Trail Standards

 


 

Examples of environmental standards


[Hiking] [Biking][Equestrian][Snowmobile][Cross Country Skiing][Specific Examples][References]

 


 

Hiking
 

 

Reference

Tread Width (m)

Cleared Width (m)

Grade

Height (m)

Parks Canada

0.45 - 0.5

to the degree necessary

for safe and unimpaired movement

desirable 1-10%

max. 20%

2.5

MTRCA

0.5

minimum 1m

desirable 1-10%

max. 20%

min. 2.5

Bruce Trail Association

0.6

1.5

15-20%

2.5

Flink et al.

3.0

--

no restrictions

2.4

Ntnl. Rec. and Park Ass.

0.6

1.2

max. 10%

2.1

 

Biking
 

 

Reference

Tread Width (m)

Cleared Width (m)

Grade

Height (m)

Parks Canada

desirable 2.5

min. 1.2

2.5

desirable 0-3%

max. 10%

2.5

MTRCA rural/low use

3.0

min. 4

desirable 0-5%

max. 10%

min. 3.0

MTRCA urban/high use

3.0

min. 7

desirable 0-3%

max. 6%

min. 3.0

Flink et al.

rural 1.2

urban 1.5

--

desirable 3%

max. 8%

3.0

Ntnl. Rec. and Park Ass.

desirable 2.4

min. 1.5

--

max. 8%

2.1

 

Equestrian
 

 

Reference

Tread Width (m)

Cleared Width (m)

Grade

Height (m)

Parks Canada

0.45-1m

(wider to allow

passing)

2.5

desirable 0-10%

max. 20%

3

MTRCA

2.5

min. 2.5

desirable 0-10%

max. 15%

min. 3.5

Flink et al.

1.2

2.4

desirable 5%

max. 10%

3.7

Ntn. Rec. and Parks Ass.

0.6

1.2

max. 10%

2.1

 

Snowmobile
 

 

Reference

Tread Width (m)

Cleared Width (m)

Grade

Height (m)

BC Parks

5

--

max. sustained 25%

2.5

(above max.

snow depth)

Bombardier

--

min 3.0

less than 50%

2.4

Fink et al.

one way 2.4

two way 3.0

--

desirable 10%

maximum 25%

3.0

 

Cross Country Skiing
 

 

Reference

Tread Width (m)

Cleared Width (m)

Grade

Height (m)

Parks Canada

--

one way 1.5 - 2.5

two way min. 4

general use max. 10%

expert use max. 40%

2.5

(above max. 

snow depth)

MTRCA

2.5

min. 2.5

desirable 0-10%

max. 15%

min. 3.5

Fink et al.

2.4 - 3.0 (two-way)

--

desirable 3%

max. 10%

--

 

Specific Examples

Draft Trail Standards for the Central Ontario Loop Trail

(J. Marsh, 1999)

 

Every section of trail comprising The Loop should have the following:

1. Signs at each road crossing or major access point indicating:
    - Name and logo of Loop trail
    - Name of the trailhead or access point, eg. Highway 7 or Station Road
    - Name of, and distance in kms to next access point, e.g. Bannockburn, 6.5 kms.
    - Activities permitted on the trail (preferably standardised symbols, otherwise words)
    - Activities not permitted on the trail (preferably symbol with line through it, otherwise words, e.g. no hunting, no ATVs.
    - Speed limits
    - Hazards e.g. trail not groomed, steep hill up/down - 15 degrees,
    - Name of agency/group managing the trail, and how to contact them, eg. tel.no.

2. Barriers, e.g. posts, gates, boulders,  at every trailhead to prevent/deter activities notpermitted on that section of trail.

3. At major trail access points:
    - sign on highway indicating trail
    - off road parking
    -  garbage cans that are emptied regularly
    - sign indicating where to go, (eg nearest hospital),  who to contact in emergency, eg. tel. no. 911
    - sign with map of complete trail, indicating adjacent attractions, convenience stores, cafes, accomodation, eg B & Bs.

4.Adequate maintenance to enable safe and enjoyable use for activities permitted.
    In particular the trail should be:
    - kept surfaced with materials suited to permitted activities,eg.limestone screenings
    - kept smooth enough for the  permitted activities
    - drained  sufficiently to prevent erosion of the trail orpersistence of puddles and mud
    - kept clear (along both sides, and above) of obstructions, such asfallen trees, rocks.
    - closed, and posted closed, if dangerous, e.g. if bridge unsafe.
    - signed, as indicated above, and any missing or vandalised signsshould be replaced as soon as possible.

5. Regular inspections, at least once per month, involving the completion of a trail condition and use form (see example on Trail Studies Unit website)
    for submission to those responsible for maintaining the trail.

6. Regular education about, and enforcement ( by police or volunteers authorised to undertake selected enforcement) of regulations pertaining to the trail, e.g. permitted uses, speed limits, no littering.

7. Regular contact (eg annual meeting, or letter) with owners of land adjacent to the trail to identify any problems arising from use of the traul, and solve them quickly.

 

The Sendero De Chile
Outline of Basic standards

         Generally, the path will be regulated by technical design standards along its entire length, which will include a degree of flexibility according to the biogeographic zone in which the path is located, given the diversity of the climatic, topographic, edaphic and geomorphologic features present along the length of the country.
In this respect, and considering the know-how generated by similar projects carried out in the U.S.A. and Canada, the following basic design standards have been established a priori:
 

 

Trail width 

1,50 mts

Strip Width 

4,20 mts

Pruning heights

3,00 mts 

Maximum slope

10 % 

Resting areas every

12 kms 

Refuge areas every

30 kms 

Camping zones every

30 kms 

Water barriers against erosion (tilt)

45 - 60 degrees 

 

References

B.C. Parks. (1993) Park Facility Standards.

Bombardier Ltd. (1972) A Guide to the Development and Maintenance of Good Snowmobile Trails. Bombardier Ltd. Valcourt, Quebec.

Fogg, G.E. (1975) Park Planning Guidelines. National Society for Park Resources, National Recreation and Park Association. United States.

Flink, C. et al. (1993) Trails for the Twenty-first Century: Planning Design and Management Manual for Multi-Use Trails, ed. K.L. Ryan. Island Press: United States.

Metropolitan Toronto Region Conservation Authority. (1992) Trail Planning and Layout. Toronto.

Parks Canada. (1978) Trail Manual. Indian and Northern Affairs, Ottawa.

 


 

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Last updated by Wesley Found on September 28, 2011.