Canadian

Héritage Project

Availability: 
Description: 

Héritage Project is a 10-year initiative to digitize and make accessible online some of Canada’s most popular archival collections encompassing roughly 60 million pages of primary-source documents. Chronicling the country and its people from the 1600s to the mid-1900s, this collection represents a vast and unique resource for Canadian historians, students, and genealogists. The types of material in the project include:

  • geneaology material, including immigration records, church records, land records, family histories and papers, voters’ lists, etc.
  • documents relating to Canada's aboriginal peoples
  • records from the core government departments
  • documents related to Canada's military history
  • papers from prominent Canadians and organizations

The project is still in the process of digitizing some material in the H, C or T category of microfilms. You can check Library and Archives Canada's online Mikan database to verify the category of an item. The Conditions of Access area of a catalogue record will list the microfilms that make up a collection. If you find a specific reel or reels that you believe should be on Héritage you can contact LAC at info@canadiana.ca and inquire about the status of the reel. It could be that the reel:

  • has been digitized but is not online yet
  • should have been digitized, but was accidentally missed
  • cannot be digitized due to copyright privacy issues

In either of the first two cases efforts will be made to make digitized reel available as quickly as possible.

Users should note that due to the volume of digitization minimal metadata was used for most of the collection. For a detailed list of which collections have metadata, see here. You can also check Héritage news, or subscribe to our an e-Bulletin, for updates.

On finding aids, note that if there is a finding aid available, Héritage does try to mention this in the cataloguing record. Not all collections have finding aids, and for those that do, many are still only in paper format. Library and Archives Canada is working on digitizing their finding aids and adding them to their Mikan records, available on their site.

For more information see the Frequently-Asked Questions at the Héritage Project website.

Coverage: 
1600s to 1900s
Update Frequency: 
Material is still being digitized. Check the site for updates.

Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online

Availability: 
Resource Type: 
Description: 

For the most part, the biographies that appear in the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online reproduce those that were originally commissioned by the Dictionary of Canadian Biography for its print version and were republished, some with minor corrections, in the Dictionary of Canadian Biography, Volumes I-XIV. A selection of biographies from unpublished volumes is also included. The Dictionary of Canadian Biography, whose first volume appeared in 1966, is a joint project of the University of Toronto and the Université Laval and presents the work of researchers and writers in many fields from across Canada and around the world.

(from Background)

Notes: 

Persons have been entered under family name rather than title, married name, pseudonym, stage name, popular name, nickname, or name in religion: Donald Alexander Smith, 1st Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal; Florence Daly Lucas (Thompson); Louis Gonnet, named Brother Réticius; Marie-Françoise Huot, named Sainte Gertrude. Where possible the form of the surname is based on the signature, although contemporary usage is taken into account. Common variant spellings are included in parenthesis.

Names of aboriginal people have presented a particular problem, since a person might be known by his/her own name (written in a variety of ways by people unfamiliar with aboriginal languages) and by a nickname or baptismal name. Moreover, some aboriginal families, such as the Copes [see John Noel Cope], adopted family surnames. Aboriginal names have been used when they could be found, and, because it is impossible to establish original spellings, the form generally chosen is the one found in standard sources at the time of original publication; variants are included in parenthesis: Ahchuchwahauhhatohapit (Ahchacoosacootacoopits, Star Blanket). Métis, unless they remained wholly within aboriginal cultures, are entered under their "European" name: Louis Guiboche. To assist readers who go back to contemporary documents, the names of aboriginal bands have been given in a form likely to be found in those documents.

(from Help)

Coverage: 
Up to 1930
Update Frequency: 
Not currently updated. The print editions are updated annually. Call number: F 5009 .D53 Ref.

e-CPS (Canadian Pharmacists Association)

Subject Area: 
Availability: 
Description: 

The e-CPS is the Canadian Pharmacists Association's online Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties. The e-CPS contains thousands of Health Canada–approved drug monographs, links to Health Canada advisories, printable information for patients, searchable product images and more.

Notes: 

For more information on how to use this resource click here.

Note: When you login to this resource you may be presented with the security message:

”There is a problem with this website's security certificate.” Unfortunately we cannot get around this message so please disregard it and click on the option, “Continue to this website (not recommended).”

Update Frequency: 
Ongoing

Early Canadiana Online

Availability: 
Description: 

Early Canadiana Online (ECO) is a full text online collection of books and pamphlets documenting Canadian history from the first European contact to the late 19th century. The collection is particularly strong in literature, women's history, native studies, travel and exploration, and the history of French Canada.

Early Canadiana Online (ECO) is a digital library providing access to 2,008,165 pages of Canada's printed heritage. It features works published from the time of the first European settlers up to the early 20th Century.

ECO is produced by the Canadian Institute for Historical Microreproductions (CIHM), a nonprofit organization for preserving and providing access to early Canadian publications, first on microfiche and now online.

ECO began in 1997 as a pilot project to create an online digital library. Over three years, 550,000 pages of text were taken from the CIHM's microfiche collection and scanned into digital images. This part of the collection remains free and accessible to the general public.

The second phase of ECO began in 2000 and is scheduled to continue to 2004. During this time, 1,250,000 pages of colonial, federal, and provincial government publications will be scanned and published. This portion of the collection is available to all registered ECO members.

Along the way, a few special projects have also been added to the collection. These include 20,000 pages of text detailing the history of Hudson's Bay Company, and 22,500 pages of Jesuit Relations texts, translated into English by Reuben Thwaites. These collections are also accessible to the general public.

Individual collections include Canadian Women's History, Colonial Government Journals, The Early Governors General of Canada, Early Official Publications, English Canadian Literature, History of French Canada, Hudson's Bay, Jesuit Relations, and Native Studies.

Notes: 

Part of the collection is available without a subscription; Trent subscribes to the entire collection.

Coverage: 
1500 -
Update Frequency: 
Irregularly

Érudit

Availability: 
Description: 

Érudit is a multi-institutional publishing consortium comprised of the Université de Montréal, the Université Laval and the Université du Québec à Montréal that was founded in 1998. It is a non-profit society that offers an innovative model for the promotion and dissemination of Canadian research. It is also one of the five editorial production nodes of Synergies, a national project whose objective is to digitize Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities research.

The consortium Érudit scholarly journals collection includes 59 subscription journals, all of which are licensed by CRKN. The journals are mainly published in French; however there are a few bilingual and English titles.

In addition, Érudit publishes and distributes the following 9 open access journals:

  • Cahiers québécois de démographie
  • Cuizine
  • Drogues, santé et société
  • Enfances, Familles, Générations
  • Environnement urbain / Urban Environment
  • McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l’éducation de McGill
  • Psychiatrie et violence
  • Revue québécoise de linguistique
  • Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net
Notes: 

Available through a CRKN agreement for three years from signing of agreement. Renewed Sep 2011.

Coverage: 
Varies by journal.
Update Frequency: 
Ongoing.

Globe and Mail (1844-2011)

Availability: 
Description: 

The Globe and Mail (1844-2009) is Canada's National Newspaper, daily offering over a million readers from coast to coast unparalleled national, international and business reporting, analysis and commentary.

It’s the deepest and most extensive online historic newspaper archive in Canada and includes every news story, photograph, map, advertisement, classified ad, political cartoon, birth and death notice, and more. The breadth and depth of content make it a vital and convenient research tool for educators, librarians and all researchers. (from the website)

This resource offers the full-page archive of the Globe and Mail newspaper dating back to the pre-Confederation era. This image-rich database brings the entire archive of Canada's National Newspaper to your desktop in seconds.

Notes: 

Each page is presented in .pdf format, with the search term highlighted.

For access to current or recent Globe & Mail content, see Newspapers at Trent Library.

Coverage: 
1844-200?

Repère

Availability: 
Description: 

This database indexes approximately 600 French language journals with some full-text availability. Journals indexed are from Québec, elsewhere in French-speaking Canada, France, Belgium, and Switzerland. Repère includes the full-text of about 50 Québec journals. There are currently about 410,000 entries in total with coverage from about 1980 onwards.

For a description in French click here.

Notes: 

Search options are:
Basic (Simple)
String starting with (Commence par…)
Advanced (Élaborée) – includes limit by material audience and place of publication

The red arrow starts your search (lancer or modifier).
Note that the second subject search box says “vedettes-matière” this is a controlled vocabulary subject heading (like LCSH but for French).
When you get a hit for full-text there is the phrase “Texte integral:” at the end of the citation, with either an image of a book (Repère), or a book with a globe (Internet).
When you go to the citation “Version imprimable” is the print-friendly option.

Coverage: 
1980 - Current.

ProQuest

Availability: 
Description: 

The ProQuest search has replaced the former Scholars Portal Search, and most databases are available through ProQuest now. Trent currently subscribes to:

  • BioOne
  • CBCA (Canadian Business & Current Affairs)
  • ERIC (Education Resources)
  • GenderWatch
  • ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Globe & Mail 1844-2011
  • Philosopher's Index
  • PILOTS (traumatic stres)
    • Proquest Dissertations and Theses
      • ProQuest Education Journals
      • ProQuest Nursing Journals
      • ProQuest Sociology
      • PsycARTICLES
      • PsycINFO
      • Social Services Abstracts
      • Sociological Abstracts

      You can select specific databases to search and see descriptions of each, using the blue bar at the top of the screen: click "Change".

      Notes: 

      Where there are no direct links to full text, use to locate full-text availability.

      Coverage: 
      Varies depending on the database.
      Update Frequency: 
      Varies by database.
      Stable URL: 

      A stable url (or persistent link) is a link that connects a user to a particular item in a database or on the web.

      When you have full record for an item, look for "Document URL" at the bottom. Check to see if the the proxy prefix is included. Copy this link for a stable url. See the image below:

      Some ProQuest databases use the doi system to create a stable link.

      To link to a particular article via doi, look for the line that provides a doi and use it create a link.

      Example:
      DOI: 10.1016/j.asr.2009.02.013
      Link: http://web2.trentu.ca:2048/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asr.2009.02.013

      To ensure off-campus access, include the proxy prefix:
      http://web2.trentu.ca:2048/login?url=

      Since this database also contains links to Get it Trent! you can use the "Save Citation" data to create a link to the article.

      ODESI

      Availability: 
      Resource Type: 
      Description: 

      (Ontario Data Documentation, Extraction Service and Infrastructure) is a growing data resource that will include Statistics Canada datasets released through DLI (e.g. Census, PUMFs, Special Surveys, General Social Surveys, Health Surveys) , public opinion data (e.g. Gallup Canada, POLLARA, Listening to Canadians, Centre for Research and Information on Canada), public-domain files such as the Canadian National Election Surveys and selected files from the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR).

      Data can be searched, analysed and extracted. Tables can be saved in Excel or Adobe format. Full datasets or subsets can be downloaded into statistical packages (SPSS, SAS, STATA, Statistica, etc.).

      Update Frequency: 
      Ongoing
      Stable URL: 

      A stable url (or persistent link) is a link that connects a user to a particular item in a database or on the web. This database uses the doi system to create a stable link.

      To link to a particular article, look for the line that says:
      To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/####.###.

      To ensure off-campus access, include the proxy prefix:
      http://web2.trentu.ca:2048/login?url=

      Example: http://web2.trentu.ca:2048/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbbm.2007.04.008

      National Film Board Online Screening Room

      Availability: 
      Resource Type: 
      Description: 

      For over 70 years the National Film Board of Canada has been creating documentaries, films and animations. Now they are providing streaming video access to almost 3,000 films, clips and trailers from the NFB collection via their website.

      Some films are public, but others require a subscription; use the link from our library homepages for access to all the content we pay for.  Or, search TOPCAT to find the videos we have access to.

      Trent also subscribes to CAMPUS, the media tool for educators. This includes more than 500 top educational films, educational resources like teaching guides and tools that allow you to create your own clips and playlists.

      Access to CAMPUS features requires a personal account. Create your own account:

      • Go to nfb.ca/education and create a profile (or login to your existing profile, if you have one already) by clicking on sign in.
      • On the next page, for "Find your school" search for Trent University, select it, and click "Continue".
      • Click on the link to "Education".
      • From now on, you can log in to your account any time you wish and view NFB titles under our campus license.
      Notes: 

      See the Mobile Access information for NFB.

      Most of the videos available on this site can be found by searching TOPCAT, which provides a link to the video.

      Trent has purchased the performance rights to access these video resources for classroom use.

      Coverage: 
      Varies.
      Update Frequency: 
      Irregular.
      Stable URL: 

      A stable url (or persistent link) is a link that connects a user to a particular item in a database or on the web.

      NFB Online Screening Room provides a unique url for each video, which you can copy from the "address" bar and use later.

      Pages

      Creating the Library of the Future - Details about our exciting transformation