Trail User Codes Continued


 

Trail Ethics can vary depending on specific trails, organizations or activities, therefore this section is dedicated to communicating the different codes of ethics concerning trail use. Please combine what you will learn in this section with common sense and respect for the environment, and other trail users.

This page lists some Trail User Codes of Conduct that are used by groups outside of Ontario, Canada. Click HERE to go back to Ontario-based Codes.

Codes of Ethics Advocated by Groups Outside of Ontario

  Alberta Bicycle Association

 

  Aspen Parks and Recreation

 

  Bear River Outdoor Recreation Alliance

 

  Blueribbon Coalition

 

  Boulder Area Trails Coalition

  The Camel Trail Partnership

  Canada Trails – Skiing

 

  Canada Trails - Hiking

 

  Canada Trails – Mountain Biking

 

  Canadian All-Terrain Vehicle Distributors Council

 

  City of Albuquerque

 

  City of Duluth Parks and Recreation

 

  The City of Edmonton

 

  City of Fayetteville

 

  City of Minnetonka

 

  City of Phoenix

 

  City of Renton

 

  City of San Luis Obispo Parks and Recreation Department

 

  City of Saskatoon and the Nordic Ski Club of Saskatoon

 

  City of Seattle

 

  City of Shelton Trails

  City of St. George

  City of St. Albert

 

  Colorado State Parks

 

  Connecticut Horse Council

 

  The Countryside Agency (UK)

 

  Deer Valley Resort

 

  Devon County Council – Horseback Riders

 

  Devon County Council – Multi-use Trails

  Du Page County

  East Coast Trail Association

  Essex County Trail Association

  The Forestry Commission (Great Britain)

  Forestry SA

 

  Forillon National Park of Canada

 

  Friends of the Delaware Canal

 

  Gap Creek Trail Alliance

 

  Glasgow City Council

 

  Greene County Greene Ways

 

  Greenwood Village, Colorado

 

  Heartland Trail Riders

 

  Heritage Rail Trail

 

  Ice Age Park and Trail (US National Park Service)

 

  Idaho ATV Association Inc.

 

  Illinois Department of Natural Resources

 

  International Mountain Biking Association

  Indy Parks and Recreation

  International Bicycle Fund

 

  Island Rock Crawlers Four-Wheel Drive Society

 

  Jefferson County Open Spaces

  Kansas Trails Council

  Kickapoo Valley Reserve

  Leave No Trace

 

  Little Miami Scenic Trail

  Manitoba Recreational Trails Association Inc.

  Maynard Trails (Maynard, Massachusetts)

 

  Mesabi Trail

 

  Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District

 

  Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

 

  Missouri Conservationist

 

  The Mountain Bay Trail

 

  Musketawa Trail

 

  New Hampshire Trails Bureau

 

  New River Gorge National Park

 

  New Zealand Department of Conservation

 

  North Dakota Parks and Recreation Department

 

  North Idaho Centennial Trail

 

  Nova Scotia Trails

 

  Oklahoma City Trails

 

  Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation

 

  Old Plank Road Trail

  Old Quarry Nature Center

  Oregon State University College Forests

 

  Oregon-California Trails Association (Idaho Chapter)

 

  Otago Central Rail Trail

 

  Parks and Wildlife Service Tasmania

 

  Parks and Wildlife Service, Forestry Tasmania, Tourism Tasmania, Sport and Recreation Tasmania, Tasmanian Recreational Vehicle Association

 

  Path Trails: Metro Atlanta’s Greenway Trail System

  Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

  Pittsburg Trail Advocacy Group

  Poudre River Trail Corridor

  Prince Albert National Park of Canada

 

  Railstrails Australia

 

  Riding Mountain National Park

 

  Royal National Park

 

  Rubicon Trail

 

  San Mateo County Horesemen's Association

 

  Santa Cruz Circle Trail

 

  South Australian Trails

 

  South Carolina State Trails Program

 

  Southern Arizona Hiking Club

 

  Spokane Centennial Trail

 

  Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve

 

  Trail Riders Fellowship

  Trails and Open Space Coalition (Pikes Peak Colorado)

  Trails BC

 

  The Trans Pennine Trail

 

  Tread Lightly! Inc. - Responsible Cross-Country / Back Country Skiing

 

  Tread Lightly! Inc. – Responsible Hiking

  Tread Lightly! Inc. – Responsible Horseback Riding

 

  Tread Lightly! Inc. – Responsible Mountain Bike Riding

 

  Tread Lightly! Inc. – Responsible Off-Highway Motorcycle Use

 

  Tread Lightly! Inc. – Responsible ATV Riding

 

  Tread Lightly! Inc. – Responsible Snowmobiling

 

  United States Trail Ride Inc.

 

  Various

 

  The Virginia Creeper Trail Club

 Wake County Parks and Open Spaces

  Wallace Township

 

  Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission

 

  Washington Trails Association

 

  Waterton Lakes National Park 

  The West Coast Trail

  Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources – ATV Operator’s Code of Ethics

 

  Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources – Wisconsin Trail Etiquette & Safety Guidelines: Tips for Trail Users

 

  Wisconsin State Trails Council

 

  Wyoming State Parks and Cultural Resources

 


 

Alberta Bicycle Association

 

Tips For Group Riding

 

  • Stay Alert
    • Momentary inattention is the number one cause of accidents. Be aware of what is in front and behind you, watch your line, and keep your hands near your brakes
  • Make Your Own Decisions
    • Stop at all stop signs and lights on your own. What’s clear for someone else might not be clear for you.
  • Ride in a Predictable Manner:
    • It’s especially important to keep a straight and consistent line so other riders and drivers can predict where you’re going.
  • Share the Road:
    • Ride single file in traffic or on trails. Leave room for cars, pedestrians, and others at intersections or places where you pull over. Take turns in small groups when going through an intersection so other users also have a chance to proceed.
  • Leave Space Between Yourself and Others:
    • Leave enough room when riding to be able to dodge obstacles without putting others in danger. Remember also that other riders might not be comfortable if you come too close.
  • Always Pass Others on the Left and Call Out When Passing:
    • It’s safer to pass on the left since road debris or potholes are more commonly on the shoulder. Also, most riders will not be expecting you on their right.
  • Announce Obstacles and Approaching Traffic:
    • Call and point out obstacles and traffic for others behind you.

 

Source: http://www.albertabicycle.ab.ca/rec/Tips%20for%20Group%20Riding2.pdf (accessed April 29, 2006)

 

 

Aspen Parks and Recreation

Safety and Ethics

·        Hikers and bikers going up a path have the right of way.

·        Bikers should yield to rollerbladers and pedestrians.

·        Please be a responsible pet owner and pick up after your pet.

·        Deposit all garbage into bear proof trash bins.

·        Be considerate of the environment. Stay on designated trails and be respectful of plants and wildlife.

·        Proper snowshoes are required for working on Nordic trails. 

Source: http://www.aspenrecreation.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=standardpage&mainid=237&yId=9&zId=4 (accessed April 20, 2006)

 

 

Bear River Outdoor Recreation Alliance

Trail etiquette

·        All of our groomed trails are two way trails - people can travel either direction

·        Always yield to the downhill skier by stepping off the trail

·        Stay to the right of the trail as you travel

·        Avoid stopping where others cannot see you - blind corners and trail intersections

·        Those pulling sleds, please do not use the ski tracks (these are the parallel lanes set for cross-country skiing)

·        Snowshoers are also asked not to use the ski tracks

·        Observe any posted and closed signs

·        Do not assume that motorized user will yield to non-motorized users

·        If you encounter snowmobiles in the ski area, be polite and educate why this is a closed area

·        Dogs on the trail.

o       Keep your dog under control at all times. Carry a leash and use it when necessary. Be considerate of other trail users, (not all skiers are happy to see dogs on the trail)

o       Try to limit two dogs per group. Dog packs cause more problems and congestion on the trails.

o       Clean up after your dog. Carry a small shovel or plastic baggie to scoop and flick dog waste off the trail.

o       Be a good ambassador for the sport of cross-country skiing, help others who do not know.

Source: http://www.evanstonoutdoors.com/trailetiq.html (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

Blueribbon Coalition

 

Code of Ethics

 

·        I will respect the rights of all recreationists to enjoy the beauty of the outdoors. I will respect public and private property.

·        I will park considerately, taking no more space than needed, without blocking other vehicles, and without impeding access to trails.

·        I will keep to the right when meeting another recreationist. I will yield the right-of-way to traffic moving uphill.

·        I will slow down and use caution when approaching or overtaking another recreationist.

·        I will respect designated areas, trail-use signs and established trails.

·        When stopping I will not block the trail.

·        I will not disturb wildlife. I will avoid areas posted for the protection of feeding wildlife.

·        I will pack out everything I pack in, and will not litter.

·        I realize that my destination objective and travel speed should be determined by my equipment, ability, the terrain, weather, and the traffic on the trail. In case of an emergency, I will volunteer assistance.

·        I will not interfere with or harass others. I recognize that people judge all trail users by my actions.

·        As a motorized trail user, I will pull off the trail and stop my engine when encountering horse back riders (it is also a good idea to take off your helmet and greet the riders).

 

Source: http://www.sharetrails.org/index.cfm?page=505 (accessed April 20, 2006)

 

 

Boulder Area Trails Coalition

Open Space Trail Etiquette

·        Respect Our Open Space

o       Do not disturb the wildlife.

o       Stay on existing trails.

o       Don't short-cut switchbacks.

o       Avoid very wet and muddy conditions. If you encounter muddy sections, go through the mud; don't go around it.

o       Leave plants, rocks, and artifacts as you find them.

o       Keep the trail clean. Carry everything you bring into open space back out with you.

o       Obey seasonal and area closures.

o       Leave gates as you find them.

·        Respect the Rights of Others

o       Do not block the trail.

o       Keep right, except when passing.

o       Pass with care. Let others know you are about to pass.

o       Do not spook horses. Move to the lower side of the trail if possible.

o       Slower traffic has the right-of-way.

·        Dog Owners

o       All dogs must be on leash and under control at all times on all Boulder County Open Spaces (other public lands may allow voice and sight control as noted at the trail heads).

o       Pick up after your dog.

·        Equestrians

o       Let other users know when it's safe to pass your horse.

o       Do not ride on a muddy trail.

o       Slow to a walk when approaching others.

·        Bicyclists

o       Ride only on designated trails.

o       Yield the right-of-way to all other users.

o       Control your bike. Always be ready to stop.

o       Ride slowly in single file when passing or being passed.

o       Maintain traction; skidding damages the trail.

o       Do not ride in the mud.

o       Do not ride around waterbars.

o       Downhill riders yield to uphill riders.

Source: http://bcn.boulder.co.us/batco/batco2_etiquette.htm (accessed April 20, 2006)

 

 

The Camel Trail Partnership

 

Code of Conduct

 

·        Walkers have right of way

o       The Trail has many different users including older people & people with mobility problems who find the level surface suitable for their use.

·        Please keep your dogs under close control

o       Dogs that leave the Trail can cause damage to adjoining private land, the river & its wildlife.

·        Horse riders, please keep to a walking pace

o       This reduces damage to the surface & the likelihood of an accident involving other users.

·        Cyclists, please keep your speed down

o       High speed makes it harder to avoid other users & thus causes accidents. Try to warn people of your approach.

·        Please be considerate to all other users of the Trail

o       Inconsiderate behaviour whilst using the Trail can spoil people's enjoyment of it.

·        Please clean up after your dog & do not drop litter

o       Litter is unsightly, takes years to biodegrade & can be very dangerous. Dog faeces are a particular nuisance.

·        Please respect the privacy of adjoining properties & landowners

o       There is no public access to any adjoining land, or to the river, except on signed paths.

·        Please use the Trail safely

o       Cyclists are advised to wear a safety helmet & to carry a puncture repair kit. Cycling with your dog on or off a lead is very dangerous.

 

Source: http://www.ncdc.gov.uk/media/adobe/q/l/CamelTrailCode_1.pdf (accessed April 26, 2006)

 

 

Canada Trails – Skiing

Skier's Code of Ethics

·        Always buy a trail pass when skiing at a commercial center. Your trail fee helps pay for grooming and maintenance of the trails.

·        When stopping, step off the trail to leave room for other skiers to pass.

·        On double-tracked trails ski single-file except when overtaking.

·        When a skier behind calls out "track," move to the right to give them room to pass. (In Quebec if someone calls "piste" it's not an insult, just French for "track".)

·        Avoid cutting off other skiers when entering trails or overtaking.

·        Ski in the specified direction on one-way trails.

·        Descending skiers have right-of-way on hills. Climbing skiers should move as far to the right of the trail as possible when oncoming skiers approach.

·        Fill in sitzmarks after falling on trails.

·        Pack out any garbage that you have brought with you. Leave nothing but tracks, take nothing but pictures.

·        Avoid walking or snowshoeing on ski trails--footprints decrease grip and glide.

·        Skating on classically groomed trails will similarly disrupt the grip and glide of classic skiers.

·        Leave your dog at home--dogs not only leave paw prints (and more unpleasant things) but can also cause an accident.

·        Stick close to the trail--you may get lost or your tracks may lead other skiers astray.

·        Respect private property. Some landowners are gracious enough to allow use of their land. Trespassers may cause this privilege to be revoked.

Source: http://www.canadatrails.ca/xc_ski/xctips.html (accessed on April 20, 2006)

 

 

Canada Trails - Hiking

 

Hiker’s Code of Ethics

 

·        Park your care well off the road and away from private driveways

·        Stay on the trail.  Taking a cutoff on a switchback trail will cause increased erosion.  Making a detour around a muddy patch will destroy vegetation.

·        When hiking above the treeline, stay off fragile alpine moss, lichen and wildflowers.

·        Keep off private property.  Landowners often give permission for the trail to pass over their land and may revoke that privilege if people stray all over their land.

·        Some parks do not allow dogs because they may run off and chase the wildlife.  If you do take our dog hiking, make certain that it stays under control and clean up after it.

·        Avoid hiking when the trails are wet, especially in the early spring, as this can lead to trail erosion.

·        A fire should only be started if you are camping and it is a special camp fire container. Fires are not permitted when the forest fire index is high.

·        If you smoke, make certain that your cigarette is completely extinguished when you are finished and carry the butt out with you.

·        When nature calls, go off the trail and keep a least 100 yards from streams and lakes to avoid contaminating the water.  Bury your toilet paper and feces several inches deep.

·        Pack out any garbage that you have brought with you.

·        Leave nothing behind – not even footprints.

·        Take nothing except photographs.  Leave wildflowers and other plants for others to enjoy.

·        Don’t feed the wildlife.  Increasing a species’ food supply can disturb the balance of nature.

·        When meeting a horseback rider, step off to the right of the trail and stand still until the rider passes.  Any fast movement may frighten the horse.

·        Don’t throw rocks or anything else over the side of mountains – they may strike someone passing below.

 

Source: http://www.canadatrails.ca/hiking/hk_tips.html (accessed on April 18, 2006)

 

 

Canada Trails – Mountain Biking

 

Mountain Biking Code of Ethics

 

·        Ride only on trails that are designated for mountain biking and that are open.  Riding on wet trails during the spring melt-off can cause erosion and ruin the trail.

·        Yield to pedestrians and horseback riders. If a horseback rider signals you, pull over to the side to avoid spooking the horse.

·        Ride under control at all times

·        Avoid skidding when braking – it can destroy vegetation and create erosion problems

·        Pack out everything that you have brought with you.

·        Avoid disturbing wildlife.

 

Source:  http://www.canadatrails.ca/mtb/mtbtips.html (accessed April 20, 2006)

 

 

Canadian All-Terrain Vehicle Distributors Council

 

ATV Safe Rider Code

 

  • Know Your Operator's Manual
  • Check the ATV Before You Ride
  • Wear Your Helmet
  • Protect Your Eyes and Body
  • Get Qualified Training
  • Ride Off-Road Only, Never on Public Roads
  • Ride With Others – Never Alone
  • Ride Within Your Skills
  • Carry No Passengers
  • Respect Riding Area Rules
  • Keep Noise Levels Low
  • Ride Straight – No Alcohol or Other Drugs
  • Preserve the Environment
  • Be Courteous to All You Meet
  • Lend Your ATV to Skilled Riders Only
  • Always Supervise Youngsters

 

Source: http://www.catv.ca/ (accessed April 29, 2006)

 

City of Albuquerque

Trail Etiquette

·        Be Courteous

o       Trails are for the enjoyment of all visitors. Please be courteous and respectful when encountering fellow trail users.

·        Pack it in - Pack it out

o       Keep your impact to a minimum when on the trail - take your trash out.

·        Stay on Established Trails

o       Well-built trails are designed to protect the land from erosion and promote preservation. When users cut their own trails they promote degradation of the fragile landscape and wildlife habitat.

·        Yield

o       All users must slow and stop for horses. Cyclists must also yield to hikers.

·        Announce Yourself

o       Let people know when you are approaching from behind and that you are passing on the left. Pass on the Left.

·        Share the Trail

o       Keep to the right of the trail and allow faster users enough room to pass on the left.

·        Keep Dogs Leashed

o       Promote wildlife preservation, enhance the wilderness experience for other users, keep your pet safe and avoid hefty fines by keeping your dog properly leashed.

·        Clean Up after Your Dog

o       Not only does dog excrement stink, but it also spreads disease to other dogs and pollutes groundwater. Some trailheads provide "Mutt Mitts" to clean up after pets.

Source: http://www.cabq.gov/openspace/rules.html (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

City of Duluth Parks and Recreation

Trail Etiquette

·        Always stay on the trail

·        Dogs must be leashed at all times

·        Pick up after your pet

·        Be courteous when meeting on the trail

·        Downhill yields to uphill, stay to the right

·        Pick up litter

·        Please do not use the trails when they are wet

·        Avoid muddy areas on the trails

Source: http://www.ci.duluth.mn.us/city/parksandrecreation/Secondarypages/trails.htm (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

The City of Edmonton

 

Rules of the Trail

 

·        Respect groomed ski trails and avoid damaging the ski tracks. Fill in craters if you fall onto the track and tread lightly if you must travel along a ski trail. Please try to use ungroomed trails for walking, running, cycling or walking dogs.

·        Observe directional signage as many ski trails are one-way.

·        Yield right of way to skiers travelling downhill.

·        Signal that you are passing by calling out “track.”

·        Step out of the tracks or pull off to the right-hand side of the trail to rest or to allow others to pass. Stopping on the trail causes congestion and accidents.

·        Skiing with a dog can be very dangerous to you and others. Park bylaws state that you must be in control of your dog at all times.

·        Avoid skiing in fragile natural habitats and disturbing animals.

·        Be positive and communicate!

·        Most trails are “multi-use” and require cooperation among users

 

Source: http://www.edmonton.ca/CommPeople/ParklandServicesBranch/SkiSense.pdf (accessed April 29, 2006)

 

 

City of Fayetteville

 

Bicycle and Walking Trail Etiquette

 

·        Always keep to the right, allow others to pass on the left.

·        Use proper hand signals, especially on denser routes.

·        No motorized vehicles are allowed on the trails at any time.

·        Dogs and other pets must be kept on a leash at all times.

·        Vandalism, littering, dumping, firearms, and excessive noise are not permitted on the trails.

·        Absolutely no alcoholic beverages are allowed on the trails.

 

Source: http://www.tele-works.com/htbin/webware/default.asp?HR=47-20&agency=fayetteville_city&perform=TXT (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

City of Minnetonka

 

Trail Etiquette and Safety

 

·        If you stop, move off the trail.

·        Travel on the right. Single file usage is preferred. 

·        Pass on the left, only when safe. Pass only in a single
  file line. 

·        When overtaking fellow trail users, warn them by
  activating a bell, horn, or whistle and saying "Passing
  on your left" or "Passing."

·        Stop at road crossings and  look for cars. 

·        Proceed at a reasonable speed (15 mph maximum). 

·        Obey all traffic signs. 

·        Proceed slowly around blind curves, steep hills, and
  bridges. 

·        Yield to slower trail users. 

·        Watch for children, strollers, dogs on leash, wildlife,
  and other trail users. 

·        Watch for wet or slippery surfaces, sand, acorns,
  rocks or washouts.

·        Dogs: Trails And Parks

o       Dogs must be on a close leash (6' or less). 

o       Pick up and properly dispose of dog droppings. Dispensers with plastic bags for droppings are placed along the trail. Please use them!

 

Source: http://www.eminnetonka.com/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC=%7B70F34C13-D1D7-45A5-B8CB-EA85F0182A5C%7D (accessed April 21, 2006)

 

 

City of Phoenix

Trail Etiquette

·        Phoenix mountain preserves are open, undeveloped desert areas. Hikers can encounter rocky terrain, rattlesnakes and other potential hazards native to the Sonoran Desert. Observing trail etiquette will help to ensure that your preserve outing is a safe one.

·        ALWAYS stay on a designated trail. Phoenix city ordinances prohibit trailblazing

·        Learn to share the trails with all other users. In general, bike riders yield to both hikers and horseback riders; hikers yield to horseback riders. However, for all trail users, downhill yields to uphill.

·        Use common sense and courtesy while on the trails. Announce your intentions and slow your pace when passing someone on the trails.

·        Do not litter.

·        Destruction or removal of plants, animals, historical, prehistoric or geological sites are prohibited.

·        Do not chase or harass wildlife.

·        Avoid putting your hands and feet anywhere you cannot see.

·        Remember the 3 C’s: Courtesy, Communication and Common Sense.

Source: http://phoenix.gov/PARKS/hikesafe.html (accessed April 21, 2006)

 

City of Renton

 

Trail Etiquette

 

·        All Users...

o       Obey all trail signs and regulations

o       Show courtesy for other trail users at all times

o       Keep dogs on leash, maximum length 8 feet (Dogs are not allowed in Gene Coulon Memorial Beach Park & Kennydale Beach Park)

o       When entering or crossing a trail at an uncontrolled point, yield to traffic already on the trail

o       No group of trail users shall occupy more than half of the trail as to impede the normal movement of trail users

o       Motor vehicles are not allowed on City of Renton trails

·        Pedestrians...

o       Listen for audible signals and help faster trail users pass safely

·        Bicyclists...

o       Cyclists are required to wear safety helmets on all trails in King County

o       Yield to pedestrians

o       Always give an audible (voice, bell, horn) warning before passing another trail user

 

Source: http://www.ci.renton.wa.us/commserv/parks/ruleregs.htm (accessed April 29, 2006)

 

 

City of San Luis Obispo Parks and Recreation Department

 

Trail Etiquette

 

·        Stay on designated trail. NO SHORTCUTTING!

·        Keep your dog on a leash.

·        Please pick up after your dog.

·        Do not trespass!

·        The only public access to Cerro San Luis is off of Fernandez Rd., which is located off of the south bound Marsh St. on-ramp to HWY 101.

·        Do not harass the wildlife/livestock.

 

Source: http://www.ci.san-luis-obispo.ca.us/parksandrecreation/download/trailetiq.pdf (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

City of Saskatoon and the Nordic Ski Club of Saskatoon

 

Ski Trail Etiquette

 

·        Practice environmental ethics (pack it in -- pack it out).

·        Step off the trail during stops to allow other skiers to pass unhindered. For the same reason get up & off the trail quickly after falling down.

·        Yield to faster skiers, or call "track" if you see someone in your way.

·        Give the right of way to descending skiers on hills.

·        Ski on the right where there are double tracks.

·        Ski in the proper direction on one-way trails.

·        Leave your dog at home if skiing on groomed trails.

·        Walking on a ski trail (both classic tracks & skating lanes) is definitely a no-no!

 

Source: http://www.saskatoon.ca/org/leisure/facilities/pdfs/skitrail.pdf (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

City of Seattle

 

Trail Etiquette

 

·        Show courtesy to other trail users at all times.

·        Use the right side of the trail except when otherwise designated.

·        Always pass on the left.

·        Respect the rights of property owners.

·        Keep dogs on leash (maximum length 8 feet) and remove pet feces from trail.

·        Bicyclists

o       Municipal Code 11.44.120, County Code and State Code. You are responsible for the safe operation of your vehicle under City, County, and State Codes.

o       Yield to pedestrians.

o       Give audible warning when passing pedestrians or other bicyclists.

o       Ride at a safe speed. Slow down and form a single file in congested conditions, reduced visibility, and other hazardous conditions.

·        Pedestrians

o       Stay to the right side of the trail except when otherwise designated.

o       Watch for other trail users.

o       Be especially alert when running.

o       Listen for audible signals and allow faster trail users (runners and bicyclists) to pass safely.

·        See selected provisions of the Seattle traffic code for more information.

 

Source: http://www.ci.seattle.wa.us/transportation/biketrail.htm (accessed April 21, 2006)

 

 

City of Shelton Trails

Trail Etiquette

·        "Take only pictures, leave only footprints."  Leave all plants and animals where you find them for others to enjoy. 

·        Keep your voices down, especially around Hope Lake on Nell's Rock Road, because loud voices travel across the lake and bother everyone else along the shoreline.

·        Bikers traditionally yield to pedestrians.  Having said that, it would be gracious for hikers to step aside for bikers because it is harder for bikers to get off their bikes and walk.

·        Pick up trash others have left behind.

·        Keep dogs under control, remove droppings from trails. 

·        No ATVs, dirt bikes or other motorized vehicles - they tear up the trails and disrupt the park.

·        Use a map, pay attention, and be sure to stay on public property.  Learn how to follow simple trail markings. Don't carelessly wander into neighbor's yards and ask where you are.  Respect 'No Trespassing' signs.

·        Give fishermen plenty of space and some peace and quiet so the fish aren't scared away. 

·        Avoid talking on cell phones.  Preferably, turn them off.

·        Paugussett (Blue Dot) Trail: This trail is maintained by CFPA and is located partly on private property with the property owners' permission.  For that reason, it is especially important to stay on the trail and respect nearby home owners, or they could close the trail at any time! Mountain bikes, ATVs and dirt bikes are prohibited from this trail.

·        City of Shelton Open Space rules prohibit fires, ice skating, swimming, camping (unless you get special permission from the City), hunting, paintball, ice fishing and alcohol. 

Source: http://borntoexplore.org/trails/ettiquet_and_rules.htm (access April 21, 2006)

 

 

City of St. George

 

Trail Rules

 

  • No motorized traffic.
  • No fires, or firearms.
  • No alcoholic beverages.
  • Stay on trails; do not take short-cuts.
  • Littering is prohibited.
  • Pets must be leashed and their waste removed.
  • No soliciting or sales.
  • Speed limit is 20 m.p.h.
  • Obey all posted signs.

 

Source: http://www.sgcity.org/parks/sgtrailsinfo.php (accessed April 29, 2006)

 

 

City of St. Albert

 

Trail Etiquette

 

·        Keep Right

o       All users must keep right except when passing or turning left. Move off the trail to the right when stopping.

·        Caution

o       Follow trail travel, passing and speed guidelines as per cyclists. Be aware of proper skating and braking techniques before going on the trails.

·        Share Responsibility

o       Red Willow Park trails provide opportunities for all. Lead by example; help teach each other proper trail etiquette.

·        Yield

o       Yield to slower moving traffic: cyclists to pedestrians, joggers to walkers. Move off to the side of the trail for less mobile users.

·        Leash Your Dog

o       In designated On Leash areas, all dogs must be kept on a leash and under complete control of their handlers. These areas include all Red Willow Park Trails (including one metre on either side of the improved surface), School Grounds and Tot Lots, and all other spaces marked as On Leash Areas.

 

Source: http://www.stalbert.ca/admin/contentx/default.cfm?PageId=193 (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

Colorado State Parks

Sharing the Trail

·        Keep right and pass on the left. Stay as far to the right side of the trail as comfortable, except when passing another trail user. Give an audible signal with a horn, bell or voice before passing.

·        Downhill traffic yields to uphill traffic.

·        Slower traffic has the right-of-way. Faster traffic is responsible for yielding to slower or oncoming traffic.

·        Use caution when using headphones. You may not hear warnings from others.

·        Use lights at night. Collisions can be avoided if trail users can be seen. Use reflective clothing for extra protection.

·        Yield when entering or crossing paths and roads. Don't count on others stopping for you.

·        Stay on the trail. Trails are created to preserve precious outdoor resources. By staying on the trail, you lessen your impact and disturbance of wildlife. Step to the side and stop walking to prevent the trail from being widened excessively and limit impact on adjacent vegetation.

·        Respect private property. Do not cross fences. You may be trespassing.

·        Do not pick flowers or collect natural items. The rocks, flowers or berries you take from the trail area could be food or shelter for wildlife. Never peel bark, carve initials or break branches from living or dead trees.

·        Leave no trace. Food scraps, empty cans, bottles and other debris are unsightly and dangerous. Help protect our natural resources and wildlife by keeping the trail free of litter.

·        If you encounter wildlife stand still and let it pass. Watch. Don't chase.

Source: http://parks.state.co.us/trails_program/sharing.asp (accessed April 25, 2006)

 

Connecticut Horse Council

Trail Etiquette

·         Do not cross private property without permission.

·         Respect property owners.  Make sure that "you" have their permission to ride on or cross over their land.  Do not gallop across open fields, leaving hoof prints behind or destroying crops. Use common sense and stay to the edges. Again, it takes one bad experience to ruin it for everyone else.

·         Protect our environment.

·         Stay on the trail; never cut switchbacks

·         Avoid using trails when harmful conditions exist (mud season)

·         Avoid bringing your horse in bodies of water for a "swim"

·          Water crossings should be made where there are safe footings and avoid muddy bottom crossings whenever possible.

·         Cross tie your horse between trees to avoid damage caused by chewing and rubbing.

·         Be aware and sensitive about "road apples"

·         Train your horse to curb off to the side of the trail

·         Keep your horse moving rather than leaving the whole load in one spot

·         In some cases, on well used multiple use trails and Greenways, it's a good idea to dismount and move the manure over to the side, or go back & clean up.

·         Be aware of what you may leave behind, that others will see.  Clean up after yourself and your horse at your break or lunch stops and your horse trailer at the trailhead.

Source: http://www.cthorsecouncil.org/trailettiquette.html (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

The Countryside Agency (UK)

 

The Countryside Code – advice for the public

 

  • Be safe – plan ahead and follow any signs.
  • Leave gates and property as you find them.
  • Protect plants and animals, and take you litter home.
  • Keep dogs under close control
  • Consider other people

 

Source: http://www.countryside.gov.uk/WhoWeAreAndWhatWeDo/newcode.asp (accessed April 19, 2006)

 

 

Deer Valley Resort

 

Code of Conduct

 

·        Familiarize yourself with the trail systems and select routes within your ability level.

·        Don't ride or hike alone. Be prepared for emergencies.

·        Area not patrolled. Be self-sufficient and aware of changing weather and terrain conditions. Water, extra clothing, gloves, sturdy shoes and sunscreen are recommended.

·        Always yield to vehicles or horses.

·        Obey all trail signs and markings and only ride or hike on designated mountain biking and hiking trails.

·        Notify the lift operator for first-aid assistance, or call 435-645-6625.

·        Don't stop where you obstruct a trail or are not visible to others.

·        Respect the environment and wildlife.

·        Prior to using any lift you must have the knowledge and ability to load, ride and unload safely.

·        HELMETS ARE REQUIRED FOR BIKING.

·        NO SMOKING ON THE MOUNTAIN.

·        NO DOGS ON THE MOUNTAIN.

·        PLEASE DO NOT LITTER.

 

Source: http://www.deervalley.com/summer/hiking-scenic-rides/code-of-conduct.jsp (accessed April 26, 2006)

 

 

Devon County Council – Horseback Riders

 

Guidance for horse riders on the Tarka Trail between Servis and Petrockstow

 

·        The use of the Tarka Trail by horse riders does not create bridleway rights.

·        Riders should give way to other users of the Tarka Trail.

·        The route extends from the bridleway at Servis to Petrockstowe Station. Use of the Tarka Trail beyond these points is not permitted.

·        The route may only be joined or left at the public highway (or the bridleway at Servis). Other gates and access points may not be used.

·        All gates across the route should be left in a closed position.

·        Cantering or galloping is not permitted.

·        Jumps are not to be erected.

·        Riding in a group of more than 3 horses is not permitted.

·        The parking of horse boxes or vehicles used to bring horses to the Tarka Trail is not permitted in Tarka Trail car parks.

·        Hunting or following a hunt is not permitted.

·        Lights shall be worn after dark.

 

Source: http://www.devon.gov.uk/advisory_code_of_conduct_for_tarka_trail_users_2.pdf (accessed April 26, 2006)

 

 

Devon County Council – Multi-use Trails

 

Advisory code of conduct for Tarka Trail users

 

·        Be sensitive to the needs of others and follow this simple code.

·        Give Way! Cyclists always give way to walkers, people in wheelchairs and prams. Pass them slowly. If you cannot get past safely, stop and dismount.

·        Ring! Ring! Fit a bell on your bike. Special Tarka Trail bells are available from the Railway Carriage Visitor Centre at Bideford Station. Make sure other Tarka Trail users are aware of your presence. Ring your bell or call out a warning.

·        Relax! Take it easy! Keep your speed down; the Tarka Trail is not a racing track. Slow down and enjoy the scenery.

·        Watch out! The Tarka Trail is used by many more cyclists than walkers. Take care and be aware.

·        Two’s Company! When the Tarka Trail is busy, especially in the summer months, keep to just two abreast so as not to hinder other users.

·        Take the lead! Please keep your dogs under control at all times. The Tarka Trail is a haven for wildlife, which is vulnerable to disturbance. Cyclists in particular do not like being chased by dogs. If necessary, put your dog on a lead.

·        Mucky pups! Dog mess is unpleasant for everyone. Take a plastic bag and clean up after your dog. There are red dog bins along the Tarka Trail where it can be deposited.

·        Hoofing it! The Tarka Trail is used by horses between Servis and Petrockstowe. Approach considerately at all times. See Separate guidance for Horse Riders.

·        Please be considerate to other users.

·        Follow the Country Code and close all gates after you pass through.

 

Source: http://www.devon.gov.uk/advisory_code_of_conduct_for_tarka_trail_users.pdf (accessed April 26, 2006)

 

 

Du Page County

Trail etiquette

·        Slower traffic should stay to the right. Pass only on the left and only when your line of vision is unrestricted. Passing on a blind curve or hiss is risky. A polite call of "Passing on your left" can help warn others of your approach from behind.

·        Please leave room on the trail for others to pass. Single file is the best procedure for groups of people on a busy day.

·        Be extra careful when approaching horses. They startle easily, so slow down and give them as much room as possible.

·        When snow covers the ground, make every effort to avoid walking or riding in ski tracks. Classic cross country skiers are encouraged to use the outside of the trail, with all others using the inside.

·        Be aware of wildlife both on and off the trail. Remember, you are a visitor in their habitat.

·        Dogs are welcome on trails, but they must be leashed at all times. As a courtesy to other trail users, please clean up after your dog.

·        Practice "leave no trace" policies by packing out what you pack in.

·        To preserve nature's quiet and solitude, refrain from yelling or making any loud sounds.

 

·        Bikers

o       Wheels can be a great way to enjoy the beauty of the forest preserves, but cyclists should observe these special considerations:

o       Ride only on multipurpose trails that are at least 8 feet wide. If a forest preserve road or trail is posted with a sign showing a bike symbol with a slash, the trail is off-limits to bicycles due to dangerous conditions or ecologically sensitive areas.

o       Always ride single file on the right hand side of the trail except when passing on the left from behind. Always announce yourself by saying "Passing on your left."

o       Travel in a consistent manner.

o       Do not pass horses on a bridge. A bridge may cause even an experienced horse to be nervous.

o       Ride under control. Watch your speed, especially on curves and in parking lots.

o       Be aware of changing trail conditions.

 

·        Equestrians

o       As with cyclists, special care must be taken by horseback riders when using forest preserve trails:

o       Horses must be kept under control at all times. Horse racing is strictly prohibited.

o       Horses are prohibited in all picnic areas, campgrounds, off-leash dog areas, model airfields and other areas as posted.

o       Horse-trailer parking is permitted in designated areas only.

o       Please refrain from riding horses on trails during wet or muddy conditions.

 

Source: http://www.dupageforest.com/RECREATION/trails.html#Trail (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

East Coast Trail Association

 

Trail etiquette:

 

·        Do not litter. There are no garbage cans along the Trail.Volunteers should not have to clean up after you.

·        Out houses are located at campsites; elsewhere go at least 50 metres off the trail and far from steams or ponds. Dig a cat hole for solid waste and carry out paper.

·        No fires. Use a small camping stove.

·        Practice low impact camping. Camp in designated camp sites when possible. If camping elsewhere, please do so off the trail.

·        Keep dogs under control Leash when meeting other parties and at trailheads. Practice stoop and scoop on or near the trail.

·        Respect other hikers, private property and the trail.

·        Respect the wilderness quiet, keep disturbance to a minimum.

 

Source: http://www.eastcoasttrail.com/pdf/newsletter_spring_2005.pdf (accessed April 29, 2006)

 

Essex County Trail Association

Trail Etiquette

·        Obey ALL posted signs and trail regulations

·        Greet and thank landowners for allowing use of their property

·        Respect landowners' privacy (talk softy when passing residences)                     

·        Leave all gates in the position you find them                                                      

·        Do not smoke in the woods or on private land

·        Share the trails. If we don’t share, we all will lose!

·        Riders

o       Let mountain bikes pass when it is safe to do so. As a rule, they go faster than horses.

o       Stay off trails when they are wet; if you leave a hoof print, it is too wet.

o       Ride on the edge of fields only unless otherwise indicated

o       Alert other trail users when you approach from the rear and ask permission to pass

o       Approach and pass other trail users at a walk

o       Walk by stabled or pastured animals

o       Ride single file on the road

o       Stay off cross country ski tracks

o       Do not bring your dog when riding

o       Acknowledge motorists who slow down or stop

·        Walkers

o       Let mountain bikers and horses pass. Please do not hide in the trees. It scares the horses.   

·        Mountain Bikers

o       Say "hello" when you come up behind horses and hikers. You don’t realize how quiet you are. When meeting horses face on, please stop and say "hi." It helps the horses to not be afraid of you. 

·        Absolutely no motor vehicles should be used where prohibited.

·        If you are leaving prints (hoof, tire, or boot), it is too wet to be where  you are.

·        Whatever you take onto the trails, PLEASE take it out when you leave. No trash

·        If you bring your dog (where allowed), please make sure it is well behaved. Pick up after your dog. Don’t let it harass wildlife.                                                                                                 

 

Source: http://www.ayerfamily.org/ectaonline/trail_etiq.htm (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

The Forestry Commission (Great Britain)

Follow the forest code

·        Guard against all risk of fire.

·        Protect trees, plants and wildlife.

·        Leave things as you find them, take nothing away.

·        Keep dogs under control.

·        Avoid damaging buildings, fences, hedges, walls and signs.

·        Leave no litter.

 

Source: http://www.forestry.gov.uk/forestry/HCOU-4UFN9R (accessed April 26, 2006)

 

 

Forestry SA

 

The Forest Trail Code

 

·        Keeping to existing trails. Going .cross country. damages vegetation and can cause erosion.

·        Let someone know when and where you are going, and what time you.ll be back. Ensure you have enough clothing, water & food for the activity.

·        When riding wear a helmet and ride at a safe speed according to your experience, track conditions and terrain.

·        Consider other users. Walkers give way to cyclists and both should give way to horse riders. Courtesy is the key.

·        Avoid steep, muddy or loose surfaced trails as the tracks formed channel rainwater and contribute to erosion.

·        For your safety avoid forestry operations areas where tree felling or machinery are in - use keep an eye and an ear out for the signs.

 

Source: http://www.forestry.sa.gov.au/pdf/mtcrawforest-a3.pdf (accessed April 26, 2006)

 

 

Forillon National Park of Canada

 

Code of Conduct (Cross-Country Skiing)

 

·        Please obey the signs on the trails.

·        Keep at reasonable distance from the skier in front of you.

·        On down-slopes, wait until the person in front of you has reached the bottom before starting down.

·        Move off the trail promptly if you fall or decide to stop.

·        Offer your assistance to anyone in difficulty, and notify a park warden if necessary. Phone: (418) 892-5553 or 368-6440 (outside of office hours).

 

Soruce: http://www.pc.gc.ca/pn-np/qc/forillon/activ/activ4_e.asp  (accessed April 26, 2006)

 

 

Friends of the Delaware Canal

 

Trail Etiquette & Safety Guidelines

 

·        Be Courteous

o       All trail users including bicyclists, walkers, joggers, people with disabilities, and equestrians should be respectful of other users regardless of their speed, or level of skill.

·        Share The Trail

o       Cyclists yield to all other trail users and hikers yield to equestrians.

·        Signal When Passing

o       Let your fellow trail users know you're coming. A friendly greeting or bell is considerate and works well: don't startle others. Give a clear warning signal and reduce speed before passing. Signal may be produced by voice, bell, or horn.  Indicate "On your left" when passing on the left.

·        Low Bridge - Everybody Down

o       There is very little clearance under many of the Canal bridges. Duck when necessary.

·        Bridge Blind Spots

o       Canal bridges block your view of the towpath ahead. Make sure that the trail is clear before heading under the bridge.

·        Don't Block The Trail

o       When in a group, including your pets, use no more than half the trail, so as not to block the flow of other users.

·        Stay On The Trail

o       For nearly all of its length, the Delaware Canal State Park property is only 60 feet wide. Please do not wander onto adjoining private properties. Respect the rights and privacy of the owners.

·        Keep The Canal Clean

o       The Park's policy is carry in - carry out.

·        Be Informed

o       Please check trail signs and use Park maps. Get to know your Park staff. Visit the Delaware Canal State Park Headquarters, 11 Lodi Hill Road, Upper Black Eddy, PA 18972 (phone 610-982-5560) or the Friends of the Delaware Canal Visitors Center, 145 South Main Street, New Hope, PA 18938 (phone 215-862-2021).

·        Special Tips For Hikers/Joggers

o       Stay to the right of the trail - pass on the left.

o       Safe multiple use on the towpath requires your cooperation.

o       Always yield to equestrians.

o       Announce yourself when overtaking other trail users.

o       When hiking or jogging with a dog, obey posted leash regulations.  Keep a short leash on your dog when passing (or being passed by) horses, cyclists, or other pedestrians. Remember that other trail users may be frightened by your dog, and be unsure how to pass safely. Please be 
considerate to other trail users and always clean up after your dog.

·        Special Tips For Cyclists

o       Approach and pass other trail users with care - you are obligated to yield to all other trail users. When approaching from behind, announce yourself (and the number of other cyclists in your group) well in advance so that you do not startle other trail users. Reduce speed in order to pass safely.

o       Approach blind curves with caution-assume someone is coming in the opposite direction.

o       Use the appropriate hand signals for turning, stopping, etc.

o       Should your approach cause a horse to spook or become frightened, be considerate and stop.  Wait for the rider to tell you it is okay to pass.

o       Be prepared for your trip. Wear a helmet at all times. The key to successful and enjoyable ride requires a knowledge of regulations, an understanding of one's personal ability, equipment, and preparedness for the unexpected.

·        Special Tips For Equestrians

o       Make sure your horse has the temperament and training for riding on congested public trails. Busy multi-use trails are not the proper place for schooling green horses.

o       Use common sense in crowded areas (cantering/galloping on crowded trails endangers everyone).

o       Move to the right to allow fellow trail users to pass.

o       Announce your intention to pass other trail users, and reduce speed in order to pass safely. Pass on the left only.

o       Remove your horse from the trail if you begin experiencing behavior problems.

o       As a courtesy to others in your group, use appropriate hand signals for turning, slowing, etc., and give verbal warnings for dangers on the trail (e.g. holes, low branches.)

o       Remember that other trail users may not be familiar with horses or their reaction to new experiences. Your horse may be another trail users first introduction to horses, what you do may be a reflection of the local horse community. Carefully answer questions about your horse. You are an ambassador for the entire equestrian community.

 

Source: http://www.fodc.org/info/fodctrl1.htm (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

Gap Creek Trail Alliance

 

Mountain Biking Offroad Code

 

·        Minimise conflict          

o       Be courteous and respect other users of the Reserve. Inform others you are behind them and how many are in your group.

o       Pass safely. Horses and walkers can be startled by the approach of a bicycle.

o       Always give way to horses, walkers, runners and other users of the track.

o       Keep left. Apply the road rules where possible.

o       Slow down approaching blind spots like corners. Other users may be ahead.

·        Minimise Risk

o       Maintain control of your bicycle. Ride at a safe speed.

o       Ride within your ability and ride according to the track conditions.

o       Look after yourself. Always take a spare tube, bicycle pump and tyre levers.

o       Carry water and food as necessary. Carry a mobile phone and tell someone your intended route.

·        Minimise Environmental Impact

o       Avoid skidding. Skidding reduces your control and damages the track.

o       Stay on the track. Cutting corners and track widening degrade the bush environment.

o       Avoid riding on wet tracks.

o       Carry your rubbish with you, including punctured tubes.

 

Source: http://www.qorf.org.au/01_cms/details.asp?ID=476 (accessed April 26, 2006)

 

 

Glasgow City Council

 

Code of Conduct

  • Don’t litter. Always leave the trails carrying at least as much as you arrived with.
  • Ride only in the direction indicated. Pollok’s mountain bike trails are designed to allow you to ride narrow trails without meeting riders coming the other way, but watch out for other park users.
  • Don’t block the trail. If you need to stop on the circuit, make sure that you and your bike are clear of the trail and visible to oncoming riders.
  • Ride with consideration for others. The circuits are designed to allow riders of varying abilities to develop their skills or just enjoy the trails.
  • Fast moving riders should wait until it is safe to overtake and let slower riders know which side they’re passing on.
  • Slower riders should signal their intentions to move over and allow passing where safe.
  • If in doubt, always brake and give way to slower riders.
  • Stay in control. Off-road surfaces and gradients can vary quickly, and losing concentration for even a second can cause problems. Do not attempt to ride terrain beyond the capabilities of you or your bike. If in doubt, dismount and walk or use an easier part of the circuit to continue to build your skills safely.
  • Ride light. Aim to ride with as little impact on the trail as possible. Stick to existing trails and don’t cut corners or ride around boggy areas.
  • Think ahead. Bring what you need to enjoy your riding. Carry a drink, snacks, tools and spares for the time you’ll be out, and for your trip home. Bring spare clothes to protect against feeling cold after your ride.
  • Wear a helmet. When mountain biking always wear a helmet and consider other protective equipment. Proper cycle clothing will make your riding safer and more comfortable. Do not wear clothing that can catch in your bike and always wear shoes that will grip your pedals.
  • Maintain your bike. Only ride on the circuit if your bike is well maintained and of a suitable type. Poor quality or un-serviced bikes can break easily and be difficult to control.
    • If in doubt, contact your local cycle shop for advice. A well maintained bike is much more fun to ride and is less likely to need parts replaced.
  • Look after the environment. By keeping the circuit and woodland around it in good condition we can protect its future and continue to enjoy it. Please use signed entrance and exit points.

 

Source: http://www.glasgow.gov.uk/en/Residents/Parks_Outdoors/Activities/Cycling/glasgowmountainbikecircuitcodeofconduct.htm (accessed April 29, 2006)

 

 

Greene County Greene Ways

 

Trail etiquette

 

·        Remember the trail may be shared by hikers, bikers, horses, walkers and other users.

·        Use only non-motorized forms of transportation*

·        Bicyclists should yield to all other users.

·        All users should yield to horses.

·        Keep right, except to pass.

·        Announce passing to other users.

·        Pass with caution.

·        Move off paved trail when stopped.

·        Please yield to emergency vehicles.

·        Respect private property.

·        Clean up after your pet.

·        Observe the speed limit.

·        Heed all signs.

·        Please don’t litter.

·        Read and obey all rules and regulations posted at staging areas.

* Persons requiring motorized wheelchairs have access to the trail.

* Vehicles restricted 42” wide and 96” long.

Source: http://www.co.greene.oh.us/parks/bike_trails.htm (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

Greenwood Village, Colorado

 

Trail Etiquette

 

·        Village trails are for walking, hiking/jogging, biking, and horseback riding. Remember to yield right-of-way to pedestrians and horses. See the diagram below.

·        Trail users are the eyes and ears of the trail system. Report problems, e.g., downed trees, holes (prairie dog holes or holes in asphalt), or broken fences to Greenwood Village City Hall at 303-486-5773, or fax 303-804-4120.

·        Watch for cars turning from driveways and cross streets. Make sure to obey all traffic lights and signs.

·        The maximum trail speed is 15 mph. Motorized vehicles are not allowed on Village trails.

·        Respect the trails. Littering, dumping, and misuse of any public property is not allowed. No glass bottles are allowed on Village trails.

·        Use common courtesy and stay on the trails. Bicyclists should not ride on athletic fields or residential lawns.

·        When hiking/jogging with a dog, obey posted leash regulations. Keep a short leash on your dog when passing (or being passed by) horses, cyclists, or other pedestrians. Please pick up any dog waste and discard in trash receptacles. Dog Bag stations are located throughout the trail system and are supplied with bags for your use.

·        Bicyclists should remember that they are subject to the same regulations and penalties as a motor vehicle operator on the street.

·        If you choose to wear a stereo/headphone set, make sure that the volume neither prevents you from hearing what is happening around you nor disturbs other trail users.

·        If you come upon an injured rider (horse or bicycle), get help immediately. If you come upon a riderless horse, do not approach the horse if you are uncomfortable with horses, seek professional help (e.g., the Village Police Department). If you choose to approach the horse, speak softly to let it know you are there, do not chase it. Approach the horse from the side.

·        Animals on the trail may act unexpectedly.

·        If you are unsure about approaching someone with a horse or dog, ask the handler for guidance.

 

 

Etiquette for cyclists

 

·        Horses have the right-of-way over bicyclists. Yield appropriately.

·        Wear a bicycle helmet and use guard clips on trouser cuffs if your bike has no chain guard.

·        Inspect your bike for loose or worn parts before riding on trails.

·        Use the appropriate hand signals for turning, stopping, and say “on your left” when passing hikers/joggers or equestrians.

·        Never carry a passenger unless your bicycle is equipped for two riders.

·        Equip your bike with a horn or bell. Install a light and reflectors to enhance the visibility of your bike at night.

·        Be mindful of horses and pedestrians, use extra caution around them.

·        Invest in a high quality security lock. Lock both wheels and the frame and do not leave the bicycle outside at night.

 

 

Etiquette for Equestrians

 

·        Wear shoes or boots with heels so they do not slide through the stirrups.

·        Always wear a riding helmet to prevent head injuries in case of a fall.

·        Make sure your horse has a good temperament and proper training for riding on public trails.

·        Advise other trail users, i.e., bicyclists or joggers, of your horse’s temperament, e.g., a horse with a tendency to kick should always wear a red ribbon on the trail or a stallion should wear a yellow ribbon. Assume that not everyone will know what these ribbons mean, so be prepared to explain or take the necessary precautions while using Village trails.

·        Stay on equestrian approved trails. Horses are permitted on all asphalt trails; however, dirt trails are preferred for the safety of the horse and rider.

·        Obey posted speed/gait limits and use common sense in crowded areas, e.g., slow down when you pass others on the trail and never gallop past another trail user.

·        Pass on the left only and use appropriate hand signals for turning, slowing, etc., and give verbal warnings for dangers on the trail (e.g., holes, low branches).

·        Be courteous to other users of public trail heads/parking areas and do not clean out your trailer at these locations.

 

Source: http://www.greenwoodvillage.com/documents/Park%2C%20Trails%2C%20Recreation/etiquette.pdf (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

Heartland Trail Riders

 

Code of Ethics

 

·        I will be a good sportsman.

·        I realize that people judge all OHV's by the way that I ride.

·        I will use my influence with others to promote safe sportsman like conduct.

·        I will not damage trees, shrubs or any other land forms.

·        I will not litter any trails, camping areas, lakes or streams.

·        I will respect the rights and properties of others.

·        I will always lend my helping hands for whoever is in distress.

·        I will always make myself and my OHV available in any search or rescue procedures.

·        I will know and uphold any and all local, state and federal laws regarding the safe operation of my OHV whenever and wherever I may ride.

·        I will respect the rights of all other sportsman to enjoy their recreational activities as I do mine.

·        I will not ride where prohibited or without permission.

·        I will not harass, only enjoy our wildlife.

·        I will not operate any OHV under the influence of drugs, alcohol or medications.

·        I will have a great time!!!

 

Source: http://htrc.org/ethics.htm (accessed April 20, 2006)

 

 

Heritage Rail Trail

 

Trail Etiquette

·         The trail is only open during daylight hours.

·         Alcoholic beverages are prohibited.

·         Use only non-motorized forms of transportation.

·         Persons having motorized wheelchairs have access to the trail.

·         Remember the trail is shared by many different users - hikers, bikers, skaters and walkers.

·         Bicyclists should yield to other users.

·         Keep right except to pass.

·         Announce passing to other users and pass with caution.

·         Move off paved trail when stopped.

·         Please yield to law enforcement, maintenance and emergency vehicles.

·         Respect private property.

·         Clean up after your pet.

·         Observe speed limit.

·         Heed all signs.

·         Don't litter.

·         Read and obey all rules and regulations posted at staging areas.

Source: http://www.heritagerailtrail.org/trail_etiquette.htm (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

Ice Age Park and Trail (US National Park Service)

 

Trail Ethics and Use

 

  • The Ice Age Trail relies heavily on the support of private landowners. Please respect their rights and stay on the Trail at all times.
  • As the Trail evolves toward completion, hikers should be on the lookout for possible new Trail additions, closures or re-routes not shown on the map.
  • The Ice Age Trail is primarily for walking, hiking and backpacking. Snowshoeing and cross-country skiing are popular winter uses. Only where clearly marked are other types of activities such as biking, horseback riding, snowmobiling or all-terrain/off-road motorized vehicle use allowed on the Trail.
  • Camping is only allowed in designated areas. Where primitive, dispersed camping is allowed, set up your tent at least 100 feet from all rivers, lakes, streams, roads and trails. Always do a final camp-sweep before departing your site to ensure you've left no trash or belongings behind.
  • Camp fires are allowed only in designated fire rings.
  • Never feed wild animals. Feeding wildlife damages their health, alters natural behaviours, and exposes them to predators and other dangers.
  • Leave only footsteps. Take only pictures. Carry out all your garbage, including used toilet paper, hygiene products and leftover food.
  • Most sections of the Ice Age Trail are closed during deer gun season. Please use caution and wear bright colors during all other hunting seasons.
  • Don't bypass switch-backs as you hike the Trail.
  • The IAT is marked by yellow blazes. Visit the National Park Service for more information on trail signs.
  • Thank a volunteer for the existence and maintenance of most Ice Age Trail
  • segments. Consider joining them sometime for a work party on the Trail.

 

Source: http://www.iceagetrail.org/infocenter/ethics.html (accessed April 19, 2006)

 

 

Idaho ATV Association Inc.

 

Our Code of Riding Ethics

 

·        I will respect the rights of all recreationalists to enjoy the beautiful outdoors.

·        I will respect public and private property.

·        I will park considerately, taking no more space than needed, without blocking other vehicles, and without impeding access to trails.

·        I will keep to the right when meeting another recreationalist. Yield the right-of-way to traffic moving uphill.

·        I will slow down and use caution when approaching or overtaking another.

·        I will respect designated areas, trail-use signs and established trails.

·        When stopping, I will not block the trail.

·        I will not disturb wildlife.

·        I will avoid areas posted for the protection of feeding wildlife.

·        I will not litter and will pack out everything I pack in.

·        I realize that my destination objective and travel speed should be determined by my equipment, ability, the terrain, weather, and traffic on the trail.  In case of emergency, I will volunteer assistance.

·        I will not interfere with or harass others.  I recognize that people judge all trail users by my actions.

·        Motorized trail users should pull off the trail and stop their engines when encountering horseback riders. It is also a good idea to take off your helmet and greet the riders.  

 

Source:http://www.idahoatv.org/ATV%20Assoc%20%20Folder/code_of_ethics.htm (accessed April 20, 2006)

 

 

Illinois Department of Natural Resources

 

Hiking: A Few Simple Rules

 

·        Stay on designated hiking trails.

·        Don't pick any flowers.

·        Confine your pet to a leash.

·        Wear comfortable walking or hiking shoes.

·        Take water with you on long hikes.

·        Use insect repellent to help ward off mosquitoes and other insects.

·        Be sure to protect yourself from wood ticks, carriers of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and deer ticks, carriers of Lyme disease.

 

Source: http://dnr.state.il.us/lands/Landmgt/Programs/hiking/ (accessed April 20, 2006)

 

 

International Mountain Biking Association

 

Rules of the Trail

·        Ride On Open Trails Only.

o       Respect trail and road closures (ask if uncertain); avoid trespassing on private land; obtain permits or other authorization as may be required. Federal and state Wilderness areas are closed to cycling. The way you ride will influence trail management decisions and policies.

·        Leave No Trace.

o       Be sensitive to the dirt beneath you. Recognize different types of soils and trail construction; practice low-impact cycling. Wet and muddy trails are more vulnerable to damage. When the trailbed is soft, consider other riding options. This also means staying on existing trails and not creating new ones. Don't cut switchbacks. Be sure to pack out at least as much as you pack in.

·        Control Your Bicycle!

o       Inattention for even a second can cause problems. Obey all bicycle speed regulations and recommendations.

·        Always Yield Trail.

o       Let your fellow trail users know you're coming. A friendly greeting or bell is considerate and works well; don't startle others. Show your respect when passing by slowing to a walking pace or even stopping. Anticipate other trail users around corners or in blind spots. Yielding means slow down, establish communication, be prepared to stop if necessary and pass safely.

·        Never Scare Animals.

o       All animals are startled by an unannounced approach, a sudden movement, or a loud noise. This can be dangerous for you, others, and the animals. Give animals extra room and time to adjust to you. When passing horses use special care and follow directions from the horseback riders (ask if uncertain). Running cattle and disturbing wildlife is a serious offense. Leave gates as you found them, or as marked.

·        Plan Ahead.

o       Know your equipment, your ability, and the area in which you are riding -- and prepare accordingly. Be self-sufficient at all times, keep your equipment in good repair, and carry necessary supplies for changes in weather or other conditions. A well-executed trip is a satisfaction to you and not a burden to others. Always wear a helmet and appropriate safety gear.

 

Source: http://www.imba.com/about/trail_rules.html (accessed April 19, 2006)

 

 

Indy Parks and Recreation

Greenway/Trail Etiquette

·        Trail hours:  Dawn to dusk

·        Keep to the right; communicate before passing.  Let other trail users know when you are approaching from behind.  Signal by saying "passing on your left" and give others time to respond accordingly.

·        Maintain control and safe speed.  Adjust your speed to accommodate for other users, traffic and trail conditions.

·        Pedestrians have the right-of-way on the Greenways.  Bicycle riders and in-line skaters must yield to all other trail users.  Parents: please keep children from wandering into oncoming trail lane to avoid accidents.

·        Share the trail and be courteous.  Indy Parks Greenways are multi-use recreational trails appropriate for walkers, joggers, in-line skaters and bicycle riders.  Please Respect others, regardless of their mode of travel. 

·        Do not trespass or cut through adjacent properties or yards to access a Greenway.

·        Stop for cross traffic and obey all signage.

·        Respect the trail environment.  Do not disturb the wildlife or the many native plants and wildflowers that grow along the Greenway.

·        Pick up litter and place in trash bins. Please remove all pet waste. 

·        Keep pets on short leashes (4-6 feet max.) If using a retractable leash, please keep pets near you.

Source: http://www.indygov.org/eGov/City/DPR/Admin/rules.htm (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

International Bicycle Fund

 

User Guidelines For Multi-use Trails

·        Be Courteous. All trail users, including bicyclists, joggers, walkers, wheelchairs, skateboarders, bladers and skaters, should be respectful of other users regardless of their mode, speed or level of skill.

·        Be Predictable. Travel in a consistent and predictable manner. Always look behind before changing positions on the trail.

·        Don't Block The Trail. When in a group or with your pets, use no more than half the trail so as not to block the flow of other users.

·        Keep Right. Stay as near to the right side of the trail as is safe, except when passing another user.

·        Pass On The Left. Pass others, going your direction, on their left. YIELD TO SLOWER AND ON-COMING TRAFFIC. Use hand signals to alert those behind you of your moves. Look ahead and back to make sure the lane is clear before you pull out and pass. Pass with ample separation and do not move back to the right until safely past. REMEMBER: KIDS AND PETS CAN BE UNPREDICTABLE.

·        Stopping. When stopping, move off of the trail. Beware of others approaching you from behind and make sure they know you are pulling over.

·        Give Audible Warning BEFORE Passing. Give a clear signal by using voice, bell or horn before passing. Give the person you are passing time to respond. Watch for their reaction. So that you can hear these signals, don't wear headphones on the trail.

·        Obey All Traffic Signs And Signals. Use extra caution where trails cross streets. Stop at all signs and intersections and be cautious when crossing driveways. When entering or crossing a trail yield to traffic on the trail.

·        Use Lights At Night. Be equipped with lights when using a trail at any time from dusk to dawn. Bicyclists should have a white light visible from five- hundred feet to the front and a red or amber light visible from five-hundred feet to the rear. Other trail users should have white lights visible from two-hundred fifty feet to the front, and a red or amber light visible from two-hundred fifty feet to the rear.

·        Don't Use A Trail Under The Influence Of Alcohol Or Drugs. Don't overestimate the safety of any trail. You may need all of your reflexes quickly -- don't have them impaired.

·        Be Respectful Of Private Property. Trails are open to the public, but often the land on the side of the trail is private property. Please respect all property rights.

·        Clean Up Litter. Do not leave glass, paper, cans, plastic, or any other debris on or near a trail. If you drop something, please remove it immediately.

·        Have You Outgrown Trails? Trails have engineering and design limits. If your speed or style endangers other users, check for alternative routes better suited to your needs. Selecting the right location is safer and more enjoyable for all concerned.

·        Always Exercise Due Care And Caution.

Source: http://www.ibike.org/education/trail-sharing.htm (accessed April 18, 2006)

 

 

Island Rock Crawlers Four-Wheel Drive Society

 

Code of Conduct

 

·        The Law -Obey the laws, even off-road. Don't consume alcohol or drugs while driving, and transport and store your firearms safely.

·        No Littering - Pack out what you packed in! Pick up litter even if it isn't yours. Encourage others to do so.

·        Preserve the Heritage - Don't disturb old mining camps, ghost towns, or other historical artifacts. Leave rocks, flowers, wood, and antlers in their natural state for others to see and enjoy.

·        Be Courteous - to all others on the trail and in camp. Don't make excessive noise. Supervise your kids and pets.

·        Respect Private Land - Get owner's permission before entering their land. Don't assume public access. Leave all gates as you found them, respect trail signs, and do not harass or spook wildlife or livestock.

·        Preserve the Environment

o       Stay on existing roads and trails, use local maps.

o       Don't create new trails, cut switchbacks or drive through meadows, alpine tundra, rivers or streams.

o       Leave the land and its vegetation as you find it.

o       If you can't make it, winch! Don't dig pits with your tires!

o       If you rock-pile, put them back when you're done, don't make permanent changes to the trail.

o       If driving somewhere will ruin the road or the environment - don't go there!

o       Cross streams only at recognized crossings, and don't stir up the water unnecessarily.

·        Campsites - Camp at an existing campsite whenever possible. Camp away from stream banks and lakeshores. Leave camp cleaner than it was found. In the wilderness, leave no traces of your presence.

·        Fires - Be aware of forest fire hazards, use a fire ring, and avoid wasteful, dangerous bonfires. Use a shovel and water to make sure a fire is completely out before you leave. Cigarettes cause fires if discarded carelessly. Use your ashtrays.

·        Toilets - Carry a shovel to dispose of human waste, and don't dispose of it near streams, lakes, or campsites.

·        Vehicles

o       Maintain your vehicle. Leaks are bad for the environment.

o       If you spill, clean it up.

o       Carry basic tools, a shovel, jack, water, a first-aid kit, fire extinguisher, spare oil, tire, CB radio, etc.

o       Know your vehicle and what it can do. Don't drive a trail that is beyond your limits, or your vehicle's.

o       If a trail gets too difficult - turn back.

o       Use a spotter to help you get through the tough spots, and remember this:

o       You are responsible for any damage to your vehicle or done by your vehicle.

·        Winches - Make sure your winch and cable are in good condition. Know how to use it. Read the owner's manual. Always use gloves, and keep spectators well away. Drape something over the cable in case it breaks.

·        Always Observe, Record, and Report - Poaching, illegal dumping, vandalism, littering, careless use of firearms- all these things should be reported to the CRD, the local Conservation Officer, or the RCMP.

·        Common Sense - Avoid travelling alone. Keep the people you are travelling with in sight. Tell someone where you are going and when you'll be back. Stick to your plan!

·        Have Fun! We are very fortunate to live in such a beautiful place.  Explore it, Protect it, Share it and Enjoy it!

 

Source: http://www.can4x4.com/irc/portfolio/conduct.html (accessed June 6, 2006)

 

 

Jefferson County Open Spaces

 

Trail Etiquette: Be Courteous & Communicate!

 

·        Mountain Biker Responsibilities

o       You are required to yield to all other trail users. Downhill riders should yield to uphill traffic. Anticipate other trail users around corners and blind spots and be prepared to stop and pass safely.

o       Pass with care and alert other users in advance with a vocal warning.

o       Keep your bike under control and travel at a safe speed.

o       Always wear a safety helmet.

o       Don't ride in the mud or on trails where ruts can be created. Try to use an alternate trail. Skidding and sliding around turns damages the trail.

o       County law requires that dogs be on a leash. Responsible bicyclists will not ride with dogs, since this can be dangerous.

 

·        Hikers Responsibilities

o       Listen for and be aware of other trail users and yield with care to equestrians. Pass equestrians with care.

o       Keep your dog on a leash and under control at all times.

o       Avoid stepping off trails.

 

·        Equestrian Responsibilities

o       Travel at a safe speed. Be especially careful when visibility is limited.

o       Communicate with other trail users. Let others know if your horse is safe to pass.

o       Don't ride in the mud. If the trail is muddy, try to use an alternate trail. Deep hoof prints make it difficult for others to use the trail.

 

Source: http://www.co.jefferson.co.us/jeffco/openspace_uploads/trail_Etiquette.pdf  (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

Kansas Trails Council

Common Sense, Guidelines, and Etiquette for Trail Use

·        Know your limits in terms of endurance and ability and do not be tempted to exceed them.

·        Never forget that the trail that you are on exists only because of the hard work and efforts of many volunteers and the support of local, state and federal agencies. Enjoy and appreciate these efforts and respect the trail at all time.

·        Whatever you carry in, you carry out. Please be careful not to leave trash anywhere on the trail. The next trail user has no wish to view your refuse and sooner or later  trail volunteers will donate their time and efforts to clean up the carelessness or indifference of inconsiderate trail users. If you find trash on the trail, please do your good deed for the day and carry it out to an appropriate container.

·        If there are limbs or other obstructions on the trail take the time to remove them. If they are too large to move and interfere with safe passage along the trail then please take the time to notify the appropriate authority of its existence after you have left the trail.

·        These trails are on public land and you should constantly remind yourself that there may be others on the trail at the same time that you are and that you need to respect their rights and expectations on the trail.

o       Allow faster riders or walkers to pass you on the left.

o       If you wish to pass someone on the trail let him or her know that you are on the trail behind him or her and that you are going to pass  on the left.

o       Please avoid shouting and making excessive noise while on the trail. Most people are on the trail to enjoy a degree of serenity and solitude offered by the trail.

o       Do not alter or remove signs and trail markings. Replacing signs and markings is expensive and time consuming for volunteers. Even more importantly anything that you might do of this nature could have a serious, adverse or even dangerous affect for someone else on the trail.

o       Many trails are multi-use trails. Be aware of this and watch for bikers, hikers and/or horses. Be especially careful to not surprise and spook horses on the trail since this creates potential danger to both the horse and the rider.

·        Do not attempt to alter a trail in any way. Formal trails have been laid out with careful consideration given to the possibilities for erosion and respect for the ecology and natural beauty of the area.

·        Observe and obey all signs and instructions that may be associated with a particular trail. Make certain that the trail is designated for your particular interest and usage before entering it.

·        Many trails are adjacent to private property. Observe no-trespassing signs and avoid entering private property.

·        Whenever possible avoid frightening or disturbing wildlife or livestock that may be in close proximity to you.

·        Mountain bikers should wear a helmet at all times. Mountain bikers still have something to prove to the more conservative elements in the trail community. Prove yourself worthy of the trails designated for mountain biking by staying on the trail, by not creating ruts by riding into muddy areas, by being aware of and careful of hikers and horses, and by practicing minimum impact cycling leaving nothing more than a vague waffle print. Since mountain biking is new to many trails there is a prevailing attitude of "you abuse it you lose it"--the privilege of riding the trail that is. The plain truth of the matter is that responsible mountain bikers probably do less to harm or disturb the ecology of an area than anyone else does.

·        If you live near a trail that you love to ride or hike, volunteer to help maintain the trail. Whether you believe it or not every trail needs your help to keep it in the best possible condition.

·        Regard every trail as a privilege granted to you, not as an irrevocable right that you have.

Source: http://www.terraworld.net/kansastrails/archived%20web%20pages/Trail%20Notes.htm (accessed April 21, 2006)

 

 

Kickapoo Valley Reserve

General Guidelines & Etiquette Tips

·        Respect the trails - clean up your litter (pack out what is packed in); protect the trail environment, e.g., do not remove things that belong on trails or blaze new trails.

·        Become the eyes and ears of the trail system. Report problems, e.g., washed out bridges or downed trees and debris to the Kickapoo Valley Reserve Office.

·        Give back to the trails you use--get involved with trails maintenance.

·        Share the trails - cyclists yield to all other trail users and hikers yield to equestrians. Stay right on multi-use trail segments.

·        On crowded trails, proceed single file.

·        Slower traffic should keep to the right of the trail; faster users pass on the left.

·        Do not pass on narrow bends--pass only when you can clearly see the trail and traffic approaching from the opposite direction.

·        When passing other trail users, provide adequate warning and reduce speed.

·        Animals on the trail may act unexpectedly. If you are unsure about approaching someone with a horse or dog, ask the handler for guidance.

·        Dogs must be on leash from April 15 thru July 31 to protect nesting birds and under voice command or leash control at all other times.

·        Do not ride during rain or when the trails are wet or muddy; footprints, bicycle ruts, and hoof prints can damage the trails.

·        If you choose to wear a stereo/headphone set, make sure that the volume neither prevents you from hearing what is happening around you nor disturbs the other trail users.

·        If you come upon an injured rider (horse or bicycle), get help immediately. If you come upon a riderless horse, do not approach the horse if you are uncomfortable with horses--seek professional help. If you choose to approach the horse, speak softly to let it know you are there--do not chase it. Approach it from the side.

Etiquette for Equestrians

·        Make sure your horse has the temperament and training for riding on public trails. Busy multi-use trails are not the proper place for schooling green horses.

·        Advise other trail users of your horse's temperament, e.g., a horse with a tendency to kick should always wear a red ribbon on the tail or a stallion should wear a yellow ribbon. Assume that not everyone will know what these ribbons mean, so be prepared to explain or take the necessary precautions to avoid trouble.

·        Dogs must be kept on a leash from April 15 through July 31 to protect nesting birds and under owner voice or leash control at all other times.

·        Move to the right to allow faster trail users to pass.

·        Announce your intentions to pass other trail users and reduce speed in order to pass safely. Pass on the left only.

·        Move to the side of the trail if you begin experiencing behavior problems.

·        Stay on equestrian approved trails.

·        As a courtesy to others in your group, use appropriate hand signals for turning, slowing, etc., and give verbal warning for dangers on the trail (e.g., holes, low branches).

·        Remember that other trail users may not be familiar with horses or their reactions to new experiences. Your horse may be another trail user’s introduction to horses; what you do is a reflection of the horse community. Cheerfully answer questions about your horse. You are an ambassador for the entire equestrian community.

·        Do not clean out your trailer in the parking area.

·        On multiple use trails, step off the trail (if possible) if your horse needs to relieve himself or kick the droppings off the trail.

 Etiquette For Cyclists

·        Approach and pass other trail users with care--you are obligated to yield to all other trail users. When approaching from behind, announce yourself (and the number of other cyclists in your group) well in advance so that you do not startle other trail users. Reduce speed in order to pass safely. Pass horses as far to the left as possible to avoid unintentional contact. Red ribbons in a horse's tail are an indication that it may kick if approached too closely from behind.

·        Stay on approved bicycle trails.

·        Obey posted speed/gait limits and use common sense in crowded areas.

·        Approach blind curves with caution--assume someone is coming in the opposite direction.

·        Dogs must be kept on a leash from April 15 through July 31 to protect nesting birds and under owner voice or leash control at all other times.

·        Use the appropriate hand signals for turning, stopping, etc.

·        Should your approach cause a horse to spook or become frightened, be considerate and stop. Wait for the rider to tell you that it is okay to pass.

·        Be a positive reflection of the local cycling community.

 Etiquette for Hiker/Joggers

·        Stay to the right of the trail--pass on the left.

·        Always yield to equestrians.

·        If you wish to approach a horse, ask the rider for guidance.

·        Announce yourself when overtaking other trail users.

·        When hiking/jogging with a dog, obey posted leash regulations. Keep a short leash on your dog when passing (or being passed by) horses, cyclists, or other pedestrians.

·        Remember that your dog may frighten other trail users, and they may be unsure how to pass safely.

·        Dogs must be kept on a leash from April 15 through July 31 to protect nesting birds and under owner voice or leash control at all other times.

Source: http://kvr.state.wi.us/home/trail_etiquette.htm

 

 

Leave No Trace

 

Leave No Trace Principles

 

·        Plan ahead and prepare.

·        Travel and camp on durable surfaces.

·        Dispose of waste properly.

·        Leave what you find.

·        Minimize campfire impacts.

·        Respect Wildlife.

·        Be considerate of other visitors.

 

Source: http://www.lnt.org/programs/lnt7/index.html (accessed April 18, 2006)

 

 

Little Miami Scenic Trail

Trail Etiquette

·         Remember: the Trail is shared by hikers, bikers, horses, walkers, and other users.

·         Use only non-motorized forms of transportation. (Persons requiring motorized wheelchairs have access to the trail.)

·         Bicyclists should yield to all other users.

·         All users should yield to horses.

·         Keep right except to pass.

·         Announce passing, to other users. Pass with caution.

·         Move off paved trail when stopped.

·         Please yield to law enforcement, maintenance and emergency vehicles.

·         Respect private property.

·         Clean up after your pet.

·         Observe speed limit.

·         Heed all signs.

·         Don't litter.

Source: http://www.yellowsprings.com/bikepath.html#te (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

Manitoba Recreational Trails Association Inc.

Trail Etiquette

·        Plan ahead – be aware of local trail conditions.

·        Wheels yield to heel.

·        Stay on the trail, and respect private property including crops, livestock and equipment. Close all gates, and keep your pets on a leash.

·        Take only photos, leave only footprints.

·        Camp and light fires only in designated areas.

·        Avoid taking shortcuts or creating braided trails around wet areas.

·        Bury human waste at least 100 metres from water bodies.

·        Grain and alfalfa pellets are recommended for horses as hay can introduce noxious weeds. Scatter manure. Avoid soft or marshy edges when watering horses.

·        Do not leave horses unattended.

·        Cyclists and horses avoid soft trail when wet.

·        Fall is hunting season in much of Manitoba. Consult Manitoba Conservation regarding hunting areas and wear blaze orange if on the trail.

·        Do not drink the water unless purified by filters or tablets

·        Enjoy the trail!

Source: http://www.mrta.mb.ca/b_etiquette.html (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

Maynard Trails (Maynard, Massachusetts)

 

Trail Etiquette

 

·        Remember to stay on trails.

·        Respect private property. If property is marked or obviously private, avoid trespassing.

·        Carry out your own trash. Feel free to pickup after others who are less considerate.

·        Do not pick any vegetation.

·        Do not feed the wildlife.

·        Keep dogs on a leash or under control and clean up after them.

·        No motorized vehicles.

·        No campfires without special permits.

·        Share the trails - be courteous. 

 

Source: http://web.maynard.ma.us/gov/conscom/trails/trailetiquette.htm (accessed April 21, 2006)

 

 

Mesabi Trail

 

Trail User Guidelines

 

  • A Wheel Pass is required for persons aged 18 years and older using wheels on the Trail or in the corridor, such as bikes or inline skates. Wheelchairs are exempt. Display this pass while on the Trail or within the corridor.
  • The Mesabi Trail is a non-motorized trail, except in winter, when snowmobiles are allowed within the Trail corridor only where designated. ATVs are not allowed within the trail corridor at any time.
  • The Trail corridor is defined as any land or water area and all facilities thereon within the right-of-way of the trail designated as the Mesabi Trail.
  • Operate bicycles, inline skates, wagons, strollers and wheelchairs on the right-hand side of bikeways and roadways. Non-motorized vehicles and motorized wheelchairs shall not exceed 36 inches in width.
  • Deposit litter or waste in receptacles or dumping stations.
  • Keep pets on a leash no longer than six feet in length.
  • Holes or trenches may not be dug within the Trail corridor.
  • Signs or advertisements shall not be placed within the Trail corridor.
  • Start fires only in officially designated fire rings, stoves or grills. Do not leave a fire unattended and be sure the fire is extinguished before leaving the area.
  • Loaded weapons are not allowed within the Trail corridor nor can any missile or other projectile be discharged from a weapon upon, over, or across the Trail corridor.
  • Alcoholic beverages are not allowed within the Trail corridor.
  • Do not remove, alter, injure or destroy any tree, plant, rock, soil or mineral.
  • Camping and horseback riding are allowed only in designated areas.
  • Please follow basic "Rules of the Trail" at all times - keep to the right, announce yourself when approaching another trail user, use proper hand signals, and wear a helmet.

 

Source: http://www.mesabitrail.com/trail/guidelines/ (accessed April 29, 2006)

 

Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District

 

Sharing the Trails

 

·        Please be courteous to other trail users.

o       Always yield to equestrians. Allow other trail users to pass. When in a group, avoid blocking the trail.

·        Stay alert.

o       Horses and slower moving individuals may be startled by faster moving trail users. Make your presence known to other trail users well in advance, particularly when approaching from behind.

·        Stay on designated trails.

o       Prevent injury to yourself and damage to natural resources by staying on designated trails.

·        Observe trail speed limits.

o       A 15-mph speed limit is enforced on all trails (5-mph when passing). At no time may a trail user operate at a speed greater than is reasonable, prudent, or safe, as conditions warrant.

·        Observe District regulations.

o       You are responsible for knowing open space preserve regulations. A complete list of all District ordinances is available at the District office.

·        Bicyclists

o       Bicyclists are required to wear ANSI- or Snell-approved bicycle helmets on all District lands.

o       Control your speed at all times and obey the 15-mph speed limit. Slowly approach blind turns in anticipation of other trail users and obstacles that are beyond your view.

o       Always yield to all other trail users. On wide trails, slow down and pass with care (5-mph speed limit when passing).

o       Ride only on trails designated for bicycle use. Off-trail use is strictly prohibited.

o       Racing and reckless riding are prohibited.

o       Horses and slower moving individuals may be startled by faster moving trail users.

o       Make your presence known to other trail users well in advance, particularly when approaching from behind.

o       When encountering equestrians and hikers on narrow trails, stop and wait for them to pass or signal you through.

o       Yield to other bicyclists traveling uphill.

·        Runners

o       Slow down and allow oncoming hikers and equestrians to pass on one side of the trail.

o       If you are approaching from behind, alert other trail users of your presence and pass carefully.

o       Stop and wait for equestrians to pass or signal you through.

o       When approaching bicyclists, slow down and pass when it is safe.

·        Hikers

o       Always yield to equestrians.

o       Be alert for approaching bicyclists and runners.

o       If you are approaching from behind, alert other trail users of your presence and pass carefully.

·        Equestrians

o       Some visitors may be intimidated by horses.

o       When you meet other trail users, inform them of the safest way to pass.

o       You are responsible for maintaining control over your horse at all times.

o       If your horse is high-spirited, please warn other trail users.

o       Ride only on trails designated for equestrian use. Off-trail use is strictly prohibited.

·        Trail users with dogs

o       Dogs are currently allowed on all trails at the following open space preserves: Coal Creek, Foothills, Fremont Older, Pulgas Ridge, including an off-leash area, Sierra Azul (Kennedy-Limekiln Area), St. Joseph’s Hill, and Thornewood, as well as designated trails at Windy Hill and Long Ridge Open Space Preserves. Contact the District for maps and further information on preserves accessible to dogs.

o       Dogs must be on a maximum six-foot leash at all times. Contact the District for guidelines on retractable leashes, and please clean up after your dog.

o       Some trail users are frightened by dogs; communicate with others and always keep your dog under control.

o       Because some dogs are unpredictable, step to one side of the trail with your dog to allow enough room for other trail users to pass.

 

Source: http://www.openspace.org/activities/downloads/sharing_the_trails.pdf (accessed April 21, 2006)

 

 

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

 

Snowmobilers' code of ethics

 

·        I will be a good sports enthusiast. I recognize that people judge all snowmobile owners by my actions. I will use my influence with other snowmobile owners to promote fair conduct.

·        I will not litter on trails or camping areas. I will not pollute lakes or streams.

·        I will not damage living trees, shrubs, or other natural features. I will go out only when there is sufficient snow so that I will not damage the land.

·        I will respect other people's property and rights.

·        I will lend a helping hand when I see someone in distress.

·        I will make myself and my vehicle available to assist search and rescue parties.

·        I will not interfere with or harass hikers, skiers, snowshoers, ice anglers, or other winter sports enthusiasts. I will respect their rights to enjoy our recreation facilities.

·        I will know and obey all federal, state/provincial and local rules regulating the operation of snowmobiles in areas where I use my vehicle. I will inform officials when using public lands.

·        I will not harass wildlife. I will avoid areas posted for the protection or feeding of wildlife.

·        I will stay on marked trails or marked roads open to snowmobiles. I will not snowmobile where prohibited.

 

Source: http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/snowmobiling/ethics.html (accessed April 19, 2006)

 

 

Missouri Conservationist

 

The ATV Operator’s Pledge

 

·        I will respect public and private property.

·        I will use only ATV-designated areas and established trails.

·        I will respect the rights of all outdoor users.

·        I will not litter.

·        I will not operate an ATV in a river or stream.

·        I will respect stream-side vegetation and its importance to the stream.

·        I will respect all natural areas and minimize my impact.

·        I will obey all laws pertaining to the use of off-road vehicles.

·        I will always think about safety.

 

Source: http://www.mdc.mo.gov/conmag/2002/06/60.htm (Accessed April 20, 2006)

 

 

The Mountain Bay Trail

 

Code of Ethics / Rules for Trail Users:

·        I will be a good sports enthusiast. I recognize that people will judge all trail users by my actions. I will use my influence with other trail users to promote fair conduct.

·        I will not pollute streams. I will not litter trails or camping areas. I will place refuse in containers provided.

·        I will not damage living trees, shrubs, or other natureal features.

·        I will stay on marked trails.

·        I will respect other peoples property and rights.

·        I will not interfere with other ttrail users. I will respec their rights to enjoy our recreational facilities.

·        I will not harrass wildlife.

·        I will lend a helping hand to persons in distress.

·        I will know and obey all federal, state, and local laws and rules regulating recreational trail useage.

·        I will not allow my pets to run freely on the recreational trails.

 

Source: http://www.mountain-baytrail.org/shawano.htm (accessed April 29, 2006)

 

 

Musketawa Trail

 

Basic Trail Etiquette

 

·        Obey all trail use rules posted on the trail. \

·        Stay to the right except when passing.

·        Pass slower traffic on the left, yield to oncoming traffic when passing.

·        Give a clear warning signal when passing: I.E. call out "Passing on your left".

·        Travel at a reasonable speed.

·        Keep pets under control on a leash, and clean up after them.

·        When you stop for any reason get off the paved/main trail.

·        Do not litter.

·        Respect private property.

·        Campfires and camping are not allowed on the trail right of way.

·        Do not disturb vegetation or wildlife.

 

Source: http://www.musketawatrail.org/etiquette.htm (accessed April 26, 2006)

 

 

New Hampshire Trails Bureau

 

Trail Etiquette for Multi-use Trails

 

·        All trail users are responsible for watching and listening for others. Traveling on the right side of the trail removes indecision about the proper side on which to pass. Always ask for and get permission if you must pass on the left. Slow down significantly and use caution at curves and junctions. Surprises are not safe - it doesn't matter what you are riding.

·        Yield to a horse and rider. Be sure the horse has seen and heard you; give the horse adequate room to pass.

·         A hiker should call out a friendly hello and request that s/he would like to pass. The horse rider may need to pull over, to provide the safest position to the hiker. If the rider has his horse under control, proceed; if not, allow the rider to move his horse beyond you.

·        Motorized recreation vehicles can usually be heard coming, and the horse rider may be well out of the way. If not, please shut off the motor and allow the rider to get a distance beyond you before starting up. Turn off engines any time a horse appears nervous. Ask the rider what you can do to help.

·        Bicycles are quiet and not heard by horse or rider. Speak out so the horse hears a human voice. It may be necessary for the bicyclist to remain stopped, allowing the horse and rider the opportunity to get out of the way, before proceeding.

·        Promote a positive relationship with a friendly greeting. Calm, pleasant conversations reassure the animal that all is ok.

·        A horse rider may choose to move his horse on without stopping. This is not a lack of courtesy but a decision on how best to control the animal. Or the rider may request that you continue past. Ask the rider to advise you.

 

Source: http://www.nhtrails.org/Trailspages/TrailEtiquette.html (accessed April 21, 2006)

 

 

New River Gorge National Park

 

Trail Etiquette

·         Pack it in, Pack it out. Pocket all your trash, including cigarette butts and candy wrappers, and dispose of it properly.

·         Wildflowers, wildlife, and historic objects all contribute to the beauty we came to see. Leave them undisturbed.

·         Keep pets on a leash at all times.

·         Bicycles are only permitted on designated bike trails.

·         Courtesy and common sense on the trail can help provide an enjoyable experience for all. Respect the rights of others.

Source: http://www.nps.gov/neri/trails.htm (accessed April 25, 2006)

 

 

New Zealand Department of Conservation

 

Environmental Care Code

 

·        Protect plants and animals.

o       Treat New Zealand’s forests and birds with care and respect. They are unique and often rare.

·        Remove rubbish.

o       Litter is unattractive, harmful to wildlife and can increase vermin and disease. Plan your visits to reduce rubbish, and carry out what you carry in.

·        Bury toilet waste.

o       In areas without toilet facilities, bury your toilet waste in a shallow hole well away from waterways, tracks, campsites, and huts.

·        Keep streams and lakes clean

o       When cleaning and washing, take the water and wash well away from the water source. Because soaps and detergents are harmful to water-life, drain used water into the soil to allow it to be filtered. If you suspect the water may be contaminated, either boil it for at least 3 minutes, or filter it, or chemically treat it.

·        Take care with fires

o       Portable fuel stoves are less harmful to the environment and are more efficient than fires. If you do use a fire, keep it small, use only dead wood and make sure it is out by dousing it with water and checking the ashes before leaving.

·        Camp carefully

o       When camping, leave no trace of your visit.

·        Keep to the track

o       By keeping to the track, where one exists, you lessen the chance of damaging fragile plants.

·        Consider others

o       People visit the back country and rural areas for many reasons. Be considerate of other visitors who also have a right to enjoy the natural environment.

·        Respect our cultural heritage

o       Many places in New Zealand have a spiritual and historical significance. Treat these places with consideration and respect.

·        Enjoy your visit

o       Enjoy your outdoor experience. Take a last look before leaving an area; will the next visitor know that you have been there?  Protect the environment for your own sake, for the sake of those who come after you, and for the environment itself.

 

Source: http://www.doc.govt.nz/pdfs/Environmental-care-code-checklist.pdf (accessed April 26, 2006)

 

 

North Dakota Parks and Recreation Department

 

ATV Riders Code of Ethics

 

·        I will learn all the mechanical controls and safety devices of my ATV by reading the owner's manual, and I will check them each time before I ride.

·        I will wear a helmet at all times and other protective clothing suitable to the environment when I ride.

·        I will ask an instructor or qualified rider to teach me proper riding skills, and I will practice until my skills are well developed before entering an unfamiliar area.

·        I will ride in the company of others, never alone.

·        I will not carry passengers on my ATV.

·        I will be courteous to other riders and persons by offering right-of-way and respecting areas that are posted closed.

·        I will not modify the ATV exhaust system to create more noise, nor will I ride an ATV on the street.

·        I will not use alcohol or other drugs when I ride.

·        I will not litter the area nor damage plant life where I ride.

·        I will only lend my ATV to someone I have personally instructed in its safe and appropriate use.

·        I will not let young or inexperienced riders ride unsupervised.

·        I have made this pledge because I am a thoughtful ATV rider. I accept my responsibility for preserving the sport and the safety of its enthusiasts.

 

Source: http://www.ndparks.com/trails/atv/atvtips.htm (accessed April 20, 2006)

 

 

North Idaho Centennial Trail

Rules of the Trail

  • Keep to the right of trail and pass on the left
  • Alcoholic beverages prohibited.
  • Pedestrians have right-of-way.
  • All users remain on designated trails.
  • Do not block the trail
  • Bicycle speed limit: 15 mph
  • Maximum of two bicycle riders abreast at any time. If pedestrians are present, only single file riding allowed.
  • Pets must be on a leash.
  • Do not disturb plants or animals.
  • Pack-it-in / pack-it-out.
  • No structures, including vendor equipment, or organized events without required permits.
  • No motorized vehicles allowed on trail.
  • Camping is prohibited.
  • Marking or painting on trail is prohibited.

Source: http://www.northidahocentennialtrail.com/RulesoftheRoad.htm (accessed April 25, 2006)

 

Nova Scotia Trails

Basic Trail Etiquette

·        Be aware of other trail users.

·        Stay to the right of the trail (except when passing).

·        Slow down at corners.

·        Always clean up after yourselves.

·        Obey all the trail rules.

·        Give a clear warning signal when passing: call out passing on your left.

·        Always look ahead and behind when passing.

·        Travel at reasonable speed.

·        Keep pets on a leash.

·        Move off the trail when letting others pass.

·        Yield to other trail-users when entering and crossing trail.

·        Do not disturb wildlife.

·        Stay on the trail (respect the environment, do not venture off the trails).

·        Do not litter.

·        Do not drink or contaminate water sources (wash 100 feet away from any nearby water source).

·        Use provided toilet facilities (If you are unable to find a facility, dig a hole 6 inches deep at least 200 feet from any open water).

·        Do not make fires (Use picnic areas and grills if provided).

·        Respect wildlife. Your surroundings are home to many plants and animals: you are the visitor.

·        Obey all posted signs. These indicate special restrictions that apply to the trail you are on. 

Hiking with Animals

·        Clean up after your animals.

·        Keep them on a leash or lead.

·        Give larger animals right of way

·        Do not let your animal disturb wildlife or others.

·        Keep them on the trails.

Basic Trail Etiquette: Hikers, Walkers, Backpackers

·        Move off the trail whenever possible for other trail users.

·        When meeting someone riding a horse, step off the trail and speak calmly.

·        Avoid ski tracks in the winter time.

Basic Trail Etiquette: Mountain Bikers, Bikers

·        Know your ability, equipment and the area.

·        Move off the trail for less mobile users.

·        Do not ride under conditions where you leave evidence of passing, i.e. after rain or snow.

·        Stay on the trail.

·        Do not ride through streams.

·        Make presence known at corners or blind spots.

·        Control your bicycle.

·        Always yield trail.

Basic Trail Etiquette: Equestrians

·        Practice minimum impact techniques.

·        Observe speed limits.

·        Always clean up after your horse.

·        Avoid campsites used by other trail users.

·        Keep horses in campsite only long enough to unpack or pack them.

·        Stock tied to trees ruins trees and turf: do so only for a short time. Use tie lines.

·        Never tie horses within 200 feet of lakes, streams or springs.

Basic Trail Etiquette: ATVs, Four Wheelers

·        Approach pedestrians slowly, pull over and turn off your engine.

·        When passing someone, follow at a safe distance until you reach a safe place to pass: pass slowly.

·        Minimize noise with proper care and operation of your vehicle.

·        Respect trail closures.

·        Stay on the trail.

·        Do not ride on areas that are either wet, have loose soil, steep slopes, meadows or swamps.

·        When camping, ride directly to and from your campsite or turn off your vehicle and push it.

Basic Trail Etiquette: Cross Country Skiers

·        Ski on the right side.

·        Yield to those coming downhill or who are faster. To step out of the track, lift your skis so you don’t disturb the track.

·        When breaking trail, keep skis wider than normal.

Basic Trail Etiquette: Snowmobilers

·        Operate at appropriate speeds.

·        Do not ride on tracks made for skiers.

·        Avoid running over vegetation.

·        Respect trail closures.

·        Avoid late night riding near populated areas or lodges.

Source:http://www.novascotiatrails.com/page.cfm?pid=258&tid=1&hid=99 (accessed April 20, 2006)

 

Oklahoma City Trails

Etiquette and Safety

·        For your safety, helmets and other protective equipment are recommended for cycling, rollerblading, and skateboards.

·        Please be courteous to all other trail users.

·        Keep to the right of the path except when passing.

·        Use a bell or your voice to warn others when passing.

·        Slow down when approaching other trail users or street crossings.

·        To prevent injury to yourself and damage to natural resources, please stay on the designated trails.

·        Weapons of any kind are prohibited.

·        Fires are prohibited.

·        Please leave plants and animals undisturbed.

·        Leash and pick up after your dogs.

·        Do not litter. Do your part to keep the trails clean.

·        Glass bottles and containers are prohibited.

·        Be aware of trail conditions and proceed with care when conditions are poor, such as wet, snowy, icy or strong winds.

·        Do not block trail. Groups move to the right or form a single line.

·        Please use proper lights on bicycles front and rear and/or light colored clothing at night.

·        Do not use trails while under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs.

·        No unauthorized motor vehicles allowed on the trails.

·        Trail users are responsible for knowing and following trail guidelines. Parents, please educate your children on these guidelines

Source: http://www.okc.gov/query.html?trails/index.html (accessed April 21, 2006)

 

 

Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation

 

Oklahoma Trail Etiquette & Safety

 

Non-Motorized Trails

·        Be courteous and respectful of fellow trail users and the surrounding environment.

·        Stay on designated trail – don’t create new trails by short cutting switchbacks.

·        Develop a relationship with your land manager. Find out how you can help.

·        Share the trails. Cyclists yield to all other trail users, and hikers yield to equestrians. Slower traffic should keep to the right of the trail; faster users pass on the left.

·        Be aware. Do not pass on narrow bends; pass only when you can clearly see the trail and traffic approaching from the opposite direction. When passing other trail users, provide adequate warning and reduce speed.

·        Watch out. Wildlife is wild -- keep your distance. Horses and dogs on the trail may act unexpectedly. Before approaching these animals, ask the handler for guidance. Tread lightly.

·        Stay off muddy trails. This causes erosion. Please allow 24-48 hours for the trail to dry.

 

Motorized Trails

·        Know where you're permitted to ride. Respect closed areas and private property.

·        If you must cross water, ride carefully and only at designated spots.

·        It is your responsibility to ensure that your vehicle is trail-worthy and reliable.

·        No alcohol on trail rides. Open container laws apply on the trail.

·        Noise annoys. Maintain your exhaust system. Remember, noise doesn't equal horsepower.

·        When meeting oncoming vehicular traffic, vehicles traveling uphill have the right of way.

·        When meeting oncoming non-vehicular traffic, slow down and yield the right of way.

·        Ensure you have the minimum mandatory equipment — full-size spare, recovery strap, frame-mounted recovery points (front and rear), jack and lug wrench, fire extinguisher, first-aid kit, area maps, and trash bag.

·        When traveling in a group, keep the vehicle behind you in sight at all times. If it falls out of sight or seems to need help, slow down or wait, and inform the vehicles in front of you.

·        If you feel uncomfortable about an obstacle, please ask for a spotter. The driver should designate who the spotter is, and follow the spotter’s direction. To avoid confusion, there should be only one person spotting a vehicle over an obstacle. As a spectator, if you wish to help, talk to the spotter, not the driver.

·        If you stack rocks to help clear an obstacle, put them back where you found them.

·        Give the vehicles around you plenty of room to maneuver on the trail. Do not tailgate.

·        If the vehicle is going up/down a steep hill or through an obstacle, wait until they are clear before you start.

·        Be considerate of the drivers behind you. Do not spend an excessive amount of time trying to conquer an obstacle. Not only does it make everyone wait, but also deteriorates the trail, and increases the likelihood of vehicle damage. Three attempts per obstacle is a good rule of thumb.

·        Safety always comes first. Please know your vehicle limitations and think of your safety and the safety of others. When traveling in a group, please respect your trail leader’s direction.

·        Keep your vehicle as level as possible, allowing all tires to be in contact with the ground. This prevents wheel spin, digging holes and trail erosion.

 

Source: http://www.travelok.com/trails/safety.asp (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

Old Plank Road Trail

 

Trail Etiquette

 

·        Motorized vehicles are prohibited

·        Stay on the designated trails

·        Be courteous to all trail users

·        Announce your intention to pass

·        Keep right and pass left

·        Move off the trail when stopped

·        Bicyclists yield to walkers

·        Dispose of trash properly

·        Pets must be leashed

·        Remove pet waste from trail

 

Source: http://oprt.org/ (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

Old Quarry Nature Center

Basic Trail Etiquette

 

·        Keep the trails and grounds free of litter. 

·        Subscribe to the motto: "Carry in - Carry Out".  

·        Leave all aspects of the natural surroundings as you find them, for others to enjoy. "Take only photographs - Leave only footprints".

·        Maintain the tranquility of the surroundings by refraining from generating exceptionally loud noise.

·        Do not block trails, move to the side and allow others to pass, as necessary.

·        Treat others you meet on the trails with kindness and respect.

·        Keep pets under control, preferably leashed.

·        Aid in keeping the trails clear and hazard-free, by moving aside any large, naturally fallen debris.  Report any exceptionally large trail obstructions to Nature Center or City officials.

 

Source: http://www.danbury.org/oldquarry/trail%20etiquette.htm (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

Oregon State University College Forests

 

Trail Etiquette

·        Yield Right of Way

o       All users yield to motor vehicles.

o       Hikers yield to horses.

o       Mountain bikes yield to all other user groups.

·        Protect Yourself and Others

o       Greet others on the road or trail. Let others know when you are overtaking them.

o       Pass horses only after rider tells you it is safe.

o       Control your speed. Slow down on blind curves.

o       Be able to stop in half the distance you can see.

·        Practice Good Stewardship

o       Leave research projects undisturbed. Traveling on unauthorized trails can disturb study sites and disrupt years of important research.

o       Respect private property and observe all posted signs. McDonald Forest is surrounded by many neighbors. Ask permissions from the owners before crossing their land.

o       Avoid disturbing wildlife. This saves animals from injury, but also protects research on wildlife behavior and habitat.

·        Protect Natural Resources

o       Tread lightly.

o       Stay off muddy trails to reduce erosion damage.

o       Avoid trampling vegetation or cutting new trails.

o       Stay on roads and trails designated for your mode of travel.

Source: http://www.cof.orst.edu/cf/recreation/etiquette.php (accessed April 21, 2006)

 

Oregon-California Trails Association (Idaho Chapter)

 

Trail Etiquette and Precautions                                                                                                       

 

·        Do not take any archaeological and historical artifacts found along the trails.  Not only is it illegal, it steals history from all of us.  Archaeological and historical artifacts should be left undisturbed.  There are substantial penalties for the removal, defacement, or destruction of these items.

·        Do not drive on, or adjacent to, pristine ruts which do not show signs of vehicle use.  Some ruts are obviously used for traffic, others are pristine and should only be walked upon.

·        Do not drive on any ruts when they are wet or muddy.

·        Do not drive across the desert.  Stay on existing roads and trails.

·        Do not leave litter or trash on the trails.  Clean up trash that you find.

·        Do not damage or remove trail markers or signs.

·        Leave gates as you find them.  Close them behind you if they were closed.

·        Respect private property and landowner's rights.  Heed no trespassing signs.  Obtain permission of the landowner before crossing private land.

·        Be extremely careful with cigarettes, fire, or driving over dry grasses.  

·        Desert rangeland is extremely flammable.                                                                                  

·        Take only pictures.  Leave only footprints.

·        Travel across the Idaho desert can be rough and sometimes dangerous.  Be prepared for emergencies by following these guidelines:

o       Take plenty of water and food with you.

o       Travel with others when possible.

o       Take extra spare tires and tools to deal with vehicle breakdowns.

o       Let people know where you will be going and when you should return.

o       Carry warm clothing and blankets for emergencies.  Idaho nights are often chilly and the weather can change quickly.

 

Source: http://www.idahoocta.org/Trail_Etiquette.html (accessed April 24, 2006)                                                                                                                                                                                                                

 

 

Otago Central Rail Trail

 

Code of Conduct

·        Share the Rail Trail with others.

·        Young children should be accompanied at all times.

·        Move to the left when you meet other users.

·        Private motorcycles and motor vehicles are not permitted on the Rail Trail.

·        Cyclists are required to wear safety helmets.

·        Mountain bikers must take special care when passing horses from behind.

·        Give way to horses on bridges. Wait until they are safely across before proceeding. Horses are to be led across bridges.

·        Where possible, horses must be ridden on the grass immediately to either side of the Rail Trail, rather than the gravel trail itself.

·        Leave gates as you find them and do not disturb any stock along the Rail Trail (take extra care during lambing time - September / October).

·        Always use toilets where available. The locations of public and trail toilets are indicated on your map. Toilet paper is not provided at trail toilets. In areas without toilets bury your waste away from waterways and to the side of the Rail Trail.

·        Dogs are permitted on the Alexandra to Clyde section only and must be controlled on a lead at all times.

·        Open fires and firearms are not permitted on the Rail Trail.

·        Do not venture on to private property.

·        Take all your rubbish away with you. Be a tidy Kiwi.

·        STAY ON THE RAIL TRAIL

 

Source: http://www.centralotagorailtrail.co.nz/index.htm (accessed April 26, 2006)

 

 

Parks and Wildlife Service Tasmania

 

Minimal Impact Mountain Biking

 

·        Plan your ride.

o       Take account of the group’s riding ability and fitness level when planning the route you will follow. Let someone know your trip intentions before you go. Keep your bike in good condition and take a repair kit, even on short rides. Check the weather before you go. Keep your party size small to help minimise your impact. If you plan an overnight expedition, pick up the brochure Camping Means Caring for minimal impact camping advice.

·        Keeping it clean

o       The root rot fungus Phytophthora cinnamomi is present in Tasmania. This fungus is transmitted in mud and soil and can kill native plants. To help stop the spread of Phytophthora make sure you start the ride with clean equipment including tyres, frame, gears and shoes. At the end of your ride wash down all equipment – it’s better for your bike as well.

·        Respect others

o       Give way to all other users on a trail. Slow down to their pace and let them know you’re there well before you pass. Be particularly careful near horses on shared trails – stop and let the horses pass you. Ride at a pace that allows you to stop within the distance you can see. Ride in single file where the track is narrow or when passing other users. Riding at off peak times can decrease encounters with other users. Heed all directional and access signs, and leave gates as you find them.

·        Pack it in – pack it out

o       Do the bush a favour and take your rubbish out with you. Rubbish looks terrible in the bush and spoils the experience for those who follow. Most rubbish won’t decompose and animals often try to eat it. Rubbish includes food scraps and wrappers, twist ties and sanitary products.

·        Respect the ride

o       Help preserve the riding conditions that you encounter today for tomorrow. Ride only on approved trails and try to stick to the middle of the track. Cutting corners, riding on the edge of a trail or riding beside steps can harm track-side vegetation and widen the trail. Try to avoid skidding or sliding, particularly on steep hills, as this can damage the trail itself. Keep your speed suitable to the conditions. Avoid riding in wet or muddy conditions.

·        Respect yourself

o       For your own safety always wear a helmet when riding. Ensure everyone in the group carries plenty of water – it’s easy to get dehydrated riding. Take high-energy food with you as well. A first aid kit and sunscreen are essential, and take suitable clothing to cope with rapid changes in weather.

 

Source: http://www.tasforestrytourism.com.au/pdfs/mountain_biking_respect.pdf (accessed April 26, 2006)

 

 

Parks and Wildlife Service, Forestry Tasmania, Tourism Tasmania, Sport and Recreation Tasmania, Tasmanian Recreational Vehicle Association.

 

 

The National 4WD Code of Ethics

 

·        Obey the laws and regulations for Recreational Vehicles that apply to public lands.

·        Respect the cultural, heritage and environmental values of public/private land, by obeying restrictions that may apply.

·        Respect our flora and fauna. Stop and look, but .... never disturb

·        Keep to formed vehicle tracks.

·        Keep the environment clean. Carry your own, and any other, rubbish out.

·        Keep your vehicle mechanically sound and clean to reduce the environmental impact.

·        Adopt minimal impact camping and driving practices.

·        Seek permission before driving on private land. Do not disturb livestock or watering points, leave gates as found.

·        Take adequate water, food, fuel, basic spares and a first aid kit on trips. ...In remote areas travel with another vehicle and have Royal Flying Doctor Service, ...or equivalent, ...radio contact.

·        Enjoy your recreation and respect the rights of others.

·        Plan ahead and lodge trip details with a responsible person.

·        Support four-wheel drive touring as a responsible and legitimate family recreational activity....Consider joining an affiliated four-wheel drive Club.

 

Source: http://www.tasforestrytourism.com.au/pdfs/cruisin_without_bruisin.pdf (accessed April 26, 2006)

 

Path Trails: Metro Atlanta’s Greenway Trail System

Trail Etiquette

·         Yield to pedestrians.

o        Pedestrians always have the right-of-way.

·         Keep right and pass on the left.

o        The trail is like a roadway.

·         Announce yourself; for example, "On your left!"

o        Warn trail users as you approach from behind.

·         If you stop, get off the trail.

o        Always allow other trail users to pass on the left.

·         Report crime and maintenance problems to PATH.

o        Watch out for maintenance and security needs while on the trail.

·         Obey all signs and rules.

o        Stop at intersections.

o        Travel at safe speeds.

o        Keep right.

·         Keep the trail clean.

o        Don't litter.

o        Recycle trash on the trail.

·         Don't use the trail at night.

o        The trail is CLOSED from dusk to dawn.

·         Keep animals under control.

o        Keep pets on a short leash.

o        Walk pets on the right-hand shoulder.

o        Clean animal waste from the trail.

Source: http://www.pathfoundation.org/trails/etiquette.cfm (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

ATV Trail etiquette

·        Be considerate of others on the trail and keep to the right.

·        Slow down when passing.

·        Ride only where permitted.

·        Leave gates as you find them.

·        Yield the right of way to bikes, horses and hikers.

·        Carry out what you carry in.

·        Wave and say 'hello' as you pass.

·        Report downed trees and trail maintenance needs to land managers

Source: http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/forestry/atv/etiquette.aspx (accessed April 21, 2006)

Pittsburg Trail Advocacy Group

 

Proper Trail Etiquette

 

·        Use Open Trails Only

o       Trails may be closed for a variety of reasons. Trail users should respect closures and avoid trespassing on private land.

·        Leave No Trace

o       Be sensitive to the dirt beneath you. Recognize different types of soils and trail construction. Wet and muddy trails are more vulnerable to damage.

·        Always Yield Trail

o       Yielding means to slow down, establish communication, being prepared to stop if necessary, then passing safely. Bikes yield to horses and hikers.

·        Never Scare Animals

o       All animals are startled by an unannounced approach, a sudden movement or a loud noise. This can be dangerous for you, others and the animals.

·        Plan Ahead

o       Know your equipment, your ability, and the area in which you are riding—prepare accordingly. Be self-sufficient at all times.

·        Educate Others

o        Talk respectfully with other trail users about proper trail etiquette, especially new users.

·        Maintain Trails

o       Find a local trail maintenance club by contacting land managers where you play. Spend a day or more each season giving back to the trails you already enjoy.

 

Source: http://www.porcmtbclub.org/pdfs/trail_etq.pdf (accessed April 21, 2006)

 

 

Poudre River Trail Corridor

Trail Etiquette

·        Stay with on the right with the flow of traffic

·        Stay single file. Groups should be in single file when other trail users are present and should never use more than one-half of the trail to allow for the flow of traffic.

·        Control your speed! Obey speed regulations when present. Slow down and use caution when approaching or overtaking other trail users.

·        Who Yields the Trail? Before passing another trail user make your approach known well in advance. A friendly greeting "Hello, passing on your left," or ringing a bell is considerate and works well. All trail users bicyclists, skaters, walkers, or others yield to equestrians. Bicyclists and skaters yield to walkers. Bicyclists yield to skaters. Downhill users yield to uphill users. Faster users yield to slower users.

·        Respect the resources: Look at wildlife from a distance, leave wildflowers and plants for others to enjoy, and stay on the designated trail

·        Always look before changing positions on the trail.

·        Be courteous-all trail users should be respectful of other users regardless of the type of recreation activity, speed, or skill level.

·        Be respectful of private property-trails are open to the public, but most of the adjacent land is private property. In many cases, adjacent landowners were generous in donating the land which the trail is located on.

·        Practice the "Leave No Trace" principles-be sensitive to the area, stay on existing trails and pack out at least as much as you take in.

Source: http://poudretrail.org/etiq.htm (accessed April 21, 2006)

 

 

Prince Albert National Park of Canada

 

Trail Cycling Code of Ethics

·        Cycle only on designated trails. Stay on the trail. Riding around mud holes damages trailside vegetation.

·        Treat other trail users with courtesy, especially on downhill stretches. Slow down when approaching blind spots.

·        Use a bell or call out to alert other users and wildlife to your presence.

·        Choose a trail that matches your abilities. Park staff or staff at bike shops can help you choose a trail within your abilities.

·        Dogs must be kept on a leash at all times. This is often awkward and uncomfortable for both the rider and animal. Consider leaving your pet at home or with friends.

·        Horses have the right of way. In encounters with horse parties, dismount and stand a few feet off the trail (preferably on the downhill side) until the party has passed. When approaching from behind, stay a few metres back to avoid being kicked. Let horse riders know of your presence and wait for their instructions before you pass.

·        Bicycles can take you further into the backcountry than you can walk in a day. You are responsible for your own safety and be prepared to make your own repairs.

·        Don't litter! If you pack it in please pack it out.

Source: http://www.pc.gc.ca/pn-np/sk/princealbert/activ/activ9_e.asp (accessed April 19, 2006)

 

Railstrails Australia

 

·        Trail Etiquette

o       When using rail trails, respect the rights of other users, the natural and cultural environment, and the local communities that care for trail.

·        Sharing

o       Keep left and do not obstruct the trails.

o       Cyclists: alert other users of your approach and pass on the right at a reduced speed

o       Approach horses with care

o       Move quietly near stock

o       Park in designated areas where provided and don't block access tracks

o       Leave gates as you find them

o       Observe local signs and regulations

·        Environment

o       Keep on the track

o       Many native plants are protected and generally should not be sampled

o       Clean bikes, walking boots and other equipment after your trip to minimise the spread of plant and animal diseases

o       Do not interfere with wildlife

o       Take your rubbish home with you

o       Observe local fire restrictions and be particularly cautious on total fire ban days

·        Dogs

o       Dogs are allowed on most trails but may not be allowed where there is a risk to wildlife or livestock

o       Keep dogs under control at all times

o       Dogs should be kept on-leash except in specified off-leash areas

o       Clean up after your dog

·        For your safety

o       Exercise caution at road crossings; young and inexperienced cyclists should dismount

o       Carry plenty of water and light snacks

o       Consider appropriate clothing for the conditions

o       Riders, wear an approved helmet and ride in control

o       Maintain your equipment, and carry repair and first aid kits in case of emergencies

o       Let someone know before you go

 

 

Source: http://www.railtrails.org.au/trails/conduct.htm (accessed April 26, 2006)

 

 

Riding Mountain National Park

 

Code of Conduct in Riding Mountain National Park

 

·        Walk on the designated trails and do not step off the trail if possible.

·        Be aware of stressing wildlife and do not approach an animal that is demonstrating signs of stress from your presence and ‘back off’ if your presence is causing them to show signs of stress.  Retreating somewhat before seeing the signs of stress will often afford you a rewarding viewing experience.

·        Respect the instructions of your guide.  Your guide is experienced and aware of stressful situations your actions may cause wildlife, so please respect his or her decision to retreat or to completely avoid putting specific animal in stressful situations.  For example, certain species of birds are easily disturbed during the incubation period and your presence may cause them to abandon their nests.

·        When photographing wildlife use your longest lens.

·        Do not feed wildlife, leave edible material unattended or dispose of edible material, except in proper refuse containers. 

·        Do not uproot plants or break branches.

·        Please respect the habitat of wildlife by leaving things as you found them. Minimize plant disturbances when photographing plants, animals or landscapes.  Stay on the trails or roadways if possible.

·        Do not acquire souvenirs in the Park, such as stones, plants, seeds, feathers, bones, antlers or archaeological artifacts.

·        Be extremely careful with fire, particularly if you are a smoker.  Make sure matches and cigarette butts are extinguished and return them to the ashtrays in the vehicle.

·        Use public washroom facilities when ever possible.

·        Use the garbage bags in the vehicles or the public garbage bins in the Park and please do not litter.  Picking up litter from others is always appreciated.

·        Do not contaminate the environment with solid waste, soap or other chemicals or exotic species.  It is very important to make sure your clothing and footwear are free of plant seeds to prevent the introduction of exotic species into the natural areas you will be visiting.

·        Take only pictures and leave only foot prints.

 

Source: http://www.ridingmountain.ca/codermnp.htm (accessed April 20, 2006)

 

 

Royal National Park

 

The Cycling Code of Conduct

 

  • Keep bicycles clean to avoid the spread of weeds and fungi.
  • Stay on designated cycling routes, i.e. fire trails and designated (signposted) trails.
  • Observe cycle route closures.
  • Give way to walkers, slow down on blind corners, keep left and signal approaches using a bell.
  • Not make new trails, move bush rock or logs or prune or cut native vegetation.
  • Wear a helmet and appropriate clothing and carry water and a first aid kit.
  • Not ride after heavy rain or skid the bicycle,to prevent track erosion.
  • Observe park closures, generally after hours and during total fire bans.
  • Make others aware of the code of conduct.

 

Source: http://www.dipnr.nsw.gov.au/notices/guide_pages_51_end.pdf (accessed April 29, 2006)

 

 

Rubicon Trail

 

Ethics and Tread Lightly Principles

 

  • Stay on the trail. Never get off the trail. Do not camp some place where you have to make a new trail to get there.
  • Leave no trace. Air down; drive slow; and don't spin your tires where you don't need to. Stay on the rocks.
  • Follow the established route. Do not create a new route or bypass.
  • Be courteous of other drivers. Don't hold up the line and upset those behind you when you don't need to or have an alternative (such as getting out of the way).
  • Pick up trash you see along the trail.
  • Talk to other riders/drivers about their bad habits if you see some.
  • Never drive into or through wet areas or meadows. Stay on the trail that avoids these sensitive spots.  Don't drive over vegetation. If you have to take a mud puddle, take the most used line and go slow.
  • If your vehicle breaks down, try to limp it out of the way as soon as you can so as to not hold up those behind you. Every one is on a schedule these days. And no one likes to be held up. We all want to get as much fun in as we can in a short period of time. Be thoughtful.
  • Obey the law.
  • Don't drive over vegetation or make mud holes worse.
  • Help a wheeler in need.
  • Camp at least 30 feet from water sources (lakes, creeks, ponds).
  • Don't shoot in camps or along the trail. There are too many folks up there, and you never know where the granite will send you glancing bullet.
  • Drink responsibly.
  • Have fun; be safe; but be smart about our future.

 

Source: http://www.delalbright.com/Rubicon/ethics.htm (Friends of the Rubicon) (accessed on April 19, 2006)

 

San Mateo County Horesemen's Association


Trail Etiquette

·        Check all tack carefully before starting out on each ride.

·        It is highly recommended that all riders wear boots with heels, helmets and user ID on their person.

·        Follow all instructions of the trail boss (usually the lead rider).

·        Do not ride ahead of the trail boss without his/her permission.

·        Do not fall behind the designated drag rider (last rider).

·        Do not separate yourself from the other riders.

·        Maintain one horse length between your horse and the horse in front of you.

·        Don't stop at the top of a hill or on a narrow section of trail if there are riders behind you.  If you must stop, keep moving until there is a wide spot to get completely off the trail, so other riders can safely pass.

·        Notify riders behind you of any trail hazards you observe, such as holes in the trail, wire, branches, etc.

·        Do not hold on to branches when you go through trees or bushes.

·        Do not gallop up to or away from other horses.

·        Don't ride off from a gate or watering spot until all riders are mounted and ready to move on.

·        Walk down into gullies or inclines at a safe distance from the horse in front of you.  Never trot or gallop into or out of them.

·        If you have a slow walking horse, or you are having problems with your horse, ride to the rear of the group, in front of the drag rider.

·        If you must leave the main group, notify the trail boss or the drag rider.

·        There will be no smoking on the trail.   Smoking at rest stops and luch stops will be at the discretion of the trail boss.

·        Do not leave paper, cans or trash on the trails or at lunch sites

Source: http://www.smcha.org/trail_etiquette.htm (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

Santa Cruz Circle Trail

 

Trail Etiquette

 

·        Respect the land -- don't make shortcuts.

·        Protect wildlife and vegetation.

·        Tread lightly and leave no trace by packing out litter and avoiding trails when they are muddy .

·        Keep to the right of the trail -- save the left side for passing. Adjust your speed when approaching other users. When overtaking another trail user, announce your intentions. When in a group, allow enough room for other users and don't block the trail.

·        Bicyclists and skaters, keep your speed down to a reasonable pace. Approach each bend as if someone were around the corner.

·        Know which areas are open to bicycles and always stay on approved trails. Riding and walking off-trail damages resources.

·        Bicyclists yield to all other trail users. Hikers yield to horses.

·        Pet owners, keep your pet on a leash.

·        Respect adjacent private properties and stay on the trail.

 

Source: http://www.ecotopia.org/trail/etiquette.html (accessed April 21, 2006)

 

South Australian Trails

 

Trail Code - enjoy and respect the environment you are visiting

 

·        Observe fire restrictions. In most areas fires are prohibited from November 1 to April 30.

·        Conserve native habitat by using liquid fuel or gas stoves for cooking.

·        Trails are closed on days when Total Fire Bans are declared via newspapers and radio.

·        Leave your pets at home and take your rubbish with you.

·        Camp only in designated areas. Permits and fees may be required.

·        Permits are required to ride horses in Forest Reserves. Contact ForestrySA.

·        Respect geological or heritage sites.

·        Do not feed or disturb animals or remove native plants.

·        Keep to defined trails or vehicle tracks and be considerate of other users.

·        Respect private or leased land traversed by trails. Don't damage fences - use any stiles provided. Leave gates as you find them.

·        Steer clear of farming infrastructure such as pumps, dams, sheds, electric fences and machinery. Avoid livestock and don’t interfere with them.

·        Take care not to spread pest plants or diseases.

·        Remember to check your clothes for weed seeds, clean your boots, bicycle and other equipment to reduce transfer between areas.

 

Source: http://www.southaustraliantrails.com/pdf/safety.pdf (accessed April 26, 2006)

 

 

South Carolina State Trails Program

 

Trail User Etiquette

Rules of the Trail - guidelines for multi-use non-motorized trails and paths

·        Keep right

o       Ride/Skate/Walk as far to the right as practical, except when passing another user going your direction (pass on the left). Control your speed, slow down and use caution when approaching or overtaking other trails or pathways users.

·        Be predictable

o       Travel in a consistent and predictable manner. Always look behind before changing positions on the trail or path.

·        Don't block the trail or path

o       Ride/Skate/Walk single file when other users are present. Use no more than half the trail or path so as not to block the flow of other users. When stopping, move off the trail or path.

·        Obey traffic signs and signals

o       Use extra caution where trail or path crosses streets, driveways, or other trails and paths.

·        Be courteous

o       Before passing, be courteous and announce your intentions by saying "passing on your left" or ringing a bell. All users, including bicyclists, joggers, walkers, wheelchairs, skateboarders, bladers and skaters, should be respectful of other users regardless of their mode, speed, or skill level.

·        Be respectful of private property

o       Trails and paths are open to the public, but often the adjacent land is private property. Please respect all property rights.

Rules of the Trail for Mountain Bicyclists

·        Ride on open trails only

o       Respect closures, avoid trespassing, obtain permission as required.

·        Leave no trace

o       Be sensitive to the area, stay on existing trails, pack out what you take in.

·        Control your bicycle

o       Pay attention! Anticipate problems, keep your speed under control.

·        Bicyclists always yield!

o       Make your approach known, be courteous. Always yield to uphill users.

·        Never spook animals

o       Animals startle easily and can cause a dangerous situation for you and others.

·        Plan ahead

o       Know your equipment and ability, carry gear for changing weather conditions.

Rules of the Road for Bicyclists

·        Rights & duties

o       Bicyclists have all the rights and duties applicable to the driver of any other vehicle, and can be penalized for violating traffic laws.

·        Signs and signals

o       Obey traffic signs and signals. Use hand signals to indicate left or right turns, slowing or stopping.

·        Ride single file

o       You may ride two abreast when no motor vehicle traffic is approaching within 300 feet (front or rear). You may ride two or more abreast when all bicyclist are on the shoulder. On curving or hilly roads, play it say and ride single file.

·        Ride to the right - and never against traffic

o       Ride in the right-hand lane or on the paved shoulder except when passing another vehicle, preparing for a left turn, or avoiding road hazards.

·        At night, use a light

o       At night, use a headlight, tail light, and reflectors.

Trail Etiquette for ATVs and Motorcycles

·        Respect private property

o       Know were you're permitted to ride and where you're not. Respect private property and closed areas; that's good public relations.

·        Be courteous

o       Always be courteous when you pass hikers on a trail or other vehicles on a dirt road. Remember, one little blip of the throttle can leave a shower of gravel or a cloud of dust´and an enemy´behind you.

·        Be quiet

o       Even a quiet ATV or motorcycle can seem noisy; it depends on how and where you ride it. Keep the RPMs and speed low and steady when you're near houses and campgrounds, or anytime you're around non-riders.

·        Meeting horses

o       When you meet a horseback rider, go slowly and stop on the outside of the trail. Shut off your engine. Take off your helmet and say hello. Speak in a calm, normal voice. The horse needs to recognize you as a human. Avoid any sudden movements.

·        Stay on the trail

o       Don't cut switchbacks or take shortcuts; it sends a poor message about your sport and causes environmental damage.

·        Be a good citizen

o       Above all, think about yourself as an ambassador for ATV and motorcycle trail riding. Your actions speak for all riders so be sure that everyone you meet remembers trail riders as good citizens.

Equestrian Trail Etiquette Tips

·        Know the local trail rules. Courtesy is the best safety on the trail.

·        Minimize impact by staying on designated trails and avoiding muddy conditions. Don't cut switchbacks.

·        Say hello. Tell other users how many are in your party. Pass with care. If uncertain, ask.

·        Always speak when approaching horses. A horse's vision is restricted but it's hearing is acute.

·        Leave gates as you find them. Obey gate closures and regulatory signs.

·        Know your horse's limitations.

·        Ride your horse at a safe and controlled speed. Be especially careful when visibility is limited.

·        Let other trail riders know when it is safe to pass your horse.

·        A hand out and down is a warning for others to slow down or stop.

·        Keep trailhead and campgrounds clear of manure and trash.

 

Source: http://www.sctrails.net/Trails/MISC/Etiquette.html (accessed April 21, 2006)

 

Southern Arizona Hiking Club

 

Code of Conduct

 

  • Respect all public and private property. 
  • Leave all gates as found unless signed otherwise.
  • Build fires in a safe place and make sure they are put out before leaving. 
  • Carry out my litter, including apple cores, banana skins, and orange peels. 
  • On a trail hike, stay on trail and not cut switchbacks. 
  • Preserve wildlife and not contaminate any water supply.
  • I will conduct myself in such a manner as not to impair the safety, health or enjoyment of others and myself.
  • Accept the leadership and instructions of the guide. 
  • Bring no pets or firearms. 
  • Not participate in any outing which is beyond my physical capability. 
  • Bring food, water, clothing and equipment which is appropriate for each outing.

 

Source: http://www.sahcinfo.org/code.htm (accessed April 29, 2006)

 

Spokane Centennial Trail

Centennial Trail Rules & Etiquette

Rules:

·        Trail hours: dawn to dusk, year-round

·        No alcoholic beverages on the trail

·        Speed Limit: 15 m.p.h. maximum

·        Pedestrians have the right of way on the paved trail

·        Horses have the right of way on soft trail

·        No horses on asphalt paved trail

·        Pets must be under control and on a six foot or shorter leash at all times

·        Do not disturb the plants or animals

·        Pack it in... Pack it out!

·        No structures (including vendor equipment) allowed within the trail property boundaries

Etiquette:

·        Observe trail rules and signs

·        Keep on the right, pass on the left, and yield to faster moving users

·        Signal slower moving trail users when approaching

·        Wear a helmet when cycling or in-line skating

·        Use caution where trail narrows and at high-use access points

·        Bicyclists stay on designated trail, two riders abreast maximum (single file if pedestrians are present)

·        Wheel Skiers/in-line skaters do not use sharp-tipped poles

·        Skateboarders stay on paved trail; no jumps or demonstration-type skateboarding

·        HAVE FUN AND ENJOY THE CENTENNIAL TRAIL

 

 

Source: http://www.spokanecentennialtrail.org/rules.htm (accessed April 24, 2006)

 

 

 

Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve

 

Outdoor ethics

 

·        Walk dogs only on the North Beach and 5th and Iris Trail. Dogs must be kept on a leash at all times.

·        All plants, animals and physical features (shells, rocks, etc.) Are protected and may not be removed or damaged.

·        No weapons or fireworks are permitted on the Reserve.

·        Please, no littering or dumping.

·        Trespassing beyond special area closure signs is prohibited.

·        Fishing, clamming, and shrimping are permitted from the beach area only.

·        Use officially designated trails only for hiking, biking, dog walking, and horseback riding.

·        Fires and camping are not permitted on the reserve.

·        Alcohol and drugs are prohibited on the reserve.

·        While walking through the reserve, please respect the animals and their homes. Speak softly, walk calmly, and stay on the trails for the best view of wildlife.

 

Source: http://www.tijuanaestuary.com/Trail_Map_6-03.pdf (accessed April 20, 2006)

 

 

Trail Riders Fellowship

 

The TRF Code of Conduct

·        Use only vehicular rights of way. Trail riding is only lawful on public roads. If in doubt, check with the Highway Authority or the TRF. Motorcycles and riders must be road-legal. Green lanes are subject to the same laws as surfaced roads.

·        Keep to the defined way across farmland. Wheels can damage crops and grass. Wandering from the road onto farmland or moorland is trespassing.

·        Give way to walkers, horses and cyclists. As a courtesy, on narrow lanes, stop and switch off engines.

·        Acknowledge the presence of other green lane users with a friendly wave or other suitable gesture.

·        Fasten gates to safeguard stock.  Except those tied open for farming purposes. An open gate invites animals to stray, endangering themselves, and crops or traffic.

·        Travel at a safe speed. Ride at a reasonable speed, taking regard of conditions and visibility. This should not exceed the voluntary maximum of 25mph.

·        Ride quietly. Machines must be effectively silenced. Use the throttle with discretion, as noise does offend. Green lanes are subject to the same laws as surfaced roads.

·        Honour the country code. Respect the countryside and those who live, work and play in it. Green lanes can be valuable habitats, so take special care in spring and early summer.

·        ldentify yourself. Carry your membership card with you when trail riding, so that you may identify yourself as a current member of the TRF - and display a current membership sticker.

Source: http://www.trf.org.uk/code.php (accessed April 18, 2006)

 

 

Trails and Open Space Coalition (Pikes Peak Colorado)

Trail Etiquette

·        Respect other users, expect other users.

·        Be friendly and courteous.

·        Share the trail. Ride, walk or run on the right, pass on the left.

·        Stay on the trail. Creating your own trail or cutting switchbacks creates erosion, damages habitat and causes new trails which can't be maintained.

·        Bicyclists yield to equestrians, runners and hikers. Keep your bike under control and at a safe speed.

·        Runners and hikers yield to equestrians.

·        Downhill traffic should yield to uphill traffic. When in doubt, give the other user the right of way.

·        Use unpaved trails only when they are dry, not muddy or wet, to avoid leaving ruts or prints.

·        Warn people when you are planning to pass. Use your voice to warn equestrians, not bells or horns. Bells or horns may frighten horses.

·        Anticipate other trail users around corners and blind spots.

·        Ride within your ability at all times.

·        Respect wildlife.

·        Use caution when using headphones. You may not be able to hear people trying to warn you.

·        When a horse approaches, move off the trail and ask the rider for instructions.

·        Leave no trace. Pack out your litter.

·        Dog should be kept on leashes and under control.

·        Respect private property.

Source: http://www.trailsandopenspaces.org/trails/etiquette.htm (accessed April 21, 2006)

Trails BC

 

Trails BC: Safety on the Trans Canada Trail

 

·        All Trail Users

o       Share the Trail: The Trans Canada Trail is a shared corridor for a variety of participants: hikers, cyclists, horseback riders, cross-country skiers and snowmobilers, where possible.

o       Be aware that on some sections of the trail, motorized equipment may be utilized for farming, forestry or other purposes.

o       Respect the rights of other trail users and adjoining land owners

o       Where the trail corridor is grazed, don’t disturb the stock. Respect open and closed gating arrangements.

o       Where agricultural activities such as orchards are nearby, keep to the trail.

o       Use designated public services and access points. Never leave vehicles blocking adjacent properties or the trail route.

o       Obey all posted signs.

o       Please don't litter - pack out what you pack in.

o       Please keep your dog on a leash or at home. Dogs can be a nuisance to others, and may harass livestock and wildlife.

o       Please do not collect natural materials along the trail. Flowers, trees, plants and even rocks are part of the trail’s natural resources.

o       Leave heritage features in place. BC law forbids the removal of archaeological material or historical artifacts.

o       Observe all fire restrictions and take all due care with fires.

 

·        While cycling along BC’s Trans Canada Trail:

o       Watch out for other trail users on the Trans Canada Trail, especially when approaching corners and blind spots.

o       Make sure your speed is appropriate for current trail conditions, crowding and visibility levels.

o       When passing other trail users, use a bell and give adequate warning.

o       In all circumstances yield to pedestrians.

o       Stay on marked trails. Riding off the beaten path can damage local vegetation.

o       Walk across bridges and trestles. Approach tunnels with care.

o       Don’t trespass on private property.

 

Source: http://www.trailsbc.ca/safety.html (accessed on  April 18, 2006)

 

 

The Trans Pennine Trail

 

User Code

 

·        All users

o       where different paths, or sides of the path are signed for different user groups - please keep to your side

o       if you are in a group, please do not walk or ride across the whole width of the path, leave space for others to pass you easily

o       take great care where the Trans Pennine Trail crosses or follows roads

o       take all your litter home and be careful with cigarette ends due to risk of fire

o       dog owners - please clean up after your pet - dog mess spoils the trail and adjacent areas for other people and poses health risks

o       keep close control of your dog - preferably on a short lead, especially where farm animals are present

·        Horse Riders

o       use only sections of the trail where horses are allowed

o       do not use the trail unless you can control your horse - you may encounter walkers, people using wheelchairs and scooters, cyclists, dogs and bridges over road, rail and water

o       do not canter or gallop on shared sections of the trail

o       please avoid damaging trail surfaces and don't ride on the grass central dividing strip

·        Horse riders and cyclists

o       warn others when you approach from behind so you do not startle people as you pass by - call politely or use a bell/hooter

o       slow down when approaching other users who are unpredictable, particularly children or animals; remember too, some people may have a hearing impairment

o       helmets and high visibility clothing will add to your safety

o       please ride in single file on narrow sections

·        Cyclists

o       must not use this route for racing competitions or speed trails