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A fire contained within rocks on a sand beach at dusk overlooking a lake, in the summer

FPHL

FPHL

Elders and Traditional Peoples Gathering

Trent's 41st Annual Gathering

 

Water The First Medicine: Protecting Life For Future Generations
March 3-5, 2017

The annual Elders and Traditional Peoples Gathering is held every year at Trent University. The Elders Gathering was first held at Trent in the 1970's and was the biggest event of its kind.  The gathering provides an opportunity to share Indigenous knowledge through a series of workshops, presentations and gatherings. The Elders Gathering is an opportunity for the students and the community to listen and learn from the stories and knowledge that the Elders and traditional people carry.

Admission: $20 at the door or donation (Students – Free with Student ID, Children under 12- Free)

Schedule of Events:

*Eventbrite Link for Friday and Saturday Performances here you MUST reserve tickets, they are not included in your conference fee.* 

 

Pre Conference Information: 

10:00 a.m. to 3:00 pm, Friday March 3, Ernest and Florence Benedict Gathering Space - all are welcome, no charge.

Indigenous Insights - Indigenous Environmental Studies Presents:

 

Dan Longboat, Chris Furgal, TRACKS, Shirin Nuesslin and Barbara Wall among others will present their Indigenous Environmental Studies and Science program for those interested in learning more about the integration of Western Science and Traditional Indigenous Knowledge.

Program Indigenous Insights 

Undercurrents 

Indigenous Environmental Studies/Science 

10:00 Welcome and Opening 

Introduction to Chris Furgal’s Research – Shirin Nusselin, MASS student and Research Assistant 

10:30 – Utsuk – The Story of Fat 

11:15 – TRACKS Presentation 

12:00 – Lunch 

1:00 – Dan Longboat – Key Note 

1:45 – Barbara Wall - Nibi miinwaa Anishinaabekwewag Water the Responsibility of the Women 

2:30 – Mary Claire – Water, scientific perspective on Nibi 

3:00 - Dan Longboat – Closing comments

 

 

 

Elders and Knowledge Holders

 

(NOTE: This is not our complete list. We will continue to update speaker profiles, session times, and locations as we receive the information. Be sure to keep checking back.)

 

 

Pura Fé

Keynote Address

Session 1 ( Keynote Address)

Time: 10:45am-12:00pm

Location: GCS 114

Session 2 (Canoe Songs)

Time: 2:45 pm-4: 15 pm

Location: GCS 101

 

Canoe Songs...connecting with water through the sharing of her people's East River canoe songs through a vocal and harmony workshop

Pura Fé is a Native singer-songwriter, musician, composer, seamstress, teacher and activist. She is the founding member of the Native American Women’s a Cappel, a trio, Ulali. Pura was born in New York City and raised by her family as well as women singers who are Tuscarora. She now lives in Saskatchewan.  Pura Fé studied and performed with the American Ballet Theatre, the Martha Graham School and performed in some Broadway musicals. She then began singing in bands and commercials as a backup vocalist. She then performed and was nominated at the Juno Awards in 1994.  Pura Fé has lent her voice to many environmental and Indigenous rights groups and campaigns. In 2013, she rowed in the Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign canoe journey. In 2014, she participated in the Honor the Earth Love Water Not Oil Tour with Winona LaDuke to oppose the Enbridge expansions of the tar sands and fracked oil pipelines. She marched with Ulali Project in the front lines of the People's Climate March singing the song, "Idle No More," which she co-wrote with Cary Morin for the Idle No More movement.

Pura Fé moved to North Carolina in the 1990s and volunteered to teach young people in the rural Indian communities of Robeson County, North Carolina. She won the Community Spirit Award from the First Peoples Fund of the Tides Foundation and later won its fellowship award for her volunteer contributions.

 

Anataras (Alan) Brant

Water Drum Lifts Spirit

Session 1 

Time: 1:00pm-2: 30pm

Location: GCS 112

Session 2

Time: 2:45pm-4:15pm

Location: GCS 112

Water Drum Lifts Spirit...The Water Drum is a living being, a beautiful voice that has a body, skin...and is the heartbeat of the Land.  It can be serious (used in ceremony) & it can be entertaining (used in socials).  Always to be respected.

Anataras Brant is Mohawk from Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory. He is Wolf Clan. Anataras loves to talk about the ways of his Ancestors, traditional knowledge sharing and gathering more of this knowledge. Anataras has seven children. His children have grown up surrounded by the Longhouse traditions

 

Claudette Commanda

W (Women)   A  (Advancing)   T  (The)   E  (Emergence) of  R (ReconcilAction):

Anishinabe Women’s Role in Protecting the Water through Action  

Session 1 

Time: 1:00pm-2: 30pm

Location: GCS 114

Session 2

Time: 2:45pm-4: 15pm

Location: GCS 114

WATER- W(Women) A(Advancing) T(The) E(Emergence) of R(ReconcilAction): Anishinabe Women’s Role in Protecting the Water through Action:  The presentation will focus on an Anishinabe perspective on the place and power of our women in creation, ceremony and community; their roles and responsibility as life givers in the protection of water embedded in the inherent sacred trust between women and water. The presentation will also highlight the spiritual, cultural and physical connections between water and human beings; and the importance for human beings to reconcile their relationship with water by understanding their role and responsibility to creation, and their place in creation.  

Claudette Commanda is an Algonquin Anishnaabe from KITIGAN ZIBI ANISHINABEG First Nation in Quebec. She is an alumni of the University of Ottawa Faculty of Common Law and Faculty of Arts. She has been dedicated to promoting First Nation peoples, their history, culture, language, traditional knowledge and rights in various capacities. She has been a student, professor, member and chair of the Aboriginal Education Council. She is a professor for the University of Ottawa’s Institute of Women’s Studies, Faculty of Law, Faculty of Education and the Aboriginal Studies Program as well as teaching various courses. She is also the Executive Director for the First Nations Confederacy of Cultural Education Centres. She is the mother of four children and grandmother of ten.

Dorothy Green

Kontihwatsirahni:rat's-"They Strengthen the Families"

Session 1 

Time: 9:00am-10:30am

Location: GCS 106

Session 2

Time: 2:45pm-4:15pm

Location: GCS

Kontihwatsirahni:rat's...They Strengthen the Families...will focus on Onkwehonwe Midwifery and the healing impact it has on Indigenous women, families, communities & nations.  Sharing how this model of care works in & around haudenosaunee communities by blending traditional ways of knowing & western technology...

Dorothy Green or Yontkehtats, “She carries a bundle”.  Dorothy is from the Mohawk Nation of Tyendinaga and is Wolf Clan. She is a mother of three and a grandmother of thirteen. She graduated from Tsi Non:we Ionnakeratstha Ona:grahsta’ in August 2011, Six Nation’s Maternal and Child Centre’s, Aboriginal Midwifery Program. She then opened “Kenhté:ke Midwives” in May 2012.  The Kontinenhanónhnha Tsi Tkahà:nayen is located in Tyendinaga and has one Midwife and two Birth Attendants. The practice balances Indigenous and Western knowledge. The Centre has been operating for four and a half years now with limited resources and funding.

 

Wanda Whitebird

"Our Sacred Water Bundles"

Session 1 

Time: 9:00am-10:30am

Location: GCS 117

Session 2

Time: 1:00pm-2:30-pm

Location: GCS 117

OUR SACRED WATER BUNDLES...Experiential learning and discussion around our sacred bundles and the importance of water in our everyday lives, intertwining traditional practices with healthy sexual identities.

Wanda Whitebird is a Mi’kmaq woman from Paktnkek-Niktuek First Nation in Nova Scotia. She is Bear Clan. Wanda started her career working as a penitentiary liaison worker and transitioning into working with Indigenous inmates in the prison system in Ontario. She has also worked for Anishnawbe Health in Toronto for thirteen years. Wanda is currently a Women’s Outreach Support Worker for the Ontario Aboriginal HIV/AIDS Strategy (OAHAS).  She has dedicated her time to outreach, bringing important information to lost community members on the streets of Toronto while trying to embrace the philosophy of harm reduction.  Wanda has also been conducting the annual Valentine’s Day Strawberry Ceremony in honour of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women in Toronto for twelve years. Wanda is a ceremonial elder, a pipe carrier and sweat lodge conductor.

 Doug Williams

Sweet Water

Session 1 

Time: 1:00pm-2:30pm

Location: GCS 103

Sweet Water...Traditional Sugar making.  Storytelling around the origins of sweet water.  Will include a brief power point presentation.  

Doug Williams, is Anishnaabe and former Chief of Mississauga’s Curve Lake First Nation. He is now currently the Director for the Ph.D. Program and oversees the cultural and spiritual component of the program. He is a member of the Pike Clan, and was one of the first graduates of what is now called Indigenous Studies at Trent University in 1972. He is a Pipe Carrier, Sweat Lodge Keeper, and ceremony leader. He is a language speaker and considers himself a trapper, a hunter and a fisher. Beyond his work in the academy, he is active at the community level and works to ensure that Indigenous Knowledge is maintained within the communit

 

Shirley Williams

Nibi Emosaawdamojing:  Those that Walk for the Water

Session 1 

Time: 9:00am-10:30am

Location: GCS 115

Session 2

Time: 2:45pm-4:15pm

Location: GCS 103

Those That Walk for the Water...will share the importance of protecting the water and how it all began.  Will include a brief video of the walks

Shirley Williams-Neganigwane, Professor Emeritus, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario. (Nishnaabe-kwe) is a member of the Bird Clan of the Ojibway and Odawa First Nations of Canada. Her Aboriginal name is “Migizi ow-kwe” meaning “that Eagle Woman”. Shirley started her professional research work in the Native Studies Department in 1986 to develop and promote Native language courses within the department. Shirley Williams’ lexicon dictionary for the Nishnaabemowin Language is the foundational reference materials for the double-vowel language system adopted by Nishnaabemowin language teachers throughout the Nishnaabe territories. An Elder at Sweetgrass First Nation Language Council, for the Ministry of Culture and Heritage and Aboriginal Healing Foundation’s First Nations Language programs; and for the Lost Women / Sisters in Spirit campaign; she was given the title of Role Model by the Governor General, Adrienne Clarkson and has recently been invited to sit as the Elder for the Aboriginal Physicians of Canada. Shirley has been a member of the Aboriginal Healing Foundation’s Peterborough activities since its inception. Her primary enthusiasm is for keeping the language alive and strong and to this goal many of her colleagues have come together under her leadership to form what is now known as the Nishinaabemowin Teg Incorporation providing her with the venue to continue her research outside of the University.

Joesphine Mandamin

Water Walkers Journey: sharing about the annual Women's Water Walk journey and water conservation

Session 1  

Time: 9:00am-10:30am

Location: GCS 103

Josephine Mandamin...In the spring of 2012, Josephine Mandamin, an Anishinabe elder originally from the Wikwemikong Unceded Reservation on Manitoulin Island in northern Ontario, will receive her bachelor of arts from Sault Ste. Marie’s Algoma University. But when it comes to water conservation and the role that aboriginal women can play in those efforts, she’s long been the one doing the teaching. Since 2003, Mandamin has led the annual Women’s Water Walk, which began with the circumnavigation of Lake Superior. Walks around Lakes Michigan, Huron, Ontario, and Erie have followed in the years since

 

Claire Dion Fletcher

"From the moment of birth": Indigenous knowledge and ceremony in pregnancy and birth"

Session 1 

Time: 9:00-10:0am

Location: GCS 112

Session 2

Time: 2:45pm-4:15pm

Location: GCS 115

From the Moment of Birth:  Indigenous Knowledge & Ceremony in Pregnancy & Birth...The time of pregnancy and birth can be important points of reclaiming Indigenous culture. Drawing on Indigenous teachings including those of midwife Katsi Cook, this presentation will explore the importance of culture and ceremony surrounding birth in reclaiming identity; examining ways that families are incorporating Indigenous knowledge and ceremonies into pregnancy and birth in an urban setting.

Claire Dion Fletcher is a Potawatomi-Lenape Registered Midwife practicing in Toronto. She graduated from the Midwifery Education Program at Ryerson University, and is currently practicing at Seventh Generation Midwives Toronto. Claire is presently the Aboriginal Student Coordinator for the Ryerson Midwifery Education Program, Co-Chair of the Toronto Birth Centre Community Council and sits on the Core Leadership of the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives.

 

Edna Manitowabi

"Teachings of the Anishnaabe Water Drum

Session 1 

Time: 9:00am-10: 30am

Location: GCS 114

Session 2

Time2: 45pm-4: 15pm

Location: GCS117

Teachings of the Anishnaabe Drum...will share teachings of the Little Boy Water Drum.

(Odawa/Ojibway) from Wikwemikong First Nation

Professor Emeritus, Trent University

Edna Manitowabi is a gifted traditional signer, storyteller and Indigenous performance artist originally from Wikwemikong, Manitoulin Island. As Professor Emeritus in the Indigenous Studies Faculty, and as part of the Trent Traditional Council, she is called upon to lecture, and participate in workshops, conferences and symposiums within the undergraduate and graduate programs.  She is also known as a drum carrier and the keeper of the Little Boy Water Drum. Over the 25 years that Edna has committed to Trent University, numerous Trent students travelled across Canada to participate in Edna’s Medicine Camps committing themselves to learn about the traditional roles of plants and medicines under Edna’s guidance. Edna’s Medicine Camps are anther place of learning where Edna takes the university back to the land reconnecting learning and teaching to our mother.

Edna’s commitment to Indigenous education leadership helped shape Indigenous Studies at Trent, formed the University of Sudbury at Laurentian University and provided cultural direction for the Centre for Indigenous Theatre. More recently, in 2005, Edna’s longstanding commitment to building Indigenous performing arts and the local communities was fully realized in the creation Nozhem First Peoples Performance Space. Edna says, “NOZHEM is the Ojibway word which denotes the female bear. We’ve chosen this animal to represent our space because she embodies the characteristics of transformation, balance and knowledge, which are essential

components of the Indigenous way of knowing. In theatre there is transformation, which takes place as actors take on specific roles, but there is another transformation, which occurs within the individual actor as they find their own healing through their personal creative expression. There is also healing for the audience as they empathize greater awareness of the human condition and the situations of others in society.” Today, Nozhem is recognized internationally as an Indigenous performance space with a solid a reputation in Indigenous theatre and dance performance productions.

In 1970 Edna contributed to a CBC interview that for one of the first times in Canada shared publically the impact of the residential school system on the loss of Indigenous languages across Canada. Along with Delia Opekekew, Edna exposed never before heard truths about the Indian residential school system starting what would become a national conversation about the deep and multi-generational impacts of the residential school system on Indigenous Peoples today. As an educator, lecturer, medicine keeper and ceremonialist, Edna continues this work today, carrying and sharing Indigenous knowledge.

 

Professor David Newhouse

What is reconciliation? What does it promise? Should we be optimistic?

Session 1 

Time: 9:00am- 10:30am

Location: GCS 103

Session 2

Time: 1:00pm-2:30pm

Location: GCS 112

 

David Newhouse is Onondaga from the Six Nations of the Grand River community near Brantford, Ontario. He was the first Principal of the new Peter Gzowski College at Trent University and has been Chair of the Department of Indigenous Studies since 1993. He is also an Associate Professor in the Business Administration Program. Professor Newhouse was Co-Chair of the Trent Aboriginal Education Council for ten years. He was the IMC/U of S Aboriginal Scholar in Residence at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon in 1998/99. He also teaches in the Graduate CED Program at Concordia University. He has been a member of the Executive Committee of the Trent University Faculty Association for the past six years, serving for three years as President. He is the founding editor of the CANDO Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development the first peer-reviewed academic journal devoted to Aboriginal economic development issues. He is the pastChair and a current member of the Council for the Advancement of Native Development Officers (CANDO) Standing Committee on Education. He is currently National Director for the SSHRC ‘Urban Aboriginal Research Network’ project and co- director of Ontario-Quebec Region of the project with Kevin Fitzmaurice, from the University of Sudbury. He is also the Ontario lead for a 5 year CIHR research project on Aboriginal health, economic development and poverty with the Eabametoong First Nation and the Assembly of First Nations.

 

Journey the Beautiful Canoe: An Introduction 

Session 1 

Time: 1:00pm-2:30pm

Location: Nozhem Theatre

Workshop Summary: The Beautiful Canoe Collective, an Indigenous women’s theatre group, and dramaturge Monique Mojica, will present on the process of creating a multi-media theatre play focused on personal experiences of birth. The goal of creating a collaborative artistic expression of Indigenous birth experiences, is threefold; to personally (re)claim our own birthing narratives thereby healing from trauma; to (re)discover our traditional practices and ceremonies and to educate other indigenous peoples about (re)connecting to these traditional birthing practices. The workshop will include participatory theatre exercises and a short work-in-progress performance.
 

Monique Mojica

 

Monique Mojica (Guna and Rappahannock nations) Actor/ playwright Monique Mojica is passionately dedicated to a theatrical practice as an act of healing, of reclaiming historical/ cultural memory and of resistance. Spun directly from the family-web of New York’s Spiderwoman Theater, her theatrical practice embraces not only her artistic lineage through mining stories embeded in the body, but also the connection to stories coming through land and place. Monique’s first play Princess Pocahontas and the Blue Spots was produced in 1990 and is widely taught in curricula internationally. She was a co-founder of Turtle Gals Performance Ensemble with whom she created The Scrubbing Project, the Dora nominated The Triple Truth and The Only Good Indian. In 2007, she founded Chocolate Woman Collective to develop the play Chocolate Woman Dreams the Milky Way, a performance created by devising a dramaturgy specific to Guna cultural aesthetics, story narrative and literary structure. Monique has taught Indigenous Theatre in theory, process and practice at the University of Illinois, the Institute of American Indian Arts, McMaster University and is a former co- director of the Centre for Indigenous Theatre. She has lectured on embodied research and taught embodied performance workshops throughout Canada, the U.S., Latin America and Europe. 

She was most recently seen onstage in Kaha:wii Dance Theatre’s world premiere of Re-Quickening choreographed by Santee Smith and with the National Arts Centre Orchestra in I lost my Talk as part of the Life Relfected series. Upcoming projects include Side Show Freaks & Circus Injuns co-written with Choctaw playwright, LeAnne Howe and directed by Jorge Luis Morejón with an illustrious collaborative team of Indigenous artists from diverse disciplines.

Kerry Bebee 

Kerry Bebee is a Michi Saagiig Anishnaabekwe (Mississaga Ojibwe) with family heritage from Hiawatha First Nation, raised off-reserve in Nogojiwanong (Peterborough, ON). She is an Aboriginal registered midwife and performer within the community theatre scene. She is a graduate of Trent University and Ryerson University. She has worked as an Aboriginal registered midwife since January 2000 both in Ontario and Northern Manitoba. She has undertaken training with traditional Elders, midwives, and healers, growing gradually in working with botanical medicines. 

Kerry studied in the Indigenous Performing Arts program at Trent University beginning in 2004 under the supervision of Marrie Mumford. She studied acting, Aboriginal playwriting, mask, storytelling and song, and introduction to traditional and contemporary dance. She performed in Anishnaabe Maanjiidwin in 2004 as a “Pocahoney” (Princess Pocahontas and the Blue Spots) and as a dancer. 

She was a dancer, singer, and the Bingo Caller as well as an Assistant Director for the production of The Bingo Palace also by Tompson Highway in 2005. In 2006 she played Dickie Bird Hawked in Tompson Highway’s Dry Lips Otta Go to Kapuskasing all at Nozhem Theatre, Peterborough, Ontario. In 2007, she played the part of Lone Ranger in a short adaptation of Green Grass, Running Water from the novel by Thomas King as well as acting as an Assistant Director for Anishinaabe Maanjiidwin V. More recently, she was Assistant Director and played the part of the Deer and as a narrator in the production of Two Gardens produced by William Kingfisher at Curve Lake First Nation in September 2013. She also has experience in staged readings such as the staged reading of the play Where We Began by Tasha Beeds performed at the March 2013 Indigenous Women’s Symposium. She is also mother to the busy and creative Quinn Aptoo-Giizhik. 

Norma Papalotl Araiza 

Norma Araiza is a multi disciplinary performer/choreographer/instructor of Yoeme (Yaqui) descend, originally from Mexico. She has studied different disciplines within the arts in order to find her own unique style that blends dance, theatre, vocals, percussion, and storytelling with cultural and traditional themes especially from her Indigenous background. 

Araiza has studied with international theatre directors Jerzy Grotowski and Eugenio Barba, Butoh Master Natsu Nakajima, theatre group Tascabile di Bergamo from Italy, Kei Takei from New York, Pol Pelletier from Montreal, Charles Koroneho, among others. 

She has performed extensively as a professional physical theatre actor and dancer throughout Mexico and Ontario, California, Toronto, Montreal, Hungary, Colombia. She founded Creando Huecos Company in 1986 and co-founded Tolmec Dance Theatre in 1988 in Mexico City. She worked as an assistant director, choreographer, dance theatre performer, and researcher at the National University of Mexico in the Laboratory of Performing Arts for 4 years, and danced 

professionally in various independent, contemporary dance companies. She toured extensively throughout Mexico with the Children's Theatre Company “Pácatelas” until she came to Canada. 

At present Araiza is artistic director of Tolmec Dance Theatre, an independent Toronto-based group working primarily with culturally specific themes through the medium of dance theatre. She is also a member of Vanguardia Dance Projects, a collective presenting and promoting contemporary dance by Indigenous and Latin American artists, and cultural events. She is greatly involved in community arts. She has completed her Master's Degree in Dance Ethnology at York University where she has taught for several years, and graduated from the Expressive Arts Therapy Program at CREATE Institute (formerly ISIS-Canada). Araiza is currently working at Hospice Toronto as the head of the Expressive Arts Therapy Program, and teaching Indigenous Dance Theatre and Drama at various high schools throughout Toronto. 

Araiza has presented her work at many different venues in the Toronto area and in Ontario. She has collaborated in theatre projects with the Canadian Stage/Hour Company, L&L Productions, Inner Stage Theatre, Modern Times Theatre Productions, Leading Tone Arts Productions, Dancing Earth, among others, as a choreographer, actors’ coach and performer. She has also collaborated with Indigenous artists such as Alejandro Ronceria, Rulan Tangen, Daystar/Rosalie Jones, William Kingfisher, Mayahuel Tecozautla, Monique Mojica. 

Urpi Pine 

Urpi is of mixed Quechua/Mi’kmaq/French heritage and grew up in Toronto Ontario. She completed her BA at Trent University in Native Studies in 2005, during which she also studied Indigenous theatre with Marrie Mumford. During her time in Indigenous Theatre, she formed a collective with other Native theatre students called the ‘Pocahoney(s)’ and performed in the end of the year Anishinaabe Manjiidwin theatre production. 

After completing her BA. she went on to get an M.Ed in Counselling Psychology with an Em- phasis in Aboriginal Health from Ontario Institute for Studies in Education where she completed her thesis on the role of theatre in healing. She is also in the process of completing her Doula certification and runs support circles for new mothers. 

From 2005 to present, she acts as the director and founding member of Seven Directions, a non-profit organization dedicated to sustainable living practices and decolonization of Indigenous life ways. Seven Directions is currently opening a centre for Indigenous healing and reclamation through art and recently obtained funding from the Ontario Arts Council to run a traditional hide tanning course which ran in August 2014. 

Urpi is also a traditional hand-drum singer as well as vocalist with her partner who performs at local community events. In 2013, they performed traditional hand-drum songs in the Lost Rivers film and water walk. 

Mapu Graner (Mapuchedub) 

Mapuchedub is Toronto born and is of Mapuche and Quechua ancestry. She is a mother of two children that are her inspiration. She is recognized for her Aztec dance and has performed and facilitated workshops at various events across Canada. 

In the mid 90’s she travelled to south America to reconnect to her roots. This journey paved the foundation of her future work with Indigenous people worldwide. She is the creator and writer of an online comic about the connections between African and indigenous communities in Bolivia and the sacred medicine, Coca. 

Mapuchedub has contributed photography and design to IR Indigenous Resistance and The Fire This Time videos: Journey to Sosolakam, I love da Future and La Revoluta. She also contributed to the creation of the award winning multimedia piece, Dub Navigation. She is also an active member of 7 Directions, a land-based project which supports Indigenous cultural renewal. 

Lena Recollet 

Lena is Anishinaabe from Wikwemikong First Nation. She is a graduate of the Centre of Indigenous Theatre and has acted in various plays, including Tomson Highway’s, The Rez Sisters, and Marie Clement’s, The Unnatural and Accidental Women. She is a multi-disciplinary artist and is talented, driven and a vibrant singer/songwriter. Captivating with powerful lyrics, sultry spoken word and her poetry is bold in its lure. What makes her unique is her willingness to push herself beyond her limits, and on occasion rise to the occasional live improvisation. 

She has had mentorship by established artist in her community such as Digging Roots, Martha Redbone and Buffy Sainte Marie. 

She has created her own costumes for her shows and performances, sold paintings for fundraisers, continues to write and direct short films. 

She performs stand-up comedy and is also part of the all Indigenous women’s comedy group Manifest Destiny’s Child. She recently completed a series of four poetry videos.

Skahendowaneh Swamp

 

Session: Earth Sounds Haudenosaunee Social Dancing

 

Session 1 

Time: 9:00am- 10:30am

Location: GCS 105

 

Originally from Akwesasne, Mr. Swamp is highly respected for his knowledge of Aboriginal languages and cultural traditions and has spent many years teaching in various communities in Ontario and Quebec.Prior to coming to Trent, he taught soapstone carving and painting through the Akwesasne Child and Family Services where he worked as a traditional support worker. At Trent he also gave lectures on aspects of culture, dancing, stories, and traditional teachings. Before that, he lived on Six Nations Reserve near Brantford, Ontario for four years with his wife, who is an Oneida from this community. At Six Nations he taught the Mohawk language, music and art in Native studios at the Kawenní:io/Gawení:yo High School, which he described as a challenge because there were no textbooks, requiring him to be creative and develop new teaching skills which he continues to use at Trent. In addition to his fluency in Mohawk, Mr. Swamp also understands Oneida, Cayuga and Onondaga, and can read Seneca.

Skahendowaneh Swamp

Session: Earth Sounds Haudenosaunee Social Dancing

Session 1 

Time: 9:00am- 10:30am

Location: GCS 105

 

Originally from Akwesasne, Mr. Swamp is highly respected for his knowledge of Aboriginal languages and cultural traditions and has spent many years teaching in various communities in Ontario and Quebec.Prior to coming to Trent, he taught soapstone carving and painting through the Akwesasne Child and Family Services where he worked as a traditional support worker. At Trent he also gave lectures on aspects of culture, dancing, stories, and traditional teachings. Before that, he lived on Six Nations Reserve near Brantford, Ontario for four years with his wife, who is an Oneida from this community. At Six Nations he taught the Mohawk language, music and art in Native studios at the Kawenní:io/Gawení:yo High School, which he described as a challenge because there were no textbooks, requiring him to be creative and develop new teaching skills which he continues to use at Trent. In addition to his fluency in Mohawk, Mr. Swamp also understands Oneida, Cayuga and Onondaga, and can read Seneca.

 

Sunday Panel: Water Walker Panel

Time: 9:00am-13:30am

Location: GCS 114

 

Gchi-twaa Nibi: Sacred Water Circle

United Walkers

Nibi Emosaawdamojig  (Those that Walk for Water)

World Water Day was introduced in 1992 by the United Nations. For Indigenous people such as First Nations and especially Anishinaabe-kweg, (women,) water has always been sacred to us and has always been part of many of native our ceremonies.

In spring 2009, a group of women began walking around the Kawartha Lakes area, near Peterborough, Ontario, Canada to raise public awareness that local waters have become sick and that we should help in any way we can to clean them up, because water is sacred and without water, we cannot live. Four walks were planned and done and after on the 4th walk, the women walkers decided that we should do seven spring walks to make it for the seven generations.

This presentation will include a power point, which talks about the water walks that the First Nations women have done and to tell the state of the water pollution in the area and what we can do. Shirley Williams:  will talk about Anishinaabe-kweg some water teachings, the water walks that they have done and who inspired them. We bring awareness to the people and communities so that we can become better water stewards for life. The Creator has given us many things and we must take care of it.

Josephine Mandamin:In the spring of 2012, Josephine Mandamin, an Anishinabe elder originally from the Wikwemikong Unceded Reservation on Manitoulin Island in northern Ontario, will receive her bachelor of arts from Sault Ste. Marie’s Algoma University. But when it comes to water conservation and the role that aboriginal women can play in those efforts, she’s long been the one doing the teaching. Since 2003, Mandamin has led the annual Women’s Water Walk, which began with the circumnavigation of Lake Superior. Walks around Lakes Michigan, Huron, Ontario, and Erie have followed in the years since.

Dorothy Taylor is a Mississauga Ojibwe Elder from Curve Lake First Nation.  She is known for her work and traditional teachings about the sacredness of water. She is asked to share traditional knowledge and ceremony within her community and various organizations throughout Peterborough and surrounding area.  She is a hand drummer and singer.  Elder Dorothy Taylor is the founder of the Sacred Water Circle, inspired by traditional Indigenous teachings and leading with hope and spiritual courage, the Sacred Water Circle sees a restored relationship between human communities and water.  She is a member of the Trent University, Indigenous Studies Department, and Traditional Advisory Council.  She has served as a volunteer on the Petroglyph Advisory Council of Curve Lake for 12 years. She lives in Curve Lake with her husband Mark and two teenage sons.

Tasha Beeds is a faculty member at Fleming College and a Ph.D. Candidate in the Indigenous Studies Department at Trent University under the direction of Metis writer/activist and knowledge keeper Maria Campbell and Algonquin scholar Dr. Paula Sherman. She received a SSHRC CGS scholarship for her work, which focuses on re-energizing existing nêhiyaw knowledge paradigms into contemporary frameworks to address issues such as Indigenous gender violence.  Since moving to the territories of the Mississauga, she has had the opportunity to work with and learn from Anishinaabe Elders Edna Manitowabi, Shirley Williams, and Doug Williams as well as Knowledge Keepers Liz Osawamick, Georgina Cowie-Rogers, and Paul Bourgeois. She has walked for the Water in Ceremony under the guidance of Anishinaabekwewag Water Walkers Josephine Mandamin, Shirley Williams, and Liz Osawamick for the past 5 years and will walk again this year in the 2017 Earth and For the Waters Walk: From West to East. Tasha has articles in the anthologies Me Funny, Indigenous Poetics and Mixed Race Women Speak Out. Her work has also appeared on rabble.ca and the Indigenous Nationhood Movement as well as in Matrix Magazine and the Canadian Journal of Poetry.

 

Liz Osawamick:

Elizabeth (Liz) Osawamik has been instrumental in community engagement work for the Peterborough area.  She is a fluent speaker of the Nishnaabemowin Language, knows the writing system and has been mentored by those Elders and community people who are her ancestors in this field of study and revitalization. Liz works tirelessly to assure the continuation and health of the language, she is Midewiwin and continues to progress in that study and practice as well. Her family, which consist of children, grandchildren and adoptive children, include one of her own who is deaf and two of her adoptive children who are also deaf.  Her own, Miigwaas, has become a very talented teacher and leader although he is very young and still in highschool, and the two very young children who she cares for are more and more becoming comfortable and more relaxed in the community and accustomed to participating in the many activities to which Liz exposes them to a variety of community activities on a regular basis.  This is one of the Creator’s tasks given to those who are capable of it, to raise a child other than their own. Her work which includes teaching the language, the culture and supporting the Elders and their initiatives, in a variety of venues, including the public school board, the university and college, now includes being the President of Anishnaabemowen Teq Inc, the main language sustainer in the province and broader language geography which is associated with Nishnaabemowin. Liz has also led the annual Water Walk for the past 7 years and for the coming years which Water Walks take place under the guidance of Elders Shirley Williams and Josephine Mandamin both of whom have been her teachers as she walks and who now leads all the others.This gives little idea of the breadth and depth of the contributions which Liz has and continues to make to the Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities in this area as well as in Ontario and beyond.Her stature as a loving, caring and talented woman is exceeded only by her generosity of spirit and her mind.

 

 

 

Georgie Horton-Baptiste :Georgie is a Saulteaux Anishinaabe Ikwe, Atik Doodem, with ancestral roots in the Manitou Rapids Rainy River area in Treaty 3.  She grew up in the Bancroft-Peterborough area and has been a part of the local urban Indigenous community for the past 17 years. More recently, she has returned to and embraced her Anishinaabe cultural roots and identity.  Georgie is an Electrical CAD Technician by trade, a photographer and dreamer at leisure, and a Water Walker by accident. After receiving an invitation to participate in the first water walk in 2010, she said ‘yes’ without knowing what it truly meant.  Since then, her role in the Annual Water Awareness Walks in the Kawarthas has been map maker, timekeeper, picture-taker and logistics planner.

 

 

 

Learn By Doing Workshops

Andrew Bullock

Andrew Bullock is a lifelong beadwork researcher. Of Wampanoag ancestry, he has been creating and restoring Indigenous beadwork for decades. This award-winning craftsman has been featured in numerous exhibits including "Reading Native Art" at Mt Kearsarge Indian Museum. His work can also be found at Robbins Museum of Archaeology, and in private collections. As a Trent University Alumni, Andy has facilitated Traditional Teaching and workshops at Trent University, University of Ontario Institute of Technology and the Canadian Canoe Museum. His professional experience includes founding and being the past owner of Wandering Bull, Inc., a supply house featuring top quality beadwork, supplies and reference material.

As for the workshop, I will have a basic project planned using single needle applique technique.  Participants will learn the basics of designing and executing a small medallion.  Once complete, the medallion can be sewn onto a garment or incorporated into a necklace.  As time allows, we will discuss varieties of bead weaving techniques as employed on garments from throughout North America, Emphasis will be placed on   Communicating Cultural Identity Through Beadwork.

 

Cherylanne James

Art and Storytelling Creation

The four pieces will incorporate art and storytelling centered on nibi and culture. Indigenous youth, under 30, will be invited to create and share a little piece of how they envision and center water within their own world perspective. Each of the four canvases will only be guided by particular colours, the rest is open to youth creating on their own. My role is to engage youth to add to the pieces.

It will be an all-day event and the pieces will be presented to FPHL as a gift at the end of the Elder’s Gathering. I would like to show this piece at the art show at the end of March, which is a part of my Master’s work. It will be returned when it’s done.

 

Skahendowaneh Swamp

Session: Earth Sounds Haudenosaunee Social Dancing

Session 1 

Time: 9:00am- 10:30am

Location: GCS 105

 

Originally from Akwesasne, Mr. Swamp is highly respected for his knowledge of Aboriginal languages and cultural traditions and has spent many years teaching in various communities in Ontario and Quebec.Prior to coming to Trent, he taught soapstone carving and painting through the Akwesasne Child and Family Services where he worked as a traditional support worker. At Trent he also gave lectures on aspects of culture, dancing, stories, and traditional teachings. Before that, he lived on Six Nations Reserve near Brantford, Ontario for four years with his wife, who is an Oneida from this community. At Six Nations he taught the Mohawk language, music and art in Native studios at the Kawenní:io/Gawení:yo High School, which he described as a challenge because there were no textbooks, requiring him to be creative and develop new teaching skills which he continues to use at Trent. In addition to his fluency in Mohawk, Mr. Swamp also understands Oneida, Cayuga and Onondaga, and can read Seneca.