exercises. Prerequisite: INDG 1001H (or 1000Y). Excludes INDG 3400Y.
This course meets the Indigenous Course Requirement.
INDG-3740H Circumpolar Peoples, Health, Environment Introduces students to the multidisciplinary subject area of circumpolar health with an emphasis on environment and its changing nature as a determinant of health for Indigenous and non-Indigenous residents of the North. Prerequisite: GEOG 1045H and INDG 3745H, or permission of the instructor. ERST-3740H
INDG-3745H Peoples and Cultures of the Circumpolar An introduction to traditional and contemporary cultures of the Circumpolar region through traditional Indigenous and Western perspectives. Broad histories and experiences of the peoples of the Circumpolar North, and the development of northern cultures are explored. Similarities and differences of peoples and cultures and their adaptations to change are discussed.
INDG-3750H Language, Culture, & Circumpolar World A broad examination of circumpolar peoples in North America, Russia and northern Asia, Greenland, and northern Scandinavia. Notions of identity, culture, language, and self-determination are discussed, similarities and differences of northern peoples and cultures are examined, and their adaptations to change and roles as agents of change explored. Prerequisite: GEOG 1045H and INDG 3745H, or permission of the instructor.
PHIL-3370H Cyberethics Enables students to develop their own positions about the most important social and moral problems raised by computer use and technologies, including the fragmentation of society into computer "haves" and "have-nots," Internet censorship, pornography, intellectual property rights, and software piracy. Prerequisite: 7.0 university credits or permission of department chair. COIS-3370H
POST-3475H The Media of Politics War and revolution, finance capitalism, political advertising-all involve a triangulation of technical media, perception, and power. Exploring the history of this media/perception/politics nexus, the course also focuses directly on the rise of social media and Tweets as objects of political communication and as strategies and tools of politics. Prerequisite: POST 2351H and 2352H (or 2350Y); or CUST 1535H (or 1035Y); or permission of the instructor. CUST-3475H
PSYC-3560H Family Development Exposes the student to current life-span developmental theory and research methodology in the area of family relationships. Topics include family-systems theory, attachment theory, Erikson's psychosocial theory, developmental interaction in the child-rearing years, family life transitions, challenging issues of contemporary parenting. Prerequisite: 8.0 university credits including PSYC 2500H; OR 60% or higher in 1020H and 1030H or in PSYC 1010Y and 4.0 NURS credits.
PSYC-3780H Dreams & Dreaming An examination of the history of the meaning and use of dreams in various cultures; modern approaches to the study of dream material; relation of dreams to age, gender, social, and cultural groups using content analysis; correlation of dream content to mental and physical health; lucid dreaming. Prerequisite: 8.0 university credits including one of PSYC 2200H or 2310H.
SWRK-3101H Social Work and Aging Explores and critically assesses social work theories on aging, the elderly in Canada, the impact of oppression on the aging process, and current (as well as developing) gerontological social work practices. Investigates a range of perspectives on aging including life span theory, feminist approaches, critical race perspectives, and Indigenous knowledge(s). Prerequisite: Admission to the BSW professional years or permission of the director.
Course Code Description Cross Listed With
ADMN-4880H Internship - Level 2 Bridges academic theory with field-based learning. Working with employers in the community, students will combine field experience with reflective practice. Students may secure their own work placement, as approved by the faculty supervisor, or interview for various placements identified by the course instructor. Open only to BBA students. Prerequisites: A minimum of 70% cumulative average, 12.0 university credits of which 5.0 must be ADMN credits including ADMN 3870H, and permission of course administrator.
BIOL-4510H Species At Risk Biology & Policy This course examines the quantitative assessment of biological parameters impacting species and populations at risk under governmental species-at-risk legislation. Prerequisite: A minimum cumulative average of 65% in completed BIOL courses and 10.0 university credits including BIOL-FRSC 2050H or BIOL 2260H, or permission of instructor. FRSC-4510H
COIS-4550H Artificial Intelligence Artificial intelligence is the study of those techniques which create perceptions of "machine intelligence" and "intelligent agents." Topics may include but are not limited to expert systems, various evolutionary learning systems such as genetic algorithms, genetic programming, and neural networks. The impact and ethics of artificial intelligence are also examined. Prerequisite: 10.0 university credits including one of COIS 1020H, 1520H, or 1620H.
FRSC-4510H Species At Risk Biol & Policy Examines the quantitative assessment of biological parameters impacting species and populations at risk under governmental species-at-risk legislation. Prerequisite: A minimum cumulative average of 65% in completed BIOL courses and 10.0 university credits including BIOL-FRSC 2050H or BIOL 2260H, or permission of instructor. BIOL-4510H
HIST-4205Y Indg Women & Settler History Explores historical representations of several Indigenous women in what is now North America. Particular attention is paid to the symbolic uses of these women and how their bodies been put into the service of settler histories. Prerequisite: INDG 1000Y or 1.0 WMST credit or 1.0 HIST credit or 10.0 university credits. INDG-4205Y, WMST-4205Y
HIST-4500Y Renaiisance Lives 1350-1600 Examines the lives of individuals and families, both famous and ordinary, striving to make their way in the turbulence of the Renaissance period, shaped both by remarkable human achievements and creativity and by never-ending turmoil caused by climate change, epidemics, economic problems, wars, social conflicts, and religious crises. Prerequisite: 4.0 HIST credits or permission of the chair
INDG-4205Y Indg Women & Settler History Explores historical representations of several Indigenous women in what is now North America. Particular attention is paid to the symbolic uses of these women and how their bodies been put into the service of settler histories. Prerequisite: INDG 1000Y or 1.0 WMST credit or 1.0 HIST credit or 10.0 university credits. HIST-4205Y, WMST-4205Y
INDG-4206H Indigenous Women and Settler History Explores historical representations of several Indigenous women in what is now North America. Particular attention is paid to the symbolic uses of these women and how their bodies been put into the service of settler histories. Prerequisite: INDG 2306H. Excludes INDG-HIST-WMST 4205Y. WMST-4206H
JOUR-4010Y Journalism Project Course
JOUR-4015C Journalism Project Course
JOUR-4020D Journalism Project Course
NURS-4100H Concept Marginalization & At Risk Groups Students examine concept analysis, bringing clarity to practice. Links are made between theory and practice focusing on concepts critical to understanding the disruption to families in situations of death, transition, or crisis. Specific attention is paid to at-risk populations, including the young, elderly, Indigenous peoples, rural populations, women, and the homeless. Prerequisite: A pass in NURS 3020H and 3021H; 60% or higher in NURS 3000H, 3001H, 3004H, 3030H, and NURS-BIOL 3550H; and permission of department.
NURS-4102H Transcultural Concepts in Healthcare Sensitizes students to the cultural diversity of healthrelated values, beliefs, and practices when planning professional interventions for clients' health and well-being. Focus is on caring and curing patterns and practice in relation to different health-illness systems in Canada and elsewhere. Methods for conducting culturological assessments are also included. Prerequisite: A pass in NURS 3020H and 3021H; 60% or higher in NURS 3000H, 3001H, 3004H, 3030H, and NURS-BIOL 3550H; and permission of department.
NURS-4103H Workplace Health Safety Well Being Nurse Using a core framework for healthy work environments and related documents and legislation, exploration of issues, strategies, and outcomes relative to a climate of safety. Student learning is guided by the RNAO Best Practice Guideline, Healthy Work Environments: Workplace Health, Safety and Well-being of the Nurse, a discussion forum, and project proposal/development. Prerequisite: A pass in NURS 3020H and 3021H; 60% or higher in NURS 3000H, 3001H, 3004H, 3030H, and NURS-BIOL 3550H; and permission of department.
NURS-4104H Socio Political Action Builds students' capacity to enact social justice by providing experiential opportunities with advocacy and action projects. Reflecting relational practice and systems-based advocacy skills, students implement emancipatory actions related to current nursing, health, and health care issues, with specific attention paid to aging, community-rural health, the environment, Indigenous peoples, and women's health. Prerequisite: A pass in NURS 3020H and 3021H; 60% or higher in NURS 3000H, 3001H, 3004H, 3030H, and NURS-BIOL 3550H; and permission of department.
NURS-4105H Leadership in Contemporary Nursing Study of current leadership theories; differences between leadership and management; concepts of vision; professional communication; understanding and managing change in the health care system; stewardship; and recognizing, developing, and sustaining individual leadership abilities. Students contemplate self as leader, reflecting on recognition and development of leadership qualities in professional nursing roles. Prerequisite: A pass in NURS 3020H and 3021H; 60% or higher in NURS 3000H, 3001H, 3004H, 3030H, and NURS-BIOL 3550H; and permission of department.
NURS-4106H Health Policy & Profession of Nursing A critical examination of system structure, policymaking process, and relevant legislation, providing an overview of health policy formulation and implementation in Canada/Ontario. Public policy analysis and the role of interest groups are examined, focusing on the role of the nursing profession. Students examine and analyze contemporary health care policy issues. Prerequisite: A pass in NURS 3020H and 3021H; 60% or higher in NURS 3000H, 3001H, 3004H, 3030H, and NURS-BIOL 3550H; and permission of department.
NURS-4108H Transitions Towards Health in Illness An opportunity to develop depth and breadth of knowledge and skills in nursing care of clients/ families with a variety of health and illness issues. Examination of theoretical and research literature relevant to transitions in health and the nurse's role in interdisciplinary teams. Application and integration with independent practice. Prerequisite: A pass in NURS 3020H and 3021H; 60% or higher in NURS 3000H, 3001H, 3004H, 3030H, and NURS-BIOL 3550H; and permission of department. Excludes NURS 3905H, 4202H.
NURS-4201H Primary Health Care An opportunity to develop depth and breadth of knowledge and skills relevant to planning, implementation, delivery, and evaluation of primary health care. Examination of primary care in the Canadian context. Overview of research related to determinants of health. Exploration of other issues and challenges for specific populations. Prerequisite: A pass in NURS 3020H and 3021H; 60% or higher in NURS 3000H, 3001H, 3004H, 3030H, and NURS-BIOL 3550H; and permission of department.
NURS-4203H Rural Nursing Practice An opportunity to develop depth and breadth of knowledge and skills in nursing care of clients/families in rural settings. Examination of theoretical and research literature relevant to practice in a rural setting, the nurse's role, and challenges in the interdisciplinary teams in rural settings. Application and integration with independent practice. Prerequisite: A pass in NURS 3020H and 3021H; 60% or higher in NURS 3000H, 3001H, 3004H, 3030H, and NURS-BIOL 3550H; and permission of department.
NURS-4204H Contemporary Issues Aging & Health An opportunity to develop depth and breadth of knowledge in care of the elderly. Building on the first three years of study, and drawing from current clinical experience, students are encouraged to examine the challenges, implications, and effects of aging on both the individual and his or her family. Prerequisite: A pass in NURS 3020H and 3021H; 60% or higher in NURS 3000H, 3001H, 3004H, 3030H, and NURS-BIOL 3550H; and permission of department.
NURS-4205H Mental Health Care Students develop a greater depth and breadth of knowledge and skills relevant to mental health care. Building on knowledge from previous professional and related courses, learners consider the concept of mental health/illness within the current Canadian context and selected other countries. Prerequisite: A pass in NURS 3020H and 3021H; 60% or higher in NURS 3000H, 3001H, 3004H, 3030H, and NURS-BIOL 3550H; and permission of department.
NURS-4207H Palliative Care Offers opportunities to develop depth and breadth of knowledge in caring for individuals/families dealing with dying and death, regardless of the setting. Building on previous courses and clinical experiences, students examine common issues which prevail throughout various illness trajectories. Prerequisite: A pass in NURS 3020H and 3021H; 60% or higher in 60% or higher in NURS 3000H, 3001H, 3004H, 3030H, and NURS-BIOL 3550H; and permission of department.
NURS-4208H Nursing Perspectives Womens Health Drawing from the meta-paradigm concepts of nursing science-person, health, environment, and nursing- the focus of this course is women's health and women-centered health care delivery in the Canadian context. Androcentric science, sex/gender-based analysis, and topics such as methadone and mothering, smoking as social control, and HPV vaccination are discussed. Prerequisite: A pass in NURS 3020H and 3021H; 60% or higher in NURS 3000H, 3001H, 3004H, 3030H, and NURS-BIOL 3550H; and permission of the department. For non-Nursing students: WMST 2121H and permission of the School of Nursing. WMST-4208H
SWRK-4004H Risk and Resilience Throughout the Lifespan Develops a critical understanding of human behaviour in the social environment through examining relevant theories, strategies, and social work practices. Assessment aimed at identifying factors that place individuals, families, and communities at risk for struggle across a variety of areas and developing strengths-based/resiliency intervention practices are highlighted. Prerequisite: 65% or higher in each of SWRK 4001H and 4002H.
WMST-4205Y Indg Women & Settler History Explores historical representations of several Indigenous women in what is now North America. Particular attention is paid to the symbolic uses of these women and how their bodies been put into the service of settler histories. Prerequisite: INDG 1000Y or 1.0 WMST credit or 1.0 HIST credit or 10.0 university credits. INDG-4205Y, HIST-4205Y
WMST-4206H Indigenous Women and Settler History Explores historical representations of several Indigenous women in what is now North America. Particular attention is paid to the symbolic uses of these women and how their bodies been put into the service of settler histories. Prerequisite: INDG 2306H. Excludes INDG-HIST-WMST 4205Y. INDG-4206H
WMST-4208H Nursing Perspectives Womens Health Drawing from the meta-paradigm concepts of nursing science-person, health, environment, and nursing- the focus of this course is women's health and women-centered health care delivery in the Canadian context. Androcentric science, sex/gender-based analysis, and topics such as methadone and mothering, smoking as social control, and HPV vaccination are discussed. Prerequisite: A pass in NURS 3020H and 3021H; 60% or higher in NURS 3000H, 3001H, 3004H, 3030H, and NURS-BIOL 3550H; and permission of the department. For non-Nursing students: WMST 2121H and permission of the School of Nursing. NURS-4208H
Course Code Description Cross Listed With
BEMA-5000H Principles of EMA I This course will introduce students to the basic principles and theory of biological and environmental monitoring and assessment. Students will learn about tools for monitoring biotic systems in the environment, the importance of geomatics, the role of environmental action plans, environmental monitoring and forecasting, as well as environmental law and policy considerations.
BEMA-5001H Topics in EMA This course will provide students with the opportunity to learn about current environmental monitoring and assessment issues and challenges faced by environmental professionals in the field. This course will be comprised of seminars led by instructors, guest lecturers from university and industry, and students.
BEMA-5002H Principles of EMA II This course will introduce information on environmental ethics, stakeholder perspectives, indigenous land claims, environmental repair and remediation, and provide students with working experience on environmental assessments and action plans. Students should expect to get a good grasp of key players within the environmental sector, and know methods, considerations and key components used in assessments of current or future-impacted environmental systems.
BEMA-5003H Data Analysis for Env Professionals This course will include approaches and tests that are especially relevant to uncontrolled environmental research, including how to draw inference from previous research results and how to include expert opinion in statistical analysis. Students will gain the ability to quickly, efficiently and correctly draw statistical inference from messy data, develop skills in translating statistical results to environmental inference, and develop familiarity with the open-access R statistical software platform.
BEMA-5004H Science Communication for Env. Profess. This course will cover effective writing and presentation of scientific information for both scientific and non-scientific audiences. Issues regarding authorship, language and selection of reputable references will be covered in detail. Students will learn strategies and styles for effective writing and presenting and will learn how to effectively interpret scientific information for non-scientific audiences.
BEMA-5005H Geomatics I This course will provide an introductory overview of the geomatics discipline, including remote sensing, geographical information systems (GIS), global positioning systems (GPS), spatial modelling, and terrain analysis. Students will be introduced to analytical operations in vector, raster and integrated environmental datasets, with practical applications learned through online labs, field, student participation and group project activities.
BEMA-5008H Sampling Design in Env'tl Research This course will introduce students to a variety of quantitative techniques used to make predictions and assessments regarding environmental health and viability. Students will learn how to quantify changes in environmental parameters, model species distributions and population changes, determine the long-term viability of existing populations, and make predictions regarding the fate of ecological communities and ecosystems
BEMA-5009H Environmental Policy This course provides a review of environmental legislation in Canada and abroad, and how it relates to the support, management, and exploitation of ecosystems. Specific attention will be given to past and present environmental standards and regulations, Species-at-Risk legislation, international treaties and obligations regarding air, land, and water, as well as anticipated changes to environmental policy that will impact future standards and practices for industrial development and resource exploitation.
BEMA-5013H BEMA Placement This course will consist of a 15-week placement experience with a government agency, industry, or non-governmental agency, or related laboratory or work unit, on themes and principles learned during coursework associated with the M.BEMA degree. Students will work closely with the instructor and placement host to determine deliverables that will be presented to various stakeholders, as technical report(s) and/or presentation(s).
EDUC-5031H Action Research as Leadership This course connects the concepts of inquiry and leadership through the lens of action research. Using action research as an overarching perspective, students will explore practitioner-led participatory methods of inquiry and engagement. Key course inquiries may include mobilization, knowledge democracy and practitioner leader, dialogue as collective inquiry and cyclical approaches to educational inquiry.
Course Code Description Cross Listed With
EDAQ-A4333E Guidance and Career Part 1 The primary purpose of Guidance and Career Education Part 1 is to provide teachers with the opportunity to gain knowledge and skills in the design, delivery and assessment of the Guidance program. The course is an introduction to basic counselling and communication skills, interpersonal and human relation skills and awareness of the legal and ethical responsibilities for guidance programs and counsellors. Additionally, it supports guidance and career education as being purposively embedded and infused within all teachers' daily planning and instruction.
EDAQ-A4607E Teaching Eng Lang Learners Pt1 Many schools are populated with a student body comprised of English Language Learners from various cultural and linguistic backgrounds. ESL Part 1 offers teachers a better understanding of how to meet the growing needs of English Language Learners. Focusing on theories of second language acquisition, course participants will learn how to assess, accommodate and program for English as a Second Language (ESL) and English Language Development (ELD) students. As well, participants will gain an understanding of how to create a learning environment that fosters equity and inclusiveness. This course will appeal to those who wish to deepen their knowledge on English Language learning and who are looking for tools and resources to support ESL and ELD students in regular classroom settings.
EDAQ-BC011E Primary Division ABQ Mode of Delivery: Online Prerequisite: OCT Member of Good Standing (no other prerequisites required) No Textbook Required The Primary division course (often referred to as an ABQ course) gives teachers the qualifications to teach Kindergarten to Grade 3
EDAQ-BC012E Junior Division ABQ Mode of Delivery: Online Prerequisite: OCT Member of Good Standing (no other prerequisites required) No Textbook Required The Junior division course (often referred to as an ABQ course) gives teachers the qualifications to teach grades 4 to 6.
EDAQ-SA021E Intermediate Math ABQ The Intermediate Math division course (often referred to as an ABQ course) gives teachers the qualifications to teach in the Intermediate Division, grades 7 to 10. Mode of Delivery: Online
EDAQ-SA028E Intermediate Division Science Abq
EDAQ-SA803E INT. Health & Phys Ed ABQ Mode of Delivery: Online Prerequisite: OCT Member of Good Standing (no other prerequisites required) No Textbook Required The Intermediate Health and Physical Education division course (often referred to as an ABQ course) gives teachers the qualifications to teach in the Intermediate Division, grades 7 to 10. An active, healthy lifestyle is the basis of the Ontario Health and Physical Education curriculum. Teachers completing this course will have the opportunity to discover the Physical Education and Health curriculum in depth with a thorough understanding of how to approach instruction with intermediate students in a constantly changing classroom environment. Participants will have the opportunity to study current education research and strategies which support the intermediate student. By the conclusion of the course, participants will have the necessary tools to competently program for intermediate students in the Health and Physical Education classroom. This course is designed to help teachers develop the knowledge and skills necessary for effective teaching in Intermediate Health and Physical Education. It provides an overview of The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 7-10: Health and Physical Education, and related resource documents such as Healthy Food for Healthy Schools and The Ontario Physical and Health Education Association (OPHEA) teacher resource documents and Safety Documents. The course content will provide teachers with both a theoretical and practical foundation in health and physical education. The course will cover a range of topics in health and physical education including motor skill development, fundamental movement skills, teaching games for understanding theory, physical fitness, alternative physical education programs, community partners, inclusive health and physical education, and safety. Teachers will experience practices and strategies for effective planning, instruction, and assessment in health and physical education for the intermediate student. This course also explores the essential contribution that health and physical education make to students' social, emotional, physical and intellectual development. This course will emphasize current trends in Health and Physical Education (childhood obesity, daily physical activity) and challenge teachers to develop practices that support students acquiring the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for living healthy active lives. The goal of this course is to make teachers comfortable and confident in their daily practice with intermediate students. Through participation in motivating online modules, teachers will acquire skills and resources to support them in being effective and engaging educators of health and physical activity.