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Academic information & Regulations

Academic Sessions
    The academic year is divided into two “sessions”: the Fall/Winter session (normally beginning in September and ending in April) and the summer session (normally beginning in May and ending in August). The Fall/Winter session contains full-courses which are offered from September to April, Fall-term courses which are offered from September to December, and Winter-term courses which are offered from January to April. The Fall and Winter terms last for 12 weeks each, and contain a one-week reading break in each term.
        The Summer session begins in May and is completed in August. This session is comprised of one twelve-week term (or two six-week terms).
        The University offers field schools in archaeology and field courses in Biology, Geography and Indigenous Studies in the Summer session. Details of these courses are available from the departments concerned.

Academic Load
    For many academic purposes, a student registered in 3.5 credits or more is considered ‘full-time’ and in 3 credits or fewer as ‘part-time’. This definition also applies when students are billed for tuition fees. It is not, however, the same definition that may be used for other purposes, and students are advised to check with the administrative office when determining their status.

Access to Instruction
    It is Trent University’s intent to create an inclusive learning environment. If a student has a disability and/or health consideration and feels that he/she may need accommodations to succeed in a course, the student should contact the Disability Services Office (BL Suite 109, 748-1281, disabilityservices@trentu.ca) as soon as possible.
        Disabilities include (but are not limited to) neurological impairment, orthopedic/mobility impairment, traumatic brain injury, sensory impairment (visual, hearing, etc.), chronic medical conditions, emotional/psychological disabilities, attention deficit disorder and learning disabilities.
        To allow students with disabilities to actively and freely participate in courses, every reasonable effort will be made to provide appropriate accommodations as outlined by the Disability Services Office.
        A student’s desire for anonymity is of utmost importance and confidentiality will be respected.

Change of Name
    The Office of the Registrar is committed to the integrity of its student records. Each student is therefore required to provide, either on application for admission or in personal data required for registration, his/her legal name. Any requests to change a name, by means of alteration or deletion, substitution or addition, must be accompanied by appropriate supporting documentation. Upon making application to graduate, a student may be asked to provide legal documentation as proof of his/her name.

Change of Address
    It is the student’s responsibility to maintain current and up-to-date mailing address, e-mail and contact information on the records of the University in order to receive pertinent mailings, including Tuition and Education Credit Certificates etc. Address changes and updates to contact information may be done through myTrent.

Course Numbering
    Courses listed in this Calendar follow the form: SUBJ 1000 or SUBJ 100. SUBJ refers to the department offering the course. The course number may be a 3- or 4-digit number. The first digit refers to the level of the course.

    Re-numberings
        The University is in the process of moving to a four-digit numbering system for all courses offered at the undergraduate level. Please consult course descriptions for new numberings. The old three-digit course number appears as an exclusion. Wherever a course is required as a pre- or co-requisite, the old three-digit number appears in parentheses after the new four-digit course number.

Course Credits
    Each course number is followed by a letter suffix which denotes the credit value of that course.


Suffix

Credit Value

H

0.5 credit (or half-credit)

Y

1.0 credit (or full-credit)
Three-digit courses which are full credits will not have the Y suffix.

D

2.0 credits (or double-credit)

Q

0.25 credit (or quarter-credit), for School of Education courses

C

1.5 credits, for Nursing courses

Cross-listed Courses
    Many courses are cross-listed, that is, they are offered jointly by two or more departments. Cross-listed courses may not be double-counted in order to fulfill degree requirements. For example CAST 201 is cross-listed with POST 201; it may be counted for credit as a Canadian Studies course or as a Politics course, but not as both.

Definition of Year
    A student’s progress towards a degree is measured in terms of credits passed rather than years of study completed. Where it is necessary or helpful to equate credits passed with years of study, the following table may be used:


Credits completed

Year Equivalent

4.5 or fewer credits
5.0 to 9.5 credits
10 to 14.5 credits
15 credits or more

1
2
3
4

E-mail Accounts
    At the time of first registration at the University, students are issued a Trent user id and password and a Trent e-mail account. The Trent e-mail account is considered the official e-mail account and will be used to communicate with students. Students are responsible for ensuring that they monitor and maintain their Trent e-mail account. Students should be aware that e-mails from non-Trent accounts may not be considered official.

Grades and Grading Schemes
    Courses are graded on a percentage scale, except for courses taken under a pass/fail option. Averages are calculated using the percentage grade assigned to the student for each course.

Grading Criteria
The final grade in a course is based on at least some of the following criteria:
            •   in-term oral and written work
            •   in-term or mid-year tests or examinations
            •   final examinations
            •   practicums and community-based projects.
    Normally at least 25% of the grade in an undergraduate half-year course offered in the regular academic session must be determined and made available by the deadline for withdrawal without academic penalty. For full-year undergraduate courses, at least 25% of the grade must normally be determined and made available before the mid-year review in January.
        No final examination is worth more than 50% of the final grade. Instructors are encouraged not to base final grades entirely on tests and examinations.

Numerical Equivalents of Letter Grades
    A+  90 – 100%    B+  77 – 79%      C+  67 – 69%     D+ 57 – 59%       F  0 – 49%
    A    85 – 89%       B    73 – 76%      C    63 – 66%      D   53 – 56%
    A-  80 – 84%       B-   70 – 72%      C-   60 – 62%      D-  50 – 52%

Course Repeats
The University does not have a limit on the number of times a course can be repeated, except for students enrolled in the Trent/Fleming School of Nursing program. Nursing students will only be allowed to repeat one theory course to raise their grade to 60% or higher and one practice course to obtain a pass.
   All attempts will appear on the students’ academic records, but no more than one attempt will be assigned credit. The attempt with the highest grade will be used to determine the cumulative average.

Grade Reports
    Grades are posted on myTrent as soon as possible after the completion of the course and students may print an unofficial grade report from this source. Students who require an official copy of their grade report must submit a request in writing and include payment to the Office of the Registrar at the completion of the session. Note that students with an outstanding financial obligation to the University will be unable to view their grades on myTrent and will not receive a certified official grade report until the financial obligation has been paid.

Course Syllabuses
    Each course has a syllabus which includes the method of assessment and the grading scheme.
    In some cases an instructor may judge that certain regulations are inappropriate for a particular course and may be granted a formal exemption from them by the Dean of Arts and Science. Any such exemptions will be noted in the course syllabus.
    The instructor reviews the syllabus with the students at the first class in the course. Any change thereafter in the grading scheme must be agreed to in writing by all students present at a subsequent class; at the class immediately following that one the revised section of the syllabus must be posted or otherwise communicated.

Course Overload
    Course overload is defined as enrolment in more than five credits in the Fall/Winter session or enrolment in more than 2.5 credits (or equivalent) during the Fall session or the Winter session.
    Students require approval for course overload. Full-time students with at least a 70% average over a minimum of the five most recent Trent University credits will be granted their request upon submission of a completed Course Overload Request Form to the Office of the Registrar. Students whose current average is less than 70% on their most recent 5 full Trent credits must petition the Committee on Undergraduate Petitions for approval of course overload.

Letters of Permission
Students registered in an undergraduate degree program at Trent University may, with certain conditions, be permitted to take undergraduate courses at other universities as credits towards their Trent University degree. Students must obtain a Letter of Permission from the Office of the Registrar prior to registering in courses at another university. Credits obtained on a Letter of Permission will be recorded by Trent as a “pass” or “fail” on the student’s record.
        To obtain a Letter of Permission, students must be in good academic standing, as noted on their most recent grade report. The following conditions apply:
Students must have an average of at least 60% on a minimum of 3.0 credits completed at Trent, or
Students in first year and/or students who have transferred to Trent University must have an average of 60% on their mid-year marks and have a passing grade on the majority of their courses. If no mid-year marks are available, an assessment will be made based on prior post-secondary marks (e.g., other university or community college)
Students must not currently be on academic probation or be on suspension from Trent University or any other institution

Restrictions
Students may take a maximum of two credits in a summer session, including courses at another university on a Letter of Permission
No more than five credits may be completed on a Letter of Permission. (For transfer students this number may be lower, depending on how many transfer credits they have received.)
The total number of non-Trent credits in an Honours program may not exceed 10. The total number of non-Trent credits in a General program may not exceed 7.5.
Five of the last seven credits obtained by a candidate for a Trent University degree must be completed at Trent.

Notes
Students who obtain a Letter of Permission should register at the host university as a Visiting Student rather than as a student in a degree program. Students who register in a degree program will jeopardize their registration status at Trent and will need to apply for re-admission. A Letter of Permission issued to a student who subsequently transfers to another post-secondary institution will be considered null and void.
Students who are granted a Letter of Permission to complete the final course(s) of their program at another university during the Fall-Winter Session and intend to graduate in the Spring Convocation, must provide grades to the Office of the Registrar in the form of an official transcript by May 1 in order to ensure that their names appear in the Convocation Program and that their diplomas are printed for the day of the ceremony. Students who are granted a Letter of Permission to complete the final course(s) of their program at another university during the Summer Session and intend to graduate in the Fall must submit an official transcript to the Office of the Registrar as soon as possible after completion of the course for inclusion in the next Convocation Roll to Senate.

Official Results of Letter of Permission
Students are required to make arrangements to have an official transcript forwarded to the Office of the Registrar upon completion of the course. Once the official transcript is received, the student record will be updated with the completed course(s) and grade(s). This course information will then appear on the student’s record on myTrent and on official transcripts.

Application Process for a Letter of Permission
There are different application procedures depending upon where the student wishes to study. Check the website for details: www.trentu.ca/admin/ro/lop.

Location of Host University

Apply to:

Timeline:

Within Canada

Office of the Registrar

Varies, depending upon session

Outside Canada:
fall or winter session

Trent International Program

February 2

Outside Canada:
summer session

Office of the Registrar

Varies

Application Requirements
• Calendar course descriptions for all courses being requested must accompany the application
• Allow up to 10 working days for processing
• A $50 processing fee must be submitted with the completed application form
• Incomplete applications will be returned to the student unprocessed
For more detailed information about study at foreign universities, see International Educational Opportunities (link).

Student Records

Access to Student Record Policy
    By applying for admission to Trent University and by registering in programs or courses at the University, students accept the University’s right to collect pertinent personal and academic information. The information is used to assess their qualifications for admission, establish and update a record of their academic performance, determine their eligibility for awards and scholarships, determine government funding, and allow the University to undertake its obligations under the Trent Act, 1963. For further information on the collection and use of this information, or if you have concerns about the collection and use of this information, please contact the University Registrar at registrar@trentu.ca.
        All documentation provided to the University to support an application for admission, housing, financial awards, or any petition or appeal becomes the property of the University.
        The University Registrar, in the Office of the Registrar, is the custodian of all official physical and electronic academic records of all students who have been or are currently registered in degree programs at Trent University. The Office of the Registrar strives to ensure the security and privacy of personal information through the application of appropriate systems for access to that information, the development of procedures, and the education and training of staff and faculty to treat personal information in confidence.

Trent Universitys Principles on Access to Confidential Student Records and Disclosure of Information:
The University will not disclose personal information it has collected except in the following circumstances:
1.  the person has consented in writing to disclosure of specific information for a particular purpose
2.  the person has authorized in writing another individual to act on their behalf or participate in their affairs at the University
3.  the information is required by an authorized staff person in the course of their work
4.  to comply with legal requirements, including but not limited to, granting of access to Statistics Canada
5.  in compelling or compassionate circumstances, or as otherwise permitted under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.
    The University will disclose information about students who have graduated, such as degree conferred, date, medals and scholarships, as this information is printed in the Convocation program. Whether a student is currently registered is not considered to be public information and may not be disclosed except as specified in the above Principles.

I. Disclosure to the student
1.  Students normally have the right to review the information contained in their hard copy file, with the exception of confidential evaluations and letters of reference provided by a third party. Students who wish to review their hard copy file must make an appointment with the University Registrar (or designate). Any student who is not satisfied with the access provided may make a formal request under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act through the office of the access/privacy coordinator.
2.  Students may request that incorrect information in their files be corrected and that those who may have received incorrect information are notified of the change. Students seeking to correct their information may be asked to complete a formal access/correction request.
3.  Students have access to their electronic record through myAcademic Record. This includes biographic and academic information.
4.  Documents submitted by or for the student in support of the application for admission or for transfer credit become the property of Trent University and will not be released or redirected. In rare instances authorized by the University Registrar or designate, an original transcript may be released to the student and a copy retained in the file, with an explanation for this action.
5.  Students with no outstanding financial obligations to the University may, upon written request and payment of a fee, obtain an official transcript of their academic record at the University or have copies sent to a third party. Transcripts will show the scholarship, awards and prizes granted, courses taken, grades achieved, academic status, and degrees conferred.
6.  Students with outstanding financial obligations to the University will be denied access to information such as grades, official transcripts and degree certificates, and will be unable to add or drop courses.
II. Disclosure to faculty and administrative officers of the University
    Faculty and administrative staff of the University who require access to student records in order to carry out their official duties are given access on a ‘need to know’ basis.

III. Disclosure to parents, guardians, educational institutions and agencies
1.  Requests for student record information received from another institution of learning, or from other organizations, will be permitted only with written authorization from the student; such authorization specifies the information to be provided (e.g., Official transcript) and to whom the information is to be sent.
2.  Student record information (including application, admission and/or registration information), will not be released to a third party, such as a parent or guardian, without the student’s written authorization.

IV. Disclosure to government agencies
    Student record information may be provided in the following instances:
1.  in response to a court order, summons, or subpoena directing the University to release information
2.  to provide the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities with enrolment reports
3.  to provide data to Stats Canada for national surveys
4.  to provide data as required by professional licensing and certification bodies
5.  to provide information as allowed under access/privacy legislation.

V. Disclosure to Student Governments
    All registered students pay student association fees. The Trent Central Student Association, the College Cabinets, the Julian Blackburn College Student Association, the Trent/UOIT Student Association and the Graduate Student Association (“The Associations”) do, from time to time, require specific student record information for particular purposes. The Office of Student Affairs is authorized to provide the Associations with labels, lists and/or e-mail addresses for the purposes of communicating with students or determining their eligibility for some services.

Protection of Personal Information
Trent University gathers and maintains information used for the purposes of admissions decisions and/or offers, registration and other fundamental activities related to being a member of the Trent University community and attending a public post-secondary institution in the Province of Ontario. Information provided to the University by students, and any other information placed into the student record, will be protected and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (2006).
    Any personal information provided by registering/registered students is collected under the authority of Section 3 of the Trent University Act, 1963. It will be used by the University to register students in courses and for academic and administrative purposes related to being a student of Trent University. Questions on how student information is collected, used or disclosed, may be made in writing to the University Registrar, Office of the Registrar, Blackburn Hall, Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive, Peterborough, ON K9J 7B8, or email: registrar@trentu.ca.

Notification of Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Students’ personal information is collected, used and disclosed in accordance with the Ontario Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. It is used by the University to create permanent student records, track academic progress, process fees, conduct research into university enrolment, administer programs and services of the University and communicate with students regarding University business.
    The name, sex, date of birth and student number of students in Peterborough are provided on a confidential basis to the Trent Central Student Association (TCSA) Student Health Benefits Office for the purpose of enrolment in the student health plan(s) and the issuing of refunds where applicable. This information is transferred by the TCSA to its insurance broker Morneau Sobeco to establish membership in the student health plan and to benefits carrier Green Shield Canada for the purpose of processing student health claims. Student names and trentu.ca email addresses are provided to the TCSA, Graduate Student Association, Julian Blackburn College Student Association or Student Association of UOIT/Durham College (as the case may be) for the purpose of communications related to the student’s membership in the association. Names and student numbers may be made available to student associations in the form of a voters’ list for student elections.
    The University may enter into an agreement with one or more statistical research firms to conduct surveys on behalf of the University. With the University’s permission, these firms may contact groups of students by email to request their participation in a survey on a voluntary and confidential basis. Students may choose to opt out of any such survey and not be contacted further.
    Information regarding graduation and awards may be made public.

Notification of Use and Disclosure of Personal Information to Statistics Canada
    Statistics Canada is the national statistical agency. As such, Statistics Canada carries out hundreds of surveys each year on a wide range of matters including education.
    It is essential to be able to follow students across time and institutions to understand, for example, the factors affecting enrolment demand at post-secondary institutions. The increased emphasis on accountability for public investment means that Statistics Canada regularly asks all colleges and universities to provide data on students and graduates.
    The Federal Statistics Act provides the legal authority for Statistics Canada to obtain access to personal information held by educational institutions. The information may be used only for statistical purposes, and the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act prevent the information from being released in any way that would identify a student.
    Students who do not wish to have their information used are able to ask Statistics Canada to remove their identification and contact information from the national database.
    Further information on the use of this information can be obtained from Statistics Canada’s website: www.statcan.ca or by writing to the Postsecondary Section, Centre for Education Statistics, 17th Floor, R.H. Coats Building, Tunney’s Pasture, Ottawa, K1A 0T6.

Transcripts
    Copies of official grade transcripts will be issued only at the written request of the student. In accordance with the Access to Student Record Policy, the student’s signature is required for the release of records. Transcripts issued directly to the student are stamped “Issued to Student” and are considered unofficial. Official transcripts are those transcripts sent directly to other institutions or to third parties at the student’s request.

Ordering Transcripts
    Transcripts may be ordered in person at the Office of the Registrar, by mail, or through the Transcript request available on the University website: www.trentu.ca/admin/mytrent/transcriptRequest.html. A fee must be paid for each copy of a transcript.
    Requests must be accompanied by the following information:
1. Full name when registered as a student, and current name (if different)
2. Trent student number (or date of birth) and the degree pursued (e.g., B.A., B. Sc.)
3. Current mailing address and a daytime telephone number
4. Number of transcripts required
5. The complete name and address of where the transcript is to be sent
6. Payment information
7. Signature.

Picking up transcripts
    If someone other than the student is required to pick up the transcript, the student must give that person a signed authorization identifying the person and indicating that they are authorized to pick up the transcript. Photo identification will be required.

Payment
    Transcripts will be issued at the cost of $10 each. The Office of the Registrar accepts cheques (payable to Trent University), Visa and MasterCard. Those wishing to pay cash for transcripts must pay the fee at the Student Accounts Office (Blackburn Hall) and bring the receipt to the Office of the Registrar. When paying by credit card, students must include their name, the type of credit card, the credit card number, the card’s expiry date and their signature.
        Transcripts will not be released for students who have an outstanding financial obligation to the University.

Final Examinations and Mid-year Tests

Scheduling
  With the exception of laboratory examinations in the sciences, no in-class tests or final examinations which are worth more than 10% of the final grade may be held during the last two weeks of classes in the Fall or Winter term. In the Summer session the period during which in-class tests and examinations may not be held is the last two weeks for 12-week courses and the last week for 6-week courses.
    The examination schedule is designed to avoid conflicts and to ensure that no student writes more than twice within a 24-hour period. In the case of take-home examinations or tests, the instructor assigns a submission date that must occur before the end of the examination period. Students who have added courses after the examination schedule has been produced may be expected to write more than twice within a 24-hour period.
    The writing time allotted is the same for all students in a course (with the exception of students with disabilities; see below).
    Students who wish to observe cultural or religious holidays during an examination period must notify the Office of the Registrar in writing by the final Friday in September. If it is possible, scheduling will be adjusted to accommodate these dates. If it is not possible, students must submit a written request to their instructors for alternative arrangements, explaining the reason for the request and including supporting documentation.
    Examinations and tests for students with disabilities who require disability-related supports (e.g., extra time or other assistance) are available. All requests must be made through the Disability Services Office at least two weeks before the examination or test, and must be supported by appropriate documentation from a qualified health care diagnostician. Information regarding documentation guidelines is available at www.trentu.ca/sas.

Student Identification
Students must bring their Trent student cards to all examinations. Cards must be visible to the Examination Invigilator. Students who fail to produce a valid student card must report to the Office of Dean of Arts & Science, with their card, by 1 p.m. on the next working day. Students whose names are not printed on an attendance list are not registered in the course. They must report to the Office of the Registrar by 1 p.m. on the next working day to clarify their status. Failure to do so will result in a grade of zero for the course.

Missed Examinations
Students who miss an examination for reasons beyond their control should consult with their instructor immediately about the possibility of alternate arrangements. If such arrangements are not possible, students may petition for aegrotat standing. (See below for the requirements for aegrotat standing.)

Unsatisfactory Examination Results
There are no supplemental examinations. The only options available to students who are dissatisfied with the result of an examination are to appeal the final grade in the course (see Appeals of Final Grades below) or to repeat the course. (See Course Repeats above.)

Student Access to Graded Examination Papers
Graded examination papers are the property of the University and are not intended to be available to students. They may be seen by students only if a formal appeal of a final grade has been unsuccessful (see Academic Appeals below). Requests to see an examination paper must be made in writing to the Office of the Registrar. There is a fee for each request.

Mid-year Review
    Mid-year marks are available through myAcademic Record in January to help students assess their academic performance; they do not represent official grades, and mid-year grades do not appear on any formal document.

Official Final Grades
        Final grades are official thirty days after they have been released by the Office of the Registrar. If errors in the calculation or recording of grades come to light after the grades have been released, all affected grades may be recalculated and raised or lowered with the approval of the Dean. However, this process must be completed, and corrected transcripts must be issued, before the thirty day period has passed. Instructors and/or departments are not permitted to release final grades. Final examination marks can be released to students only after final grades have been released by the Office of the Registrar.

Academic Distinctions

Medals
   The Governor General, President Symons and Bagnani Medals are awarded each year at the spring Convocation ceremony. No application is necessary; students are automatically considered under the criteria listed below. Winners of these medals will have this distinction noted on their official transcript.

   Governor-Generals Medals
The gold medal is awarded to the graduate student with the highest standing on graduation and the silver medal is awarded to the student with the highest standing on graduation with an Honours degree.

   President Symons Medals
Established in 1972 in honour of T.H.B. Symons, the founding president of Trent University. Awarded to students in the Honours program who achieve high overall standing on graduation.

   Professor Gilbert Bagnani Medals
Established in 1986 to honour the late Professor Gilbert Bagnani, one of the founding faculty members of Trent University. Awarded to graduating students in the General program who achieve high overall standing.

Deans Honour Roll
    All students (except B.Ed. candidates) who achieve an average of 80% or better in their most recent session and have an overall cumulative average of 75% or better, will have their names placed on the Dean’s Honour Roll. This academic distinction will appear on the official transcript. The names of graduating students who are eligible for the Dean’s Honour Roll will be noted in the convocation program.

Presidents Honour Roll
    All graduating students (except B.Ed.) who achieve an overall cumulative average of 80% or better will have their names placed on the President’s Honour Roll. This academic distinction will appear on the official transcript. The names of graduating students who are eligible for the President’s Honour Roll will be noted in the convocation program.

Graduation and Convocation
    For students to graduate, Senate must confirm that they have successfully completed the academic requirements for their degree. Once students have graduated and are free of all financial obligations to the University, they are eligible to receive official transcripts, noting the successful completion of their degree, and to receive their degree or diploma.
    In the year in which they intend to graduate, students must submit an Application to Graduate form to the Office of the Registrar (see www.trentu.ca/mytrent and click on ‘Quick Forms’). The Office of the Registrar will assess whether the students are enrolled in the courses required to complete the academic requirements for their degree, and will inform the students by letter of the result of this assessment. A fee is charged for late applications. See the University Diary for deadlines.
    Once grades have been processed, the names of all students who have successfully completed the academic requirements for their degree are submitted to Senate for approval.
    Students who have successfully completed the academic requirements for their degree, but who are not free of financial obligations to the University, may participate in the spring Convocation ceremony but will not receive their degree or diploma until their financial obligations are met.
    Students who have successfully completed the academic requirements for their degree too late for the spring Convocation ceremony will have their names submitted to the next appropriate meeting of Senate, and receive their degree or diploma provided they are free of all financial obligations to the University. Students may participate at the next Spring convocation ceremony.

Difficulties with the Completion of Course Work
    There are three options available to students who have difficulties with the completion of their course work for reasons beyond their control: (1) if they cannot complete their course work before the end of the academic session, they may request incomplete standing; (2) if they cannot write the final examination in a course, they may request aegrotat standing; (3) if they wish to withdraw from the course altogether, but have missed the deadline for withdrawal without academic penalty, they may petition for late withdrawal. These three options are described in detail below.

1. Incomplete Standing
Incomplete standing permits students to prearrange with their instructor to submit any remaining work in a course by a specified date after the end of the academic session. Failure by students to organize their workload is not considered adequate grounds for incomplete standing. A petition for incomplete standing must be made to the instructor, and approved by the chair, before the department or program deadline (if there is one), but in any case before submission of final grades to the Office of the Registrar.
    The instructor specifies the deadline for submission of outstanding work and the grade which will be assigned if the deadline is not met. The latest possible deadlines for the submission of outstanding work are:
            •   September 30, 2009 for courses completed in the 2009 Summer session.
            •   February 26, 2010 for courses completed in the 2009 Fall session
            •   June 28, 2010 for courses completed in the 2010 Winter session

2. Aegrotat Standing
Students may, if eligible, be exempted from writing the final examination in a course. A petition for aegrotat standing must be made to the instructor as soon as the relevant circumstances are known and normally before the scheduled examination time. An aegrotat standing is granted only if all required term work has been completed and the student has a passing average. Students are advised to familiarize themselves with the policies and procedures for calculating aegrotat standing in the department(s) or program(s) involved.

3. Late Withdrawal
Late withdrawal is granted to students who have missed the deadline for withdrawal from courses without academic penalty but, for reasons judged to be compelling, have been unable to complete their course work. A petition for late withdrawal is made to the Committee on Undergraduate Petitions through the Senior Tutor as soon as possible and normally before the end of the academic session.

Academic Status

Assessment Average
A student’s academic status is determined by a session average or by a cumulative average (see below).
•   The cumulative average includes all courses for which a grade has been assigned and all attempted courses for all programs/degrees excluding repeated courses with a lower grade. (Transfer credits are given a pass grade and thus are not included in the average.)
•   The session average includes all courses in the current session (Fall-Winter or Summer) for which a grade has been assigned.
    The initial assessment average is calculated at the end of the academic session in which students have completed the third credit in their program. It includes all courses for which a grade has been assigned since beginning the program. Thereafter, the cumulative and session averages are calculated at the end of each academic session.

Categories of Academic Status
    There are five categories of academic status: (1) good standing, (2) probation, (3) conditional probation, (4) academic suspension and (5) suspension – academic dishonesty. Regulations governing the categories differ, depending on whether the assessment averages are based on a full-time load (more than three credits) or a part-time load (three credits or fewer).

    1. Good Standing
Students are in good standing if their session average is at least 60%.                

    2. Probation
Students are initially placed on probation if their session average is 50 – 59.9% or if they are returning from academic suspension. If their session average is 60% or higher upon the next assessment, probation is lifted. If their session average is below 60% upon the next assessment, student will be suspended.

    3. Conditional Probation
Students who are accepted into the Fresh Start Program will have an academic status of -Conditional Probation for the session that they are in the program.

    4. Academic Suspension
Students are suspended from the University for a year if their session average is less than 50% or if they are on probation and it is less than 60%.
        Part-time load: Students are suspended from the University if their initial assessment average (calculated at the end of the academic session in which students have completed the third credit in their program) is less than 50%, if their session average is less than 50%, or if they are on probation and their session average is less than 60%.

    5. Suspension Academic Dishonesty
Students may be placed on suspension by the Associate Dean (Undergraduate Studies) for repeated violations of the Academic Integrity Policy. The first time penalties of “Suspension – Academic Dishonesty” are imposed, their duration will be for periods of up to one year. Subsequent penalties will be for periods of up to three years. Appeals of the Associate Dean’s decision should be made to the Special Appeals Committee. Students seeking support with an appeal should consult their Senior Tutor or seek advice from faculty members.
        Note: Students who are on suspension will not be awarded any transfer credits (regardless of the post-secondary institution attended) for the time period that they were on academic suspension from Trent University.

Continuing Post-Secondary Studies During Academic or Non-Academic Suspension
Students will normally not be permitted to complete studies at another Canadian university during the term of their suspension. Studies completed at another post-secondary institution during the term of suspension may be considered as a basis for re-admission to the university, but will not be eligible for transfer credit consideration.

Procedures for Students on Probation or under Academic Suspension
Students who are placed on academic suspension may, through the Senior Tutor of their College, petition the Committee on Undergraduate Petitions to have their status reconsidered. If the petition is successful and they are accepted into the Fresh Start Program, they will have their academic standing changed to Conditional Probation. Fresh Start students will be permitted to continue their studies at a reduced course load under the supervision of their Senior Tutor for the Fall/Winter session immediately following placement on Academic Suspension. Students may enroll in the Fresh Start Program one time only. In some cases, the student may be allowed to return on Probation.

Academic Petitions and Appeals
Students may appeal grades which they have received, regulations which have caused them undue hardship, the penalty of academic suspension, and penalties for academic dishonesty. As a last resort, students may appeal the results of previous petitions or appeals through a special appeal.

Appeals of Grades on Term Work
Appeals of grades on term assignments and tests are made to the course instructor and subsequently, if necessary, to the chair of the department or program. Students are advised to familiarize themselves with the appeals policy of the department or program involved.

Appeals of Final Grades
Appeals of final grades are made in writing to the Office of the Registrar. There is a fee of $25 for each appeal which is refunded if the grade is raised. The grade of a student who is making an appeal cannot be lowered as a result of that appeal.
    Only the following work may be reassessed in appeals of final grades:
        •   term-work not returned to students before the submission of final grades to the Office of the Registrar
        •   final examinations
        The deadlines for appeals of final grades are:
        •   September 18, 2009 for courses completed in the 2009 Summer session
        •   March 8, 2010 for courses completed in the 2009 Fall session
        •   July 5, 2010 for courses completed in the 2010 Winter session
    Students are informed of the results of appeals of final grades as soon as possible after the appeal deadline, but, in any case, before the beginning of the next academic session after the appeal deadline.

Appeals of Academic Regulations
Students who believe that specific academic regulations have imposed undue hardship on them may petition the application of the regulations to the Committee on Undergraduate Petitions through their Senior Tutor.

Special Appeals
If all other levels of appeals or petitions have been exhausted and have been unsuccessful, students may make an appeal to the Special Appeals Committee through the secretary of the committee. Such appeals must be made within four weeks of receipt of the previous ruling, and must be in writing on the appropriate forms available from the University Secretariat in Bata Library. All decisions of the Special Appeals Committee are final and take effect when issued.

Summary Table     
    The table below summarizes the procedures for petitions and appeals, indicating the appropriate situation for each (“why”), the persons responsible for dealing with them (“who”) and the deadlines for submission (“when”). It is intended only as a convenient summary. Before pursuing any of these options, students should consult the appropriate section of the calendar where the official procedures and requirements are laid out in full.
    Although the procedures outlined below have been designed to be as thorough as possible, there may be situations which are not adequately covered by any of them. In such cases students are strongly advised to consult their Instructor, the chair of their department or program, their Senior Tutor, or the Dean of Arts and Science.

Why

Who

When

Petitions Concerning Incomplete Work

Incomplete Standing

You will be unable to complete your course work by the end of term.

Course Instructor (with the approval of the chair)

Before department or program deadline (if there is one) but in any case before submission of final grades.

Aegrotat Standing

You will be unable to write the final examination.

Course Instructor

Normally before final examination.

Late Withdrawal

You were unable to withdraw from a course before the published deadline to withdraw without academic penalty.

Committee on Undergraduate Petitions (through Senior Tutor)

After the published date for withdrawal without academic penalty but normally before the end of the academic session

Appeals of Grades and Regulations

Term Work

You wish to appeal a grade in a term assignment or test.

1.  Course Instructor
2.  Chair (if necessary)

Before department or program deadline (if there is one) but in any case before submission of final grades.

Final Grades

You wish to appeal a grade in a final examination or in term work which was not returned to you before the submission of final grades.

Office of the Registrar

See below.

Academic Regulations

You wish to appeal an academic regulation.

Committee on Under-graduate Petitions (through Senior Tutor)

Consult Senior Tutor.

Appeals of Academic Suspension

You have been suspended as a result of your academic standing.

Committee on Under-graduate Petitions (through Senior Tutor)

By July 9 for the previous Fall/Winter session, or within two weeks of receiving notice.

Appeals of Penalties for Academic Dishonesty

You wish to have a penalty for academic misconduct withdrawn (ranging from a reprimand to expulsion from the University).

Assoc. Dean (appeal of Chair’s ruling or Registrar’s ruling)

Within 2 weeks of imposition of penalty

Within 4 weeks of imposition of penalty

Special Appeals

You wish to appeal the result of any previous appeals or
petitions.

Special Appeals Committee

Within 4 weeks of receipt of previous ruling.

Academic Integrity
The Academic Integrity website can be found at www.trentu.ca/vpacademic/integrity.php.

Undergraduate Academic Integrity Policy

Part I: Application and Definitions

1.1 Application
This policy applies to students registered in undergraduate courses in the Faculty of Arts and Science at Trent University as well as to applicants to undergraduate programs at the University.

1.2 Terminology
In this policy, “department” means undergraduate departments, programs, and schools. “Chair” means chairs and directors of undergraduate departments, programs, and schools. “Associate Dean” means the Associate Dean of Arts and Science (Undergraduate Studies) and “Registrar” means University Registrar.

1.3 Academic Integrity
All members of the University community share the responsibility for the academic standards and reputation of the University. When students submit work for academic evaluation and credit, they imply that they are the sole authors of the work. Clear and careful attribution of the words and ideas of others is an essential part of academic scholarship. Academic honesty is a cornerstone of the development and acquisition of knowledge and is a condition of continued membership in the University community.

1.4 Academic Dishonesty
Academic dishonesty, including plagiarism and cheating, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. Engaging in any form of academic dishonesty or misconduct in order to obtain academic credit or advantage of any kind is an offence under this policy.

1.5 Plagiarism
Plagiarism is knowingly presenting words, ideas, images, data, or any other form of work of another person (including essays, theses, lab reports, projects, assignments, presentations and posters) in a way that represents or could be reasonably seen to represent the work as one’s own. “Knowingly” includes ought reasonably to have known. Plagiarism includes failure to acknowledge sources correctly and submitting materials copied from the internet without proper acknowledgement of the source. Draft work submitted for evaluation is subject to the same standard as final work.

Cheating
Cheating is dishonest academic conduct or attempted dishonest academic conduct during tests or examinations or in the preparation of any other course work or in the presentation of credentials for admission to the University or one of its programs. Some common examples are:

  • submitting one’s own original student work for credit in two or more different courses without the prior agreement of the instructors involved
  • bringing aids, including electronic aids, that have not been authorized by the instructor into an examination or test
  • impersonating another individual or colluding in an impersonation for an examination or test
  • copying from one or more other individuals or knowingly permitting one or more other individuals to copy from one’s test, examination paper, lab report, or assignment
  • collaborating with one or more other individuals when collaborative work has not been expressly authorized by the instructor communicating with one or more other students during a test or examinatio
  • purchasing or selling any piece of work for submission, or facilitating the selling and purchasing of such material
  • submitting purchased material as one’s own work
  • falsifying or tampering with results in laboratory experiments or research assignments
  • falsifying transcripts or tampering with documents used to make decisions about admissions to the University or one of its programs
  • withholding transcripts or other required documents at the time of application to the University; submitting false or misrepresentative medical certificates or other documentation in support of requests for concessions on academic work or deadlines

Student to Consult if in Doubt

Students who have any doubt as to what might be considered academic dishonesty in a particular course should consult the instructor of the course to obtain appropriate guidelines.

Part II: Penalties for Academic Offences on Course Work Tests or Exams

Minor or major offence
The penalty for a student who has been found to have committed an academic offence will be based on whether the offence is minor or major.

Penalties

  • First minor offence: The penalty for a first offence that is a minor offence will be a grade of 0 on the piece of work with no opportunity to re-write.
  • Second minor or first major offence: The penalty for a second minor offence (i.e., two minors) or a first offence that is a major offence will be a grade of 0 on the piece of work with no opportunity to re-write, plus the deduction of marks in the course potentially down to a course grade of 0, plus a transcript notation (e.g., 62-Academic Dishonesty; 0-Academic Dishonesty).
  • Subsequent offence, Suspension: The penalty for any offence i) after two minor offences; or ii) after a first offence that is a major offence; or iii) that is a major offence where a minor offence is already on record will be a period of suspension from the University (academic status “Suspension – Academic Dishonesty”) ranging from one term to two years in addition to a 0-Academic Dishonesty in the course.
  • Subsequent offence, Expulsion: The penalty for any subsequent offence will be expulsion from the University.

2.3 Extraordinary circumstances
The penalties above will be levied unless there are extraordinary circumstances which justify a different penalty.

2.4 Factors to determine whether offence minor or major
In deciding whether an offence is minor or major, consideration will be given to the following factors:

  • the extent of the dishonesty
  • whether the act in question was deliberate or whether the student ought reasonably to have known
  • the importance of the work in question as a component of the course or program
  • the academic experience of the student
  • any other relevant circumstances    

These factors shall also be taken into consideration in determining penalty where the usual penalty provides for a range.

2.5 Ineligibility for Honour Rolls
A student who has committed a major offence or multiple offences is ineligible for the Dean’s Honour Roll that academic year and the President’s Honour Roll at graduation.

Part III: Procedures for Evaluation of Course Work and Conduct During Tests and Exams

3.1 Instructor investigates
If an instructor has reason to believe that a student has committed an academic offence, the instructor will so inform the student within a reasonable time and invite the student to meet to discuss the matter. The instructor will make reasonable inquiries to investigate the circumstances of the matter.

3.2 Instructor finds no academic dishonesty
If after meeting with the student and reviewing the evidence the instructor is satisfied that no academic dishonesty occurred, no further action will be taken by the instructor unless new evidence comes to his/her attention.

3.3 Instructor finds academic dishonesty, reports to Chair
If, after meeting with the student (or if the student fails to respond to the request for a meeting or does not attend a prearranged meeting) the instructor decides that academic dishonesty has occurred, the instructor will prepare a report to the Chair. The report will summarize the relevant facts and evidence, including the student’s version of events if given. The report will additionally state whether the instructor considers the offence to be minor or major and the reasons therefore, as well as any extraordinary circumstances that are evident in the case. Copies of all supporting documentation will be attached to the report. The instructor will inform the student in writing that a report to the Chair has been prepared and that a copy has been made available for the student to pick up from the department office.

3.4 Opportunity for comment by student
Should the student wish to add to or clarify the information in the report, the student may send written comments to the Chair within seven days of the date of the report.

3.5 Chair finds no academic dishonesty
The Chair will carefully review the report and comments, if any. If the Chair is not satisfied that academic dishonesty occurred, the Chair will inform the student in writing of his/her decision and no further action will be taken unless new evidence is brought to the Chair’s attention.

3.6 Chair finds academic dishonesty, consults Office of the Associate Dean
If the Chair is satisfied that academic dishonesty occurred, the Chair will inquire of the Office of the Associate Dean whether there is a record of any previous academic offence by the student.

3.7 First offence, Chair decides
If there is no record on file of any previous academic offence by the student the Chair will decide the matter. The Chair will determine whether the offence is minor or major and levy a penalty accordingly. If, based on extraordinary circumstances, the Chair decides to levy a penalty other than the usual penalty, the Associate Dean will be notified of the reasons for the decision on penalty. The Chair will send to the student an Academic Dishonesty Form to inform the student in writing of the decision and confirm that a record of the offence will be filed in the department office and the Office of the Associate Dean.

3.8 Limits of Chair’s authority
The Chair does not have authority to levy a penalty exceeding a grade in the course of 0 with the transcript notation “0 – Academic Dishonesty.”

3.9 Appeal of Chair’s decision to the Associate Dean
The student may appeal a decision by the Chair by writing to the Associate Dean setting out the grounds for appeal within two weeks of receiving the Academic Dishonesty Form. The Associate Dean will normally respond to the appeal within two weeks of receiving the appeal.

3.10 Prior record or stronger penalty deemed appropriate by Chair, Associate Dean decides
If there is already a record of an academic offence(s) on file for a student the Chair will forward the material to the Associate Dean who will decide the matter. The Chair may also forward a case to the Associate Dean for decision on an alleged first major offence where the Chair deems that a penalty stronger than he/she can render is appropriate. In the latter case the Chair will set out the reasons for his/her conclusion that a stronger penalty is appropriate.

3.11 Note on Tests and Exams
Where an allegation of academic dishonesty arises during a test or examination, the responsible invigilator will collect the available evidence and, if he/she is not the course instructor, will notify the course instructor who will proceed as detailed above.

Part IV: Procedures for Applications to the University of one of its Programs

4.1 Notice to Registrar
Where the alleged academic dishonesty involves falsifying, misrepresenting, or withholding records for entry into the University or one of its programs, the Registrar will be informed.

4.2 Student notified
The Registrar will notify the student in writing of the allegation and will invite the student to meet within a reasonable time. If the student does not respond to the request for a meeting or does not attend a prearranged meeting, the Registrar will proceed to make a decision on the basis of the evidence before him/her.

4.3 Registrar decides
If, after reviewing the evidence, the Registrar is satisfied that no academic dishonesty occurred, the Registrar will inform the student in writing of his/her decision and no further action will be taken by the Registrar unless new evidence is brought to the Registrar’s attention.
If the Registrar is satisfied that academic dishonesty has occurred, the Registrar will decide the appropriate penalty and inform the student in writing of his/her decision. A written record of the incident, along with the documented evidence, will be kept on file at the Office of the Registrar and the Office of the Associate Dean if appropriate.

4.4 Appeal of Registrar’s decision to Associate Dean
The student may appeal the decision of the Registrar by writing to the Associate Dean setting out the grounds for appeal within two weeks of notification of the Registrar’s decision. The Associate Dean will normally respond to the appeal within two weeks of receiving the appeal.

Part V: Other

5.1 Final Appeal
The student may appeal a decision of the Associate Dean to the Special Appeals Committee of the University within four weeks of notification of the decision. The decision of the Special Appeals Committee is final within the University.

5.2 Assistance with appeals procedure
Students seeking support for an appeal may consult with their Senior Tutor. For guidance on the appeals procedures at the University see the “Petitions and Appeals” section of the calendar and the Special Appeals website.

5.3 Privacy protection
In accordance with privacy legislation, personal information gathered under this policy will only be shared among university personnel on a need to know basis.

5.4 Other allegations of academic dishonesty
Any other allegations of academic dishonesty may be made in writing to the Associate Dean. The Associate Dean will determine the appropriate procedure to be followed.

5.5 No permanent record of dropped allegations
If it is determined that allegations are not supported by sufficient evidence, no permanent record of the incident will be kept on file at the offices of the department, Registrar, or Associate Dean.

5.6 Withdrawal is not a stay of proceedings
A student’s withdrawal from a course, program, or the University does not stay or prevent proceedings for academic dishonesty under this policy. Further, penalties for academic dishonesty determined under this policy will appear as appropriate on the student’s record, including the student’s transcript, despite any such withdrawal.

5.7 Removal of transcript notations
If a student has a notation of academic dishonesty on his or her transcript, an application can be made in writing to the Vice President (Academic) to have the notation removed from the transcript. Such applications may not be initiated before two years have passed. “0” grades and notations of suspension cannot be removed.

5.8 Report on Academic Offences
A summary of academic offences (setting out the nature of each offence and the penalty) will be prepared by the Associate Dean annually, published on an Academic Integrity website, and circulated to Senate each year for information.