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What’s On at Trent University

Upcoming events include a lecture by Holocaust Survivor Dr. Max Eisen as well as a lecture about Blockchain Technology by Trent Chancellor Dr. Don Tapscott

Every week new and exciting things are happening at Trent University. Come and be inspired through a range of events, public lectures, panel discussions and debates, all open to the community. Here’s what’s on at Trent University this month:

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Holocaust Survivor Dr. Max Eisen Speaks at Trent University
Time: 7:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.
Location:
Wenjack Theatre
About: Holocaust survivor and Trent Honorary Degree recipient, Dr. Max Eisen will speak about his experiences in Auschwitz and his emigration to Canada in the postwar years. Max has been a key witness in two recent trials in Germany of Holocaust perpetrators, and is featured in the 2018 documentary The Accountant of Auschwitz about SS perpetrator Oskar Groening. For more than 30 years, he has devoted himself to educating Canadians about the Holocaust; telling others about what he saw and suffered through have made him one of Canada's foremost witnesses to genocide. All are welcome at this talk and copies of Max's memoir, By Chance Alone, will be available for purchase.

Saturday, November 10, 2018

Excalibur Varsity Volleyball
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. (women)
          8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. (men)
Location: Trent Athletic Centre Gymnasium
About: Come out to cheer on the Trent Excalibur as they take on University of Toronto.

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Watap Holds More Than Canoes Together: An Ongoing Journey of Connection, Conversation and Creative Design
Time: 7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Location: Canadian Canoe Museum
About: Bill Buxton, 2018 Jack Matthews Fellow, discusses his canoe trip to northern Saskatchewan and the surprising conversations, connections and discoveries of travel by birch canoe. Bill Buxton is principle researcher at Microsoft Research, an avid canoeist and an internationally renowned innovator.

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

On the History of the Future: Now that we can do anything, what should we do?
Time: 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Location: Champlain College Council Chambers, M2
About: In these times of seemingly rapid and unpredictable change, it is little wonder that one might question how we might prepare for what is to come. For sure there is a lot to be concerned about, but yet, there is a lot to know which one can use to guide our decisions. In this conversation, Bill Buxton, 2018 Jack Matthews Fellow, will discuss such tools – things like The Long Nose of Innovation, which suggests that any technology that is going to have a significant impact over the next five years is already fifteen or more years old (and therefore ripe for study in order to prepare).  He will attempt to convince you that any technological decision is inherently an ethical one – hence hammering home the point that there is room for us all to impact and shape our future.  

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Ontario’s Protected Land Shortfall
Time: 7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Location: Thomas A. Stewart Secondary School Auditorium
About: Dr. Diane Saxe, Ontario’s environmental commissioner, will speak about the commitment Canada has made to the Convention of Biological Diversity, a major international treaty to protect at least ten per cent of its marine and coastal areas, and 17 per cent of its land by 2020. Currently, Ontario has 10.7 per cent of its land protected, with no plan to meet the 17 per cent target. This lecture is sponsored by Kawartha Land Trust and Trent University.

Reconstructing Links from within Shackles: Using Scarification and Tattoo to Uncover Origins in the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade
Time: 7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Bagnani Hall, Traill College
About: The trans-Atlantic slave trade forcibly exported 12.5 million Africans to the Americas and Europe. These men, women and children were renamed, separated from one another and dispersed through a variety of plantation societies. A symbol of their African origins was permanent body marking; a tradition that was not carried on in the Americas. By using these marks, often described in the Americas as ‘country marks’ upon African-born slaves, we can begin to trace regional origins inscribed upon those who survived the Middle Passage. Trent History professor, Dr. Katrina Keefer, will deliver this talk.

Thursday, November 16 – Sunday, November 19, 2018

Ten Thousand Villages Pop-up Shop
Time: 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Location: Gzowski College, room 102
About: Start holiday shopping and support fair trade at the Ten Thousand Villages pop-up shop. Fair trade and handmade chocolate, coffee, tea, textiles, scarves, baskets and more will be available for sale. Everyone is welcome to attend this student-organized event. Ten Thousand Villages is a not-for-profit fair trade organization that markets handcrafted products made by disadvantaged artisans from more than 120 artisan groups in 35 countries.

Friday, November 16, 2018

Towards a New Social Contract for the Digital Age
Time: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Location: Trent Student Centre room 1.20
About: Dr. Don Tapscott, Trent University chancellor, is one of the world’s leading authorities on innovation, media and the economic and social impact of technology. Dr. Tapscott will be interviewed by Dr. Len Epp, former investment banker with a doctorate in English Literature from Oxford University, about blockchain technology. Blockchain is an open, distributed, global platform that will fundamentally transform the way we move, store and manage value online.

Saturday, November 17, 2018

Excalibur Varsity Volleyball
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. (women)
          8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. (men)
Location: Trent Athletic Centre Gymnasium
About: Come out to cheer on the Trent Excalibur as they take on McMaster University.

Sunday, November 18, 2018

Excalibur Varsity Volleyball
Time: 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. (women)
          6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. (men)
Location: Trent Athletic Centre Gymnasium
About: Come out to cheer on the Trent Excalibur as they take on Brock University.

Tuesday, November 20 – Thursday, November 22, 2018

Cut and Paste: Understanding the Digital Revolution
Time: 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m., daily
Location:
Trent Student Centre Event Space, room 1.07
About: The annual Ryle Lecture series in Philosophy welcomes Dr. Luciano Floridi, professor of Philosophy and Ethics of Information at the University of Oxford. Professor Floridi. The power of the digital to create the infosphere and the onlife experience is due to its ability to “cut and paste” analog realities, which we thought were either naturally inseparable but are now increasingly decoupled, like presence and location, or naturally separate, like personal information and personal identity, which are now intrinsically coupled.

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Reconciling Memory: Witnessing the Losses of Japanese Canadians
Time: 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bagnani Hall, Traill College
About: The W.L. Morton Lecture welcomes Dr. Pamela Sugiman, dean, Faculty of Arts, Ryerson University.

Saturday, November 24, 2018

Excalibur Varsity Volleyball
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. (women)
          8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. (men)
Location: Trent Athletic Centre Gymnasium
About: Come out to cheer on the Trent Excalibur as they take on Queen’s University.

Sunday, November 25, 2018

Excalibur Varsity Volleyball
Time: 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. (women)
          6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. (men)
Location: Trent Athletic Centre Gymnasium
About: Come out to cheer on the Trent Excalibur as they take on Royal Military College.

Thursday, November 29, 2018

What Happens when Fish go on “The Pill” and Other Pharmaceuticals?
Time: 7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Gzowski College, room 114
About: The annual Schindler Lecture in Aquatic Science welcomes Dr. Karen Kidd of McMaster University. It appears that the pharmaceuticals that we use – pain killers, birth control, antiepileptic drugs, antibiotics, heart medications, etc. – and excrete are not completely broken down during the treatment of municipal wastewaters. These drugs are found in rivers and lakes and some affect the health of fish and other aquatic life. For example, estrogens in the birth control pills can feminize male fish, resulting in their production of eggs and reproductive failure. This talk will describe how commonly-used medications affect aquatic life and what can be done to reduce the risks they pose to our aquatic ecosystems.

For a full calendar of Trent events.  

Posted on November 5, 2018