As of Monday, April 26, Trent University Library & Archives (TULA) will offer contact-less curbside pickup services for library materials to Trent students, staff, and faculty until the end of the stay-home order. During this time, there will be no access to Bata Library or the Durham Campus Library & Learning Centre. For full details, please see our page about Trent Library & Archives service during COVID-19.

New Resources: Women and Social Movements and LGBT Studies

The Library has acquired the following databases:

LGBT Studies in Video

LGBT Studies in Video is a cinematic survey of the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people as well as the cultural and political evolution of the LGBT community. This first-of-its-kind collection features award-winning documentaries, interviews, archival footage, and select feature films exploring LGBT history, gay culture and subcultures, civil rights, marriage equality, LGBT families, AIDS, transgender issues, religious perspectives on homosexuality, global comparative experiences, and other topics.

Women and Social Movements in Modern Empires Since 1820

The project is a collaborative effort by 56 scholars, distinguished and emerging, who have gathered 41 clusters of documents in their fields of expertise.  The clusters range from a few hundred to a several thousand pages.  Each editor also provides a scholarly essay that explores the documents she/he has assembled and places them in historical context. These sources were generated in a wide range of languages.  Each document not in English (and each image and each handwritten document) is accompanied by an abstract that summarizes its significance and makes it accessible for online searches.  The collection includes audio and video material as well as texts drawn from letters, diaries, newspaper articles and a wide range of publications.  

Women’s voices can be found at all levels of imperial history.  As agents of empire, women were active as missionaries, educators, health-care professionals and women’s rights advocates.   As opponents of empire, women were active in nationalist and social reform movements and as conservers of culture.  As people in the vanguard of cultural interaction, women often forged a middle path of innovation in education, health and family life that drew on both imperial and host cultures.

Both resources can be located via Databases A-Z  at https://www.trentu.ca/library/

If you have more questions contact library@trentu.ca